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Full text of "Graduate school"

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In2u.Zcf 
1908/09 -19/o/M 






<>L. VI. No. (5 



JUNK 15, 1908 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 
BULLETIN 







GRADUATE SCHOOL 

1908 



ered „ second-d.,, mat „ r May ,6, „„ 8 , „ t the postoflice , t B , oonl]llgtoI1 ^.^ 
under act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



"The highest function of the real university is 
that of instruction by investigation. the essential 
quality of the university is the presence in its fac- 
ulty of men qualified to do university work. it mat- 
ters not how many or how few the subjects taught, 
or what may be the material equipment of the 
teacher, the school in which study and investigation 

go hand in hand is in its degree a university." david 

Starr Jordan. 



(2) 



c 









INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



VOL. VI BLOOM1NGTON, IND., JUNE 15, 1908 NO. 6 

Entered as second-class matter May 16, 1908, at the postoffice at Bloomington, Indiana, under 
Act of July 16, 1894. Published from the University office, Bloomington, Indiana, semi-monthly 
April, May, and June, and monthly January, February, March, July, September, and November. 



The Graduate School 



In this number of the Bulletin are presented details 
relating to the Graduate School of Indiana University — 
its purpose and administration, equipment of the Univer- 
sity for graduate work, requirements for advanced de- 
grees, scholarships and teaching fellowships available, 
and announcements of courses for 1908-09 in the several 
departments comprising the school. Undergraduate 
courses are here listed only briefly. For details concern- 
ing these, and for other information concerning the Uni- 
versity not here given, address 

The Kegistrar, Indiana University, 

Bloomington, Indiana. 



[2—18510J (i) 



University Calendar, 1908-09 



FALL TERM. 



Sept. 22, Tuesday. Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Fall term. 
Sept. 23, Wednesday. Recitations and lectures begin. 

Nov. 26 and 27, Thursday 

and Friday. Thanksgiving recess. 

Dec 22, Tuesday, 6 p. m . Fall term ends. 

WINTER TERM. 

Jan. 5, Tuesday. Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Winter term. 
Jan. 6, Wednesday, Recitations and lectures begin. 

Jan. 20, Wednesday. Foundation day, a holiday. 

Mar. 26, Friday. 6 p. m. Winter term ends. 

SPRING TERM. 

April 6, Tuesday. Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Spring term. 
April 7, Wednesday. Recitations and lectures begin. 

June 18, Friday, 6 p. m. Spring terra ends. 

June 23, Wednesday. 10 a. m. University Commencement. 



Faculty and Officers 



COUNCIL OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

CARL H. ElGENMANN, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, Dean. 

Harold Whetstone Johnston, Ph.D., L.H.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.RTHUR Lej: Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and 
Social Science. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psy- 
chology. 

John Andrew Bergstrom, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

FACULTY OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

William Lowe Bryan, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University. 

Horace Addison Hoffman, A.M., Professor of Greek. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., Professor of American History and 
Politics. 

Robert Judson Aley, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Carl H. Eigexaiann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, and Director of 
the Biological Station. 

Harold Whetstone Johnston, Ph.D., L.H.D., Professor of Latin. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

David Myers Mother, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 

Albert Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance 
Languages. 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and 
Social Science. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psy- 
chology. 

John Andrew Bergstrom, Ph.D., Professor of Education, and Di- 
rector of the Psychological Laboratory. 

BURTON l>nini Myers, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Sam lel Baxxtster Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 



b INDIANA UNIVEBSITY 

Amos Shartle ITersiiey, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and 
International Law. 

Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

William A Rawles, Ph.D., Professor of Political Economy. 

Carl Wilhelm Ferdinand Ostiiaus, A.M., Professor of German. 

Schuyler Colfax Davisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Louis Sherman Davis, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Alfred Mansfield Brooks, A.M., Professor of Fine Arts. 

Warner Fite, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Augustus Grote Pohlman, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Henry Rihl Alburger, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

George Davis Morris, A.M., Associate Professor of French. 

Ernest Otto Holland, A.B., Professor of Education. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Guido Hermann Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative 
Philology. 

Rolla Roy Ramsey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology. 

Oliver W Brown, A.M., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Charles Zeleny. Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Frank Marion Andrews, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Lillian Gay Berry, A.B., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Henry Tiiew Stephenson, B.S., A.B., Associate Professor of 
English. 

Frank Aydelotte, A.M., B.Lit, Associate Professor of English. 

Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Edward Payson Morton, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 

Eugene Leser, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German. 

Ulysses Sherman Hanna, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

Joshua William Beede, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geology. 

.James M Van Hook, A.M., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Frank Curry Mathers, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor in Chemistry 

Thomas LeGranD Harris, A.M., Instructor in History. 

Vi i:\on' Andrew Suydam, B.S., Instructor in Mechanics. 

Charles FTaseman, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 



The Graduate School 



I. ITS HISTORY 

The Indiana University, situated at Bloomington, In- 
diana, is the State University of Indiana and the head of 
the public school system of the State. It takes its origin 
from the State Seminary, which was established by act of 
the Legislature, approved January 20, 1820. In 1828 the 
title of the Seminary was changed by the Legislature to 
that of the Indiana College ; and in 1838 the University 
was given its present name and style. In 1867 Indiana 
University became coeducational; and in 1886-87, under 
the leadership of President David Starr Jordan, there was 
a reorganization of the curriculum on the major subject 
and departmental basis. 

It consists at present of 

The College of Liberal Arts, organized in 1824. 

The Law School, organized in 1842, reorganized in 
1889. 

The School of Medicine, organized in 1903. 

The Graduate School, organized in 1904. 

Graduate work began and the first advanced degrees 
were offered in the early eighties, but a formal organiza- 
tion and segregation of the Graduate School was not 
effected till 1904. 

An outline of the scholarly work of the University to 
the time of the organization of the Graduate School will 
be found on pages 397-348 of the volume entitled 'Indiana 
University, 1820-1904'. About 4,000 titles of books and 
articles by members of the University are there listed. 



8 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

II. PURPOSE AND ADMINISTRATION 

The Graduate School furnishes opportunities for ad- 
vanced work leading to careers in higher education and 
in certain lines of investigation. It does not offer work 
leading to professional degrees in Law or in Medicine. 

The work of the School is a direct continuation of that 
of the College of Liberal Arts, and as such js the most 
advanced work in education undertaken by the State. 
The Graduate School stands, therefore, at the head of the 
University, and is the culmination of the public school 
system of the State. 

The school is administered by the Council of the Grad- 
uate School. It is composed of members of the Faculty 
representing different fields of learning. 

Not all Departments of the University are at present 
equally equipped for extended graduate work. In recog- 
nition of this fact, the amount and nature of the graduate 
work offered by the different Departments varies. Some 
Departments offer work for the A.M. degree only, while 
others offer work leading to the degree Ph.D. 

III. ADMISSION 

Students holding the degree A.B. from this institu- 
tion, or the same degree or its equivalent from similar 
educational institutions, are admitted to the Graduate 
School on presentation of the proper credentials. The 
requirements for the A.B. degree in Indiana University 
are the completion of the following courses: 

1. Two hours a week for three terms in English 
( '(imposition. 6 hours 

± Five hours a week for six terms in ancient or mod- 
ern (foreign) languages. ;> > () hours 



GRADUATE SCHOOL V 

:;. Five hours a week for three terms in college 
Mathematics (usually Algebra, Trigonometry, and Ana- 
lytical Geometry), or one year's work in Physics. 

15 hours 

4. Five hours a week for three terms in some science 
other than Physics. 15 hours 

5. Five hours a week for four and four-fifths terms, 
chosen from the Departments of History and Political 
Science. Economics and Social Science, English, Philos- 
ophy, Education, and Fine Arts. 24 hours 

6. A major subject consisting usually of nine terms' 
work, live hours a week, in one of the Departments of 
Liberal Arts. 45 hours 

7 Collateral work, designated by the head of the 
Department of the major subject, consisting usually of 
six terms' work, five hours a week. 30 hours 

8. A brief course in hygiene. 3 hours 

9. Elective work sufficient to make a total for the 
full course of twelve terms. 12 hours 

Total, 180 hours 

The unit of University credit is the "hour". An 
"hour "is one recitation or laboratory period per week 
carried during one term. The regular college year is 
divided into three terms. A Summer term of about equal 
length is provided in which some of the courses given 
during the regular year are repeated. 

Ordinarily a student will carry 15 hours per term and 
complete an undergraduate course in four years. 

AH graduates will enroll at the beginning of each 
term, and those entering regularly organized classes will 
submit to. the same regulations as undergraduate students. 
Work will in many cases be individual and not controlled 
by a recitation schedule. 



10 INDIANA LTNIVEKSITY 



IV. FEES 



Tuition in the University is free. A contingent fee of 
five dollars a term is charged all students. It covers in 
part the cost of the physical maintenance of the Univer- 
sity, and is not applied to the cost of tuition, which is 
provided wholly by the State. 

The Library fee is one dollar a term. 

The Laboratory fees are one dollar per credit hour in 
all courses. 

The Gymnasium fee, if the work in physical training 
is taken, is one dollar a term. 

An Examination fee of one dollar is charged for each 
make-up or special examination. This fee is paid to the 
Bursar, and his receipt when presented to the proper 
instructor constitutes his authorization for holding the 
examination. 

The fee for any Degree is five dollars, and must be 
paid to the Treasurer of the University at least thirty 
days before the granting of the degree, and a receipt for 
it filed with the Registrar.' 

V. EQUIPMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Buildings. The campus of the University adjoins the 
town, and contains about seventy acres of elevated 
ground, partly covered with a heavy growth of maple and 
beech. 

The University offices are in Maxwell Hall, a fireproof 
building of white limestone, erected in 1890, which, with 
an extension recently completed, also houses the School 
of Law. 

Owen Hall, a brick building erected in 1884, contains 
the museum, and the Lecture rooms and laboratories of the 
Departments of Zoology and Botany. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 11 

Wylie 1 1 (ill, also of brick, erected in 1884, contains the 
laboratories and lecture rooms of the Departments of 
Chemistry and Pathology, and the rooms of the Depart- 
ment of .Mathematics. 

K irk wood Hall, of white limestone, built in 1895, con- 
tains the rooms of the Departments of English, History, 
Economics, Greek, Latin, Romance Languages, and 
I rerman. 

Mitchell Hall is a frame building formerly used for the 
Women's Gymnasium. 

Kirk 'rood Observatory, completed in 1900, is a two-story 
building of white limestone, occupied by the Department 
of Mechanics and Astronomy. 

The lien's Gymnasium, a large frame building finished 
in 1896, is used also as an assembly hall for public exer- 
cises and entertainments. 

Science Hall, built in 1903 of limestone, is one of the 
largest buildings on the campus, and is occupied by the 
Departments of Physics, Philosophy, Education, Geology. 
Anatomy, and Physiology. 

The Library Building is just completed, and will house 
also the collections of the Department of Fine Arts. 

A Student Building of white limestone contains an east 
wing for men students, a west wing for women students 
(including the Women's gymnasium and swimming pool), 
and a small auditorium in the center seating 600 persons. 

For an account of the buildings of the Biological Sta- 
1 ion see under the Department of Zoology. 

The Library. The Library of Indiana University at 
present contains sixty-four thousand catalogued volumes. 
The selection of these books has been made by experts 
within the last twenty-two years with a view to facilitat- 
ing instruction and research. While the collection is a 
[.",—185191 



12 INDIANA [JNIVERSITY 

well-balanced one, it is especially strong in literary and 
scientific periodicals. The list of periodicals received and 
permanently kept on file by the library numbers about 
four hundred publications, including American, English, 
German, and French, and one each of Italian, Spanish, 
and Swedish. The library is 'made thoroughly usable by 
a carefully-made card catalogue, by indexes, and other 
bibliographical aids. The Library force consists of a li- 
brarian and ten assistants, all of whom are at the service 
of any authorized user of the library. 

In the library building are seminary rooms for the 
Departments of History, Economics, English, Philosophy, 
Romance Languages, Education, Latin and Greek. 

in addition to the central library where the general, 
literary, and historical collections are housed, there are 
nine departmental collections of varying sizes kept in the 
different University buildings. 

All books, with the exception of periodicals and books 
reserved for reference, may be drawn for home use, each 
student having the privilege of drawing three books for 
two weeks. 

The Library is open Mondays to Fridays from 7:45 
a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and Saturdays from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 
p.m. 

DEPARTMENTAL CLUBS 

The Physics Club, an organization of the teachers and 
advanced students of the Physics Department, meets fort- 
nightly to hear reports on research work and to discuss 
recent advances in physical science. 

A History Club, composed of the History faculty, 
seniors majoring in llislory, and such other students as 
may he elected to membership, meets fortnightly to <1 is- 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 13 

cuss topics of historical interest and to promote social 
intercourse. 

The Philosophy Club, composed of instructors and stu- 
dents of the Department of Philosophy, holds fortnightly 
meetings for the discussion of philosophical questions. 

The English Club, consisting of the English instruct- 
ors, students who have English as their major, and such 
other students as may be elected to membership, meets 
three times each term. The purpose of the club is to pro- 
mote good fellowship. 

The Euclidian Circle is a mathematical club made up 
of instructors and students above Freshman rank. Its 
meetings are held on the second and fourth Mondays of 
each month. 

The Goethe Gesellschaft is a club composed of men 
and women interested in German, and has for its object 
the practical study of the German language and the pro- 
motion of the social advantages of its members. 

The Cercle Francais, reorganized in 1905, is a club 
open to all members of the Department of Romance Lan- 
guages past the Freshman year, and twice a month holds 
social gatherings at which French alone is spoken. 

The Zoological Club, organized in 1882, meets every 
Monday during term time. 

The Geological Club, organized in 1907, meets on alter- 
nate Wednesdays during term time. 

VII. DEGREES 

Two advanced degrees, Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy, are conferred by the University. 

Master of Arts. The degree of Master of Arts may 
be conferred upon graduates of this University, or of any 
other institution of the same standing, upon the comple- 



14 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

tion in residence of fifteen hours a term, carried during 
at least one entire college year. Thirty of the total of 
forty- five hours must be in one Department, or in closely 
allied Departments. Fifteen hours must be distinctly 
graduate in character. 

Of the required year of residence, graduates of other 
institutions shall take at least two terms in succession. 

The Master's degree may be conferred upon graduates 
of this University upon the completion in absence of fif- 
teen hours a term, or equivalent work, carried during at 
least two full years under the direction of the Faculty. 
hours of private work done in absence being estimated 
at one-half the credit value of work done at the Univer- 
sity. 

Professional studies are not accepted for this degree, 
but research work on professional subjects may be ac- 
cepted at the option of the professor in charge of the 
major subject. 

A thesis may be required at the option of the profes- 
sor in charge of the major subject. 

Doctor of Philosophy. The degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy may be conferred upon graduates of this Univer- 
sity, or of any institution of similar character and rank, 
upon the completion of an advanced course of study of 
no less than three years. On the recommendation of the 
professor in charge of the major subject and with the con- 
currence of the Committee on Advanced Degrees, part of 
this time may be spent in study at other universities. 

The course of study for the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy niusl be pursued under the direction of a com- 
mittee consisting of the beads of the Departments in 
which the work is dene, and its value shall be determined 
by a final examination and by the presentation of a satis 



GKADtJATE SCHOOL 15 

factory thesis, usually embodying original work upon 
some prescribed or accepted subject, and which must al- 
ways give evidence that the candidate is capable of form- 
ing an independent judgment upon the recent literature 
of his department. In each case a detailed statement, 
indorsed by the professor in charge of the major work, 
shall be submitted to the Committee on Advanced Degrees 
nol Inter than May 10 of the year in which the candidate 
presents himself for examination. 

The thesis of every candidate for the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy shall be presented to the Committee on 
Advanced Degrees on or before the first day of June of 
the year in which he proposes to take the degree. The 
thesis shall be indorsed by the head of the Department 
as being in its tinal form and ready for the press. Exami- 
nations of each candidate for this degree will be con- 
ducted before a committee consisting of all the instructois 
under whom graduate work has been taken. If the can- 
didate is recommended for the degree, arrangements must 
be made to deposit live printed copies of the thesis in the 
library before the degree is conferred. 

At least one year before the final examination the can- 
didate shall satisfy the professor in charge of the major 
subject of his ability to use French and German for pur- 
poses of investigation. 

VIII. APPLICATION FOR DEGREES 

Application for the degree Master of Arts must be 
filed with the Dean at least three months before the time 
when the degree is to be given. Application for the de- 
gree Doctor of Philosophy must be on file at least one year 
before the candidate is admitted to the examination. 



16 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

IX. SCHOLARSHIPS AND TEACHING FELLOWSHIPS 

A number of scholarships and teaching fellowships are 
available for graduate students. 

Scholars will be given an opportunity to gain a fa- 
miliarity with the departmental work and administration 
which can not be obtained in any of the regular courses. 
To this end the scholar may be given an opportunity to 
assist in laboratory courses, to supervise departmental 
libraries and to assist in museum administration. Schol- 
ars, aside from being relieved from the payment of all 
contingent and laboratory fees, will receive no remunera- 
tion. 

Teaching Fellows will be required to render service to 
the University as assistants, tutors, or instructors. 

The Teaching Fellows are relieved from all term fees 
and the fellowship carries witli it an honorarium of be- 
tween .i>200.00 and $500.00 annually. The highest amount 
will ordinarily be paid only if the incumbent is appointed 
for a third year. A Teaching Fellowship is primarily a 
recognition of scholarship. Not less than two-thirds of 
each Fellow's time must be devoted to work leading to 
the Doctorate in Philosophy. 

A Fellow may be appointed for three separate years, 
but not for more. Appointments are for one year, and 
do not imply a reappointment. 

Following is the lis! of Teaching Fellows for 1907-08: 

Charles Burgess Austin, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Economics. 
William Alli \ Austin, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics, 
Joseph Valentine Brettwieser, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Philos- 
ophy. 
Albert Harvey Cole, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Public Speaking. 
Anna Brockman Collins, A. P., Critic Teacher in English. 
Mas Mapes Ellis, A. P.. Teaching Fellow in Zoology. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 17 

Walter Lewis Uaiin, A.M., Teaching Follow in Zoology and Assist- 
ant in the Museum. 
Lewis Lkroy Hall, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 
Cecilia Barbara LIennel, A.B., Teaching Fellow in English. 

CORA Barbara Hennel, Teaching Fellow in Mathematics. 

Mary Horner, A.B., Teaching Fellow in German. (Spring term.) 

George Alexander Hutchinson, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Philos- 
ophy. 

Ballixgtox Charles Kettleborougii, A.B., Teaching Fellow in 
History. (Winter and Spring terms.) 

Robert Kuiper, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Latin. 

Isaac McKixxey Lewis, A.M., Teaching Fellow in Botany. 

Walter D. Martin, B.S., M.D., Teaching Fellow in Pathology. 

Arthur Leroy Murray. A.B., Teaching Fellow in English. 

Paul Christian Phillips, A.B., Teaching Fellow in History. (Fall 
term.) 

Will Scott, A.B., Research Assistant in charge of Donaldson Farm. 

Arthur Bivins Stonex, A.M., Teaching Fellow in English. 

Ax drew Texnant Wylie, A.M., Teaching Fellow in English. 



Departmental Equipments and Courses of 

Study 



Besides advanced work the lists which follow include 
also brief statements of the undergraduate courses. These 
will be found fully described in the Catalogue of the Uni- 
versity. Entrance to the graduate studies in any Depart- 
ment, unless otherwise stated, implies the completion of 
45 hours selected from the undergraduate courses here 
listed. In many cases some of the advanced undergradu- 
ate courses can profitably be taken by graduate students. 

DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

Horace A. Hoffman, Professor. 

Frank W. Tilden, Associate Professor. 

Undergraduates choosing Greek as their major sub- 
ject are required to take sixty hours' work in the Depart- 
ment, selected after consultation with the professor. 

The time that at the present may be profitably devoted 
to graduate work in Greek is one year, leading to the de- 
gree of A.M. 

The Department is well equipped for doing thoroughly 
satisfactory work leading to the degree of Master of Arts. 
Besides the most important reference books, cyclopaedias, 
dictionaries, lexicons, indexes, and standard editions of 
Greek writers, an effort lias been made to build up an es- 
pecially good collection of works 1 renting of Euripides, 
since seminary work is oiXennl in that- author', 'flic De- 
partment has the chief older editions as well as nearly all 

(18) 



GRADUATE SCI 1 00 1, 19 

of the later onos. and many special works bearing on 
Euripides. 

The Library contains the most important classical 
journals, among them complete sets of 'The American 
Journal of Philology'; 'The American Journal of Arehae- 
ology'; 'The Classical Review'; Chicago, Cornell, and 
Harvard Studies; 'Hermes'; 'Jahrbucher fur classische 
Philologie'; Mittheilungen d. deutsch. arch. Inst, in 
Atlien"; 'Philologus'; and 'Rheinisches Museum.' 

Among the most valuable works in the field of Archae- 
ology and Art the following may be named: 'Antike 
Denkmaler'; 'Ausgrabungen von Olympia'; 'Carapanos'; 
k Dodona'; Hamdey-Bey and Reinach's 'Necropole a 
Sidon'; Homolle's 'Fouilles de Delphes'; Ohnefalsch- 
Richter's 'Cypros, die Bibel und Homer'; Overbeck's 
'Griechische Kunstmythologie' ; Stackelberg's 'Die Gra- 
ber der Hellenen'; and the publications of the American 
and British Schools at Athens, and of the Egyptian Ex- 
ploration Fund. Among the works on Inscriptions and 
Epigraphy the following may be mentioned: 'Corpus 
Inscriptionum Graecarum'; 'Corpus Inscriptionum At- 
tiearum'; Inscr. Graec. Septentrionalis, Siciliae, Italiae, 
Pelopon., Insularum, etc., and the important writings of 
such authorities as Klein, Kretschmer, Meisterhans, etc. 
For Palaeography and the study of the Papyri are the 
following: Works by Grenfell, Hunt, Kenyon, Mahaffy, 
Mayser, Mitteis, Thompson and Wilkin. In the import- 
ant field of vase-painting, the Library contains many valu- 
able vorks. Among the most noteworthy are: Benn- 
dorf's 'Griechische und Sicilische Vasenbilder' ; Collignon 
and Rayet's 'Ristoire de la Ceramique grecque'; Deche- 
Lette's 'Les Abases ceramiques ornes de la Gaule romaine'; 
F\irtwangler and Loeschke's 'Mykenisehe Vasen/ and 

14—18511) J 



20 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

' Mykenische Thongef asse ' : Furtwangler and Reichho-lcTs 
'Griechische A^asenmalerei 1 ; Harrison & McColl's 'Types 
of Green Vases,' and various books by Gardner, Hud- 
dilston, Klein, Kretschmer, Murray, Smith and Walters. 
The Department also owns upwards of 700 photo- 
graphs of landscapes, buildings and works of art in 
Greece, Italy and Sicily; and has many lantern-slides, 
busts, casts, a model of the Acropolis at Athens, and a 
series of reproductions of the famous Tanagra Figurines. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 
1. Elementary Greek. 15 hours. 

3. Xenophon : 'Ilelleniea'. 3 hours. 

4. Xenophon : Anabasis, Composition. 2 hours. 
5a. Homer : 'Iliad'. Selected portions. G hours. 
56. Euripides : 'The Medea'. 3 hours. 

6a-. Selected Prose Readings. 2 hours. 

G&. Homer : 'Odyssey'. 2 hours. 

9. Lyric and Dramatic Poetry. 15 hours. 

12. Philosophical Prose. G hours. 

13. Historical and Rhetorical Prose. 9 hours. 

14. Greek Life. 3 hours. 

1G. Greek Words in English. 3 hours. 

17. Greek Testament and Church Fathers. 9 hours. 

15. Greek Literature in English. hours. 

COURSE FOR GRADUATES 

15. Graduate Seminary: Euripides. A. Wednesdays: 'The Phe- 
nicians'. Professor HOFFMAN. It. Fridays: 'The Alces- 
iis\ Associate Professor TlLDEN. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, \Y. P., 3:00 to 5:00. 
Open to graduates only. A reading knowledge of German is a 
requisite U>f the work. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 21 

DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

Harold Whetstone Johnston, Professor of Latin. 
Lillian Gay Berry, Associate Professor. 
■ — , Instructor. 

The Department is adequately equipped for the 
courses offered below. Besides sets of Classical journals 
and reviews (see the detailed statement above under the 
Department of Greek), the library contains the essential 
works of reference on the various disciplines, all general 
and special lexicons and indexes of recognized value, 
various sets of texts, the latest critical editions and com- 
mentaries, together with many of historical interest, and 
collections of monographs and dissertations intended to 
illustrate those authors that are made the subjects of 
special investigation and seminary work. The Depart- 
ment has an office and two recitation rooms in Kirkwood 
Hall, and shares with the Department of Greek a semi- 
nary room in the Library. The private library of the 
head of the Department is at the service of graduate 
students. 

The following courses are offered : 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

11. Cicero, Livy, and Terence. 9 hours. 

12. Composition. 3 hours. 

13. Private Antiquities. 3 hours. 

26. Horace, Tacitus, and Pliny. 9 hours. 

27. Grammar. 3 hours. 

28. Paleography and Criticism. 3 hours. 

31. History of Literature. 3 hours. 

32. Epigraphy. 3 hours. 



22 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES. 

:;::. The Prose Writers of the Republic. Selections from Cato, 
Sallust, Cicero, and Mirtius, with the critical study of the 
text of one of these authors so far as it is read in the class. 
Students are expected to be able to read German. Professor 
Johnston. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 0:00. 

[34. The Poets of the Republic. Selection from Plautus, Terence. 
Lucretius, and Catullus, with the critical study of the text 
of some one of these authors so far as read in the class. 
Courses 33 and 34 are given in alternate years.] 
Omitted in 1908-00. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

If Course 33 is taken in the undergraduate course, 
Course 34 should be made a part, of the graduate work, 
and vice versa. 

41. The Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. Recitations, 

lectures, and assigned readings. Associate Professor BERKY. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be 

arranged. 
Platner, Ancient Rome'. 
Open to graduate students only. 

42. Readings in Latin Literature. The student will be guided and 

assisted in reading very considerable portions of those au- 
thors not included in other courses, with stress laid upon the 
subject matter rather than upon the language and style. An- 
alyses and summaries will be prepared by the students and 
criticised by the instructor. Professor Johnston and Asso- 
ciate Professor Berry. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be 
arranged. 

Open to graduate students only. 

I.'!. Advanced Composition. This course is intended especially for 

teachers, hut may be taken by, any persons who need practice 
in writing Latin. Professor .Johnston and Mr. . 



GBADUATE SCHOOL 23 

I'.ill. Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be 

Open u» graduates and teachers of Latin. 

50. Seminary. The critical study of the text of some standard 
author, with incidental investigation of problems in syntax, 
style, prosody, and so forth. In past years Caesar, Sallust, 
Tacitus, and Plautus have been made the subjects of similar 
work. In 1908-09 it is proposed to make a study of Terence. 
The student should be provided with the critical edition of 
Umpfenbach and the text editions of Dziatzko and Fleck- 
eisen. Professor Johnston. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., 2:00 to 3:50. 

Open to students who have had one year's graduate work. 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Albert F. Kuersteiner, Professor of Romance Languages. 
George D. Morris, Associate Professor of French. 
*Ciiarles A. Mosemiller, Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages. 

Undergraduates electing Romance Languages as their 
major subject are required to take sixty hours of work in 
the Department. The choice of courses must be approved 
by the head of the Department. 

The Department offers one year of Graduate work, all 
in French. 

The Library is well equipped with works in French 
criticism. It contains, moreover, all of the volumes of the 
'Grands Ecrivains de la France' series published thus far, 
and complete sets of 'Romania,' 'Archiv fiir das Studium 
der Xeueren Sprachen,' 'Franzosische Studien,' 'Revue des 
deux Mondes, ' 'Revue de Cours et Conferences,' 'Bib- 
lioteca de Autores Espaholes,' besides a fair selection of 
works in French and Spanish literature. A complete set 



To be absent on leave, for one year, from August 1, 1908. 



24 TNDIANA UNIVERSITY 

of the 'Zeitschrift fiir Romanische Philologie, ' belonging 
to the he-ad of the Department, is also at the disposal of 
students. 

Professor C. A. Mosemiller has published in 'Modern 
Language Notes' the following articles: November, 1903, 
'Etymology of son': February, 1904, 'Etymology of can- 
neberge'; December, 1905, 'Etymology of mache-fer'; 
May, 1907, 'Etymologies of cotret, deche, palier, sabliere'; 
May, 1908, 'Trumeau, trumer, trimer et quelques autres 
derives du latin torus en Gaule. ' 

Following are the courses of the Department : 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Elementary French. 15 hours. 

1. Grammar and Composition. C> hours. 

19. Second Year Reading. 9 hours. 

7. Seventeenth Century Poetry and Drama. 9 hours. 

11. Seventeenth Century Prose. 6 hours. 

24. Eighteenth Century Poetry and Drama. 9 hours. 

25. Eighteenth Century Prose. G hours. 

10. Nineteenth Century ; the Romantic Period. 9 hours. 

27. Nineteenth Century ; the Realistic Period. 9 hours. 

26. Advanced Composition. 6 hours. 
15. Elementary Spanish. 15 hours. 

20. Advanced Spanish. 9 hours. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

L3. Old French. Reading of texts; study of derivations, and an 
exposition of the simpler phonetic laws involved in the 
change from Popular Latin into Old French and Modern 
French. Lectures. Professor Kuersteineb. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 9:00. 



u i; a hi a i i; Miioui. 6o 

Paris, 'Extraits de la Chanson de Roland'; Suchier, 'Aucassio 
et Nicolete' (French edition); Paris-Langlois, 'Chrestoma- 
thie dn Moyen Age'. 

Open to graduate Students who have studied French and Latin, 
and also to undergraduates who have passed in Courses 
I and 19. 

[28. Senior Composition. Drill in translation of literary English 

into literary French. Writing of French themes and letters. 

The work is conducted in French. Associate Professor 

Mosemii.t.kk. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 3 :00. 
Open to students who have passed in Courses 1, 4, and 2G, or 

their equivalent.] 
Omitted in 11)08-09. 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Bert J. Vos, Professor. 

Carl Osthaus, Professor. 

Eugene Leser, Assistant Professor. 

Undergraduates who choose German as their major 
subject must make a minimum of sixty hours' credit in 
this Department, the equivalent of a four years' course of 
five hours a week. They are expected to consult with the 
head of the Department in the selection of their other 
studies, as well as in the arrangement of their work within 
the Department. 

Courses 6, 8, 9, 10, and 14, and Education 13 (German) 
constitute the fourth year Avork. The courses in Gothic, 
Old High German, and Middle High German, given in the 
Department of Comparative Philology, will count as 
graduate, or (under certain conditions), as fourth year 
courses in German. 



26 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Elementary German. 15 hours. 

'2. Second Year Composition. 6 hours. 

o. Classical German Authors. 9 hours. 

4. Modern German Authors, 9 hours. 

5. Third Year Composition. 6 hours. 

7. Advanced German Classics. 9 hours. 
1G. German Lyric Poetry. 6 hours. 

8. Advanced Composition. 6 hours. 

6. History of German Literature. 9 hours. 

9. Goethe : 'Faust'. 9 hours. 

10. History of German Literature. G hours. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

14. German Usage. A study of difficult points in German gram- 
mar, with reference to the spoken language of the present 
day and to the usage of representative authors. Designed 
especially for students who intend to teach German. Assist- 
ant Professor Leser. 

Winter and Spring' terms, T. Th., at an hour to be appointed. 

Matthias, 'Sprachleben und Sprachschaden'. 

Open to students who have had the equivalent of three years' 
work in German. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

For Gothic, Old Eigh German, and Middle High Ger- 
man, see Course 4, of the Department of Comparative Phil- 
ology. Course 14 may be taken either as a gradual e or 
undergraduate course. 

I L9. German Romanticism. Lectures, discussions, and reports. Con- 
ducted in German. 
Fill. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., al L0:CK). 



GB LDUATE SCHOOL 27 

open to students who have had the equivalent of four years' 

work in German.] 
Omitted in 1908-09. 

[20. Lessing: Life and Works. Lectures, and reports by members 
of the class upon subjects assigned for special study. Con- 
ducted in German. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

Open to students who have had the equivalent of four years' 
work in German.] 

Omitted in 1908-00. 

[21. Studies in the recent German Drama. Conducted in German. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8 :00. 
Open to students who have had the equivalent of four years' 

work in German.] 
Omitted in 1908-00. 

22. Seminary in German Literature. Goethe's Lyrical Poems ; 
Schiller's Dramas. Professor Vos. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at an hour to be arranged. 
Open to students who have had the equivalent of four years' 
work in German. 



DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY 

Glido II. Stempel, Associate Professor. 

The degree of A.B. in Comparative Philology may be 
conferred upon students who have a grounding in at least 
two foreign languages. The major requirement will be 
forty-five hours in this Department, including Courses 1 
and 2. 

The graduate courses offered will be extended as re- 
quired. They may be supplemented by certain of the 
courses listed as undergraduate, as well as by certain 
courses given in the other language Departments and in 
History, Social Science (anthropology), Philosophy, and 
1 5—18519] 



28 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

English. The lime that can profitably be spent here in 
graduate study in philology is at present about two years. 
The University Library contains about 2,000 volumes 
of philology. Upwards of fifty languages are repre- 
sented, and a third of these have their history and cognate 
relationships fully illustrated. The chief philological 
periodicals and many of the other serial publications are 
on the shelves, quite generally in complete files. It may 
perhaps be said that the student of philology has access 
to a fairly compfete working library. 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

1. The English Language. 9 hours. 

2. Old English. hours. 

3. Middle English. G hours. 

6. Ballad and Epic. G hours. 

7. The Latin Language. G hours. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

4. Comparative Philology of the Germanic Dialects. One or two 

of the dialects— Gothic, Old Norse, Old Saxon, Old and Mid- 
dle High German — will he studied with reference to English 
and (if the constituency of the class admits) German. Gram- 
mar and reading, linguistic interpretation, and reports on 
such special topics as mythology, customs, traditions, the be- 
ginnings of national life, etc. Associate Professor Stempel. 

Fall, AVinter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10 :00. 

Wright, 'Primer of the Gothic Language'; Sweet, 'Icelandic 
Primer'; ETolthausen, 'Altsiichsisches Elementarbuch' ; 
Wright, 'Old High German Primer'; Wright, 'Middle High 
German Primer'; Zarncke, 'Das Nibelungenlied' ; selected 
monographs from Paul, 'Grundriss der germanischen Phil 

ologh''. 

Open to students who have passed in Courses - and .'», and in 
thirty hours of language, and to others ;ii the option of the 
instructor. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 29 

5. Comparative Philology of the Classical Languages. An ad- 
vanced course in the science of language and Indo-European 
philology. Each student will emphasize the particular lan- 
guage in which he has bad special training. Associate Pro- 
fessor Stempel. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

Giles, '.Manual of Comparative Philology for Classical Stu- 
dents'. 

Open to students who have passed in Courses 2 and 3, and in 
thirty hours of language, and to advanced students in Latin 
or Greek. 

[8. Sanskrit. Elements of grammar, reading of selected texts, and 
comparative study of sounds and inflections. Mr. . 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10 :00. 

Thumb, 'Handbuch des Sanskrit, I' ; Lanman, 'Sanskrit 
Reader'. 

Open to Seniors and graduate students in Comparative Philol- 
ogy or the languages.] 

Omitted in 1008-09. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Will D. Howe, Professor of English. 
*Charles J. Sembower, Associate Professor of English. 
Henry T. Stephenson, Associate Professor of English. 
Frank Aydelotte, Associate Professor of English. 
Edward P. Morton, Assistant Professor of English. 

Undergraduate students who select the work of this 
Department for their major subject must take forty-five 
hours in English and thirty hours of collateral work ap- 
proved by the Department. Not more than fifteen hours 
of Public Speaking may be taken as collateral. 

At present, two years may be spent with profit in pur- 
suing the work which will lead toward the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. The Library is equipped for re- 



♦Ahsent on leave, from August 1. 1907. 



30 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

search work in several periods, is well provided with the 
principal periodicals and with the publications of most of 
the learned societies. The instructors of the Department 
will gladly direct competent advanced students in lines 
of investigation and research. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Elementary Composition. 6 hours. 
11. Composition. G hours. 

15. Advanced Composition. 6 hours. 

2. History and Development of English Literature. 9 hours. 
6. Literary History of America. 9 hours. 

3. Nineteenth Century Prose. G hours. 

20. Shakspere, Milton, Spenser, Browning, Tennyson. 9 hours. 
39. The Novel. G hours. 

4. Burns, Wordsworth, Scott, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats. 

9 hours. 

9. Elizabethan Drama. 9 hours. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

[17. Metrics. A study of modern English metre.] 
Omitted in 190S-09. 

[33. Literary Criticism. A study of the history and principles of 
literary criticism. Lectures and reports.] 
Omitted in 1908-09. 

[41. The Anglo-Saxon Period. A historical survey of the literature 
from its beginnings to Chaucer's time. Discussion of Anglo- 
Saxon prose and poetry, and the literary forms of Middle 
English literature.] 

Fall term, T. Th., at; 0:00. 

(Unit ted in 1908-09. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 31 

12. Chancer. 'Piers Plowman', and other Contemporary works. 
Reading of the minor poems, 'Troilus and Cressida', five or 
six of the "Canterbury Tales' by Chaucer; a text of 'Piers 
Plowman', and other selections from the period. Associate 
Professor AYDELOTTE. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

4.".. The Elizabethan Age: Non-dramatic. From the appearance 
of TottePs '.Miscellany' (1557) to the closing- of the theaters 
(1042). A study of the various literary forms and works 
i exclusive of the drama) of the Elizabethan period, with 
especial emphasis upon Spenser, Sidney, Bacon, Jonson, 
Hooker. Lyly, Greene, Lodge, Nash, Dekker. The pamphlets 
of the time will especially be considered. Associate Pro- 
fessor Aydelotte. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10 :00. 

[44. The Age of Milton and the Age of Dryden (1642-1700). A 
study of the lyric poets of the Caroline period, of the Res- 
toration drama, and of the chief works in prose in the sev- 
enteenth century. 

Winter term, T. Th., at 9:00.J 

Omitted in 1908-00. 

45. The Eighteenth Century (1700-1770). A study of the rise of 
prose, the essay, the magazine, the novel, and the beginnings 
of romanticism, with especial regard to Addison, Steele, 
Swift, Defoe, Pope, Jonson, Goldsmith, Gray. Lectures and 
collateral reading. Each student will prepare one long paper 
^ach term. Professor Howe. 
Fall and Winter terms, T. Th., at 9:00. 

40. The Romantic Period, to the death of Scott (1770-1832). The 
literature of the romantic period in its various forms. An 
attempt will be made to present the new movement as it de- 
veloped in England, France, and Germany. Special stress 
will be laid upon Burns, Wordsworth, Scott, Coleridge, 
Byron, and Shelley. Professor TTowe. 
Spring term, T. Th., at 9 :00. 



32 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

[47. The Victorian Period (1832-1900). A survey of the literary 
movements in England and America during the nineteenth 
century, with much reading from representative authors. 

Spring term, T. Th., at 9:00.] 

Omitted in 1908-09. 

35. Composition Seminary. A course in writing, restricted to those 
who have passed with distinction in Course 15. Professor 
Howe, Associate Professors Stephenson and Aydelotte. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours one afternoon each 
week. 

12. Literary Seminary. Research Course. Sections limited to fif- 
teen students will be formed to study various literary prob- 
lems. In 1907-08 the following subjects were discussed : 
The Arthurian story in its various forms ; the beginnings of 
the English drama ; the dramas of Browning ; the question 
of literary appreciation and interpretation. Sections will be 
directed by Professor Howe, and Associate Professors Ste- 
phenson and Aydelotte. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours, one afternoon each 
week. 

25. Biblography of English Literature. This course will present 
rapidly the subject of English literature from its bibliograph- 
ical side. Professor Howe, Associate Professors Stephen- 
son and Aydelotte, and Assistant Professor Morton. 
Spring term, two hours. 

48. Courses of Special Study. The Department will encourage 
special study in the literature of any period or in topics 
which may be pursued with profit. 



<;i; \hi' \ TE SCHOOL 33 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 
James A. WooDBUiiN, Professor ol r American History and Politics. 
Samuel P>. Harding, Professor of European History. 
Amos S. Hershey, Professor oi' Political Science and International 
Law. 
*Thomas ti. Harris, instructor. 
Solon J. "Ruck. Instructor. 

Undergraduates selecting the work of this Department 
for their major subject must take forty-five hours in 
History and thirty hours collateral work approved by the 
Department. The latter must include Course 1 of the De- 
partment of Economics, and may include a maximum of 
fifteen hours selected from the courses in Political Science 
offered by this Department. 

The Department is prepared to offer research wor& 
leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. in the following fields: 
American Colonial History, the American Civil War and 
Reconstruction. English History in the Seventeenth and 
Nineteenth Centuries, the French Revolution, Diplomatic 
History, and International Law. In each of these fields 
good library collections are already at hand, and are con- 
stantly being added to. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Mediaeval and Modern European History : Introductory Course. 
9 hours. 

'2. Greek History. G hours. 
[3. Roman History. hours. Omitted in 1908-01).] 

6. English History. '.) hours. 
10. History of Modern Europe. G hours. 

8. American Colonial History. G hours. 
18. American Political History, 1783-1876. ( .) hours. 
21. The American Commonwealth, i) hours. 
23. European Politics. G hours. 



*<>,, leave of absence, H)08-0!). 



M INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

'.). Renaissance and Reformation, 1800-1555. Lectures, text-book 
study, collateral reading, and preparation of payers. The 
conciliar movement for reform ; the Renaissance in Italy and 
Germany; the Protestant revolution in Germany, Switzerland, 
and France ; the Council of Trent and the counter-reforma- 
tion ; the religious peace of Augsburg. Professor Harding. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W., at 11 :00. 

Should be accompanied by Fine Arts 4, F., at 11 :00. 

13. France in the Middle Ages. A study of the institutions of 
mediaeval France, and of the processes whereby the feudal 
type of society was transformed into the modern state. Lec- 
tures, collateral reading, and reports on assigned topics. Pro- 
fessor Harding. 
Fall and Winter terms, T. Th., at 11:00. 

16. Historical Method. The principles of historical investigation, 
with some practice in the use of sources and the preparation 
of papers. Professor Harding. 

Spring term, T. Th., at 9 :00. 

Langlois and Seignobos's 'Introduction to the Study of His- 
tory'; book of texts to be selected. 

22. American Diplomatic History, 177G-187G. A study of the sub- 
jects of chief importance in the international relations of the 
United States from the time of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. Mr. Buck. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8 :00. 

28. American Political Discussions. A study of some of the more 
notable contributions to political and constitutional contro- 
versies in the national period of American history. Designed 
to introduce the student to a first-hand knowledge of the 
materials relating to the leading issues in our national de- 
velopment. Professor Woodimjrn. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at :00. 
Presupposes Course 18 or its equivalent. 

20a. Seminary in English History. Individual research work, under 
the guidance of the instructor, on some subject connected 
willi modern English history. The results of the investiga- 



GBADUATE SCHOOL 35 

tions arc presented from time to time as reports and are 
finally embodied in papers in form suitable for publication, 
of which a copy must be left with the Seminary. Professor 
Harding. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Hours for individual confer- 
ence to be arranged. 

20c. Seminary in American Constitutional and Political History. In 
1908-00 the period of the Civil War will be studied. Study 
of the sources, reports of investigations, and thesis work. 
Professor Woodburn. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 4 :00 to 5 :30. 

Open to advanced students and graduates. 

21. History of Political Ideas and Theory of the State. A study 
of the nature, origin, form, and functions of the state, to- 
gether with an analysis of the structure and province of gov- 
ernment. A brief sketch or outline of the history of political 
ideas or theories will also be given. Professor Hersiiey. 

Spring term, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 

Open to students who have passed in Course 23, or have had 
the equivalent of two years' work in History, Law, or Eco- 
nomics. 

Pollock, 'History of Political Ideas' ; Leacock, 'Elements of 
Political Science.' 

2."). Public International Law. Subjects of international law ; rights 
and duties of states in their normal relations ; intervention ; 
principles governing states in time of war ; the law of neu- 
trality ; territorial property and jurisdiction ; territorial 
waters ; high seas ; contraband ; blockade, etc. Text-book 
work, lectures, and the study of cases and illustrations drawn 
from the Russo-Japanese War. Intended primarily for the 
Third year class in the School of Law, and Seniors and 
graduate students in history. Professor Hershey. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at an hour to be ap 
pointed. 

Lawrence, 'International Law'; Hershey, 'The International 
Law and Diplomacy of the Russo-Japanese War', 

[G— 1S510J 



36 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

20(7. Seminary in International Law and Diplomacy. Research work 
and the special study of important topics, more especially 
of present day problems. During recent years such sub- 
jects were selected as the Alabama Claims, the Panama 
Affair, the causes of the Russo-Japanese War, the 'Open 
Door' policy in China, and the genesis of the Monroe Doc- 
trine. Professor Herstiey. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 

Open to Seniors and graduate students. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Ulysses G. Weatherly, Professor of Economics and Social Science. 
William A, Rawles, Professor of Political Economy. 

Undergraduates selecting Economics and Social 
Science as their major subject are required to take nine 
terms of daily work (forty-five hours) in the Department. 
Of the elective work in other Departments at least three 
terms should be in History and Political Science, and it 
is strongly urged that one course of this work be taken in 
the Freshman year, before the work in Economics is 
begun. 

The courses in the Department fall into two groups, 
adjusted to the needs of those students whose interest lies 
primarily in the field of Economics or of those who wish 
to work chiefly in Sociology. The graduate work in both 
lines centers in Courses 8 and 8a. The Department Li- 
brary is equipped with full sets of the most important 
public documents, both slate and national, and has com- 
plete sets of most of the American, English, French and 
German economic periodicals. Advanced students have 
direct access to these materials, and also to the special 
collections relating to charitable and correctional institu- 
tions. The Department is affiliated with the Charity Or- 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 37 

ganization Society of [ndianapoliSj and through this 
means properly qualified students are enabled to eome 
into direct contact with the social and economic problems 
of that city. Constant use is also made of the statistical 
materials in the various departments of the State govern- 
ment, and also in the State Library. 

The following courses are designed to furnish the work 
for the Master's Degree. In certain cases a second year 
of graduate study may be taken with advantage. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Political Economy. 6 hours. 

2. Economic History of England. 2 hours. 

15. Economic History of the United States. 4 hours. 

12. Principles of Commerce. 3 hours. 

13. Commercial Geography. 3 hours. 

25. Accounting and Business Practice. hours. 

27. Business Organization and Management. 3 hours. 

28. Insurance. 3 hours. 

20. Corporation Economics. 9 hours. 
COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

G. Money, Banking, and the Money Market. ( 1 ) Fall term : 
Money. General monetary principles and such special sub- 
jects as bimetallism, the standard of deferred payments, and 
the present monetary situation in the United States. (2) 
Winter term : Banking. History and theory of banking 
and credit operations, followed by a study of the banking 
systems of the leading foreign states, and of the recent pro- 
posals of banking reforms in the United States. (3) Spring 
term : The Money Market. A study of the rates of dis- 
count and exchange (domestic and foreign), the functions of 
bill brokers, international payments, financial panics and 
crises, financial aspects of stock and produce exchanges, and 



88 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

London and New York as centers of financial operations. 

Lectures, text-books, and special reports. Professor Kawi.ks. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 

3. Public Finance. A study of the revenues and expenditures of 
t lie various political units, local, state, and national, and the 
leading features of financial administration, taxation, and 
public debts. A detailed study will be made of the tax sys- 
tem of Indiana. The financial history of the United States, 
with especial attention to the currency, taxation, and bank- 
ing institutions. Lectures, text-books and collateral read- 
ings. Professor Pawles. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 8:00. 

9. Transportation. An historical survey of the means and meth- 
ods of transportation, followed by a study of the economic 
and social bearings of the present transportation question. 
Professor Kawles. . 
Spring term, M. W. F., at 9:00. 

20. Ethnology. The origin and antiquity of man ; physical charac- 

teristics of race as a basis of race classification ; social and 
psychic characteristics in relation to material civilization ; 
race geography. Professor Weatiiekly. 
Fall term, T. 'Ph., at 10 :00. 

21. Comparative Sociology: The problem of the family. Historical 

evolution of the family ; types of marriage and of kinship ; 
present status of opinion as to the primitive family; the di- 
vorce problem, and the economic and social position of woman. 
Professor Weatherly. 
Winter term, T. Th., at 10 :00. 

2'>. Demography of the United States. Racial ingredients of the 
national population ; problems of race contact and assimila- 
tion ; special problems connected with immigration and natu- 
ralization; the negro problem; the movements of population. 
Professor Weatherly. 
Spring term, T. Th., at 10:00. 

[a. Social Pathology: Pauperism and charities. A general intro- 
duction to the study of the degenerate classes; the causes of 
dependence; a comparative study of modem modi's of dealing 



GRADUATE school 39 

with the defective and dependent classes; charity organization, 
.Hid the most recent developments in preventive philanthropy. 
Professor Weatherly. 
Fall term, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

\b. Social Pathology : Crime and penology. Nature and causes of 
crime; an examination of criminal anthropology; the his- 
torical development of penology ; the reformatory system, the 
juvenile court and probation system; the leading problems of 
criminal jurisprudence. The class will make a two days' 
visit to the benevolent and penal institutions at Indianapolis. 
Professor Weatherly. 
Winter term, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

Open to third and fourth year students in Economics, History, 
Philosophy, and Law. 

4c. Social Pathology : Special problems. In 1908-09 the subject 
of the course will be the liquor problem and social betterment. 
Other topics to be taken up from year to year will be indus- 
trial betterment, and the special questions of municipal so- 
ciology. Professor Weatherly. 
Spring term, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

10. Socialism and Social Reform. A historical study of Utopian 
social philosophy and of the growth of scientific socialism ; 
the origin and present position of Marxian socialism ; Ameri- 
can communistic experiments and movements for radical so- 
cial reform. Professor Weatherly. 
Fall term, T. Th., at 11:00. 

1G. Industrial Society. An examination of certain recent theories 
of distribution with special reference to their bearing on the 
social aspects of industry ; in the study of the questions at 
issue between capital and labor emphasis is laid on the grow- 
ing recognition of society's paramount interest. Professor 
Weatherly. 
Winter term, T. Th.. at 11 :00. 

7. General Sociology. A summary of social forces and an attempt 
to formulate certain principles of social action ; a careful 
analysis and criticism is made of those trends of sociological 



40 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

speculation which give most promise of being permanently 
fruitful. Professor Weatherly. 
Spring term, T. Th., at 11:00. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

S. Seminary in Economics and Sociology. Designed for advanced 
students who have shown the ability to undertake individual 
research. The subjects for investigation may be taken from 
the field of either Economics or Sociology, but it is intended 
that they shall have some degree of unity. Considerable 
attention is given to training in statistical methods. Each 
member is expected to prepare a thesis exhibiting the results 
of original research. Professors Weatherly and Rawles. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week, at an hour 
to be appointed. 

8a. Research. Special investigations upon economic or sociological 

subjects, directed toward the preparation of theses for the 

Master's degree. Hours and credit by individual arrange- 
ment. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Ernest II. Lindley, Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 

Warner Fite, Professor of Philosophy. 

William L. Bryan, Lecturer on Ethics. 

John A. Bergstrom, Professor of Education and Director of 

the Psychological Laboratory. 
Joseph V. Breitwieser, Teaching Fellow. 
George A. Hutchinson, Teaching Fellow. 

No courses in this Department are open to Freshmen 
at the beginning of the College year. By special permis- 
sion, Freshmen may be admitted to Course 3 (Winter and 
Spring terms), and to Course la (Spring term). All 
undergraduates are, however, strongly advised to defer 
election of work in this Department until the Sophomore 
year or later. 

For students who take their major subject in this De- 
partment, the required work consists of Courses 1, 2, 3, 



GRADUATE school 41 

L'7. -!•/. and ( 'nurse 5 of the Department of Anatomy. Stu- 
dents desiring to give their chief attention to general 
philosophy may substitute Course 6a or 6b for Anatomy 5. 

A Philosophy Club composed of instructors and stu- 
dents of the Department meets fortnightly. The object 
of the club is to afford free discussion of topics of philo- 
sophical interest which do not find a place in class-room 
work. All students who are credited with more than 
twenty hours' work in the Department, as well as all 
students who have chosen Philosophy as their major sub- 
ject, are eligible to membership in the club. 

The psychological laboratory occupies four large and 
twelve small rooms, of special construction, in Science 
Hall. Among those designed for special uses are a large 
dark-room for experiments on vision, equipped with large 
iris-diaphragm, arc-light, and heliostat attachments; a 
sound-proof room for the study of minimal auditory sen- 
sations ; three small double rooms providing convenient 
isolation of subjects during experiments on reaction-time, 
circulation, etc. The laboratory is supplied throughout 
with water, gas. and electric light and power, and has ap- 
paratus for both practice and research courses. Besides 
the usual outfit for the study of sensation and perception, 
such as is required by Sanford's 'Manual', the laboratory 
is equipped with the following generally useful or special 
pieces: (1) For reaction-time experiments: the Hipp 
chronoscope, and ten pendulum chronoseopes,* together 
with the necessary electric keys, commutators, drop ma- 
chines, sound keys, etc. ; also two clocks* for giving va- 
rious intervals in experiments by the continuous method. 
(2) For graphic work: the Marey and the Luclwig kymo- 
graphs, a continuous paper kymograph, two simple 



♦Designed and made in the Departiuent 



42 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

spring-kymographs, an electric fork, the Kreonecker in- 
terrupter, the Jacques interval watch, together with the 
necessary receiving, transmitting, and writing apparatus: 
the iVIosso plethysmograph, a pneumograph, the Verdin 
radial and carotid sphygmographs, the Runne sphygmo- 
graph, and a constant electric motor. (3) For the study 
of movement: myographs, a tapping machine,* and a 
general ergograph.* (4) For memory and association : a 
compound interrupter,* with drum and escapement, for 
experiments according to the Ebbinghaus method, to- 
gether with the necessary syllable series, etc., and a large 
set of interference cards. (5) Miscellaneous : apparatus 
for testing the competitive instinct ;* instrument for test- 
ing the force and direction of movement simultaneously.* 
(6) An aviary, an incubator and brooder, quarters for 
small animals, artificial nests for ants, etc., and other fa- 
cilities for the study of comparative psychology. 

The workshop of the psychological laboratory is 
equipped with two photographic dark-rooms, an electric 
motor, a Reed lathe with screw-cutting and gear-cutting 
attachments, and the necessary tools for work in wood 
and metal: it is used both for repairing old and for con- 
structing new apparatus. 

In addition to the apparatus in experimental psychol- 
ogy, the Department possesses a laboratory for the study 
of neurology. This includes a large number of charts, a 
series of models of the nervous system, including Auzoux 
models of brain, eye, and ear: Ziegler models of the em- 
bryology of the human brain; a series of human and ani- 
mal brains ; dissecting outfits ; microtomes, microscopes, 
and other appliances necessary to 11m study of ihc struc- 
ture and functions of the nervous system, 

*l)<'H\£Ucd jiimI l r i : i < 1 < ■ in Mm: | )cj);i|t iiicnt . 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 43 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Elementary Psychology. 6 hours. 

la. Introduction to Psychology. 3 hours. 

4a. Experimental Psychology. hours. 

9. Psychology of Religion. 3 hours. 

16. Abnormal Psychology. G hours. 

3. Ethics : Lectures. 4 hours. 

2. Logic. 3 hours. 

27. Introduction to Philosophy. 2 hours. 

Ga. History of Philosophy : Ancient and Mediaeval. 9 hours. 

06. History of Philosophy : Modern. 9 hours. 

25. Advanced Ethics. 4 hours. 

FOR GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

."!."». Modern Idealism. An advanced study of metaphysics, based 
upon Royce's 'The World and the Individual' as a text. Pro- 
fessor Fite. 

Fall. 'Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10 :00. 

Open to students who have taken Courses 1, 2, and 3, or their 
equivalent. 

30. Seminary in Philosophy. A course designed to aid advanced 
students in the investigation of philosophical problems. The 
subject for 1908-09 will be problems of contemporary phi- 
losophy. Professor Lindley. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

Open to students who have had sufficient preparation. 

COURSE FOR GRADUATES 

8. Psychological Research. Work arranged with individual stu- 
dents. Professor Lindley. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 



44 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

*Johjnt A. Bekgstrom, Professor of Education and Director of the 
Psychological Laboratory. 

Ernest O. Holland, Professor of Education. 

W. H. Sanders (Superintendent of the Bloomington Schools), Di- 
rector of Practice in School Supervision and School Administra- 
tion. 

A major for the A.B. degree in Education requires 
forty-five credit hours. 

Special programs of work for the M.A. and Ph.D. de- 
grees will be recommended on application. In general 
the work of one student will differ somewhat from that 
of another, according to the practical career in view. 

Brief descriptions of the Library, Laboratory, Museum, 
and other facilities for the study of Education and the 
professional training of teachers are published in a special 
bulletin, which is obtainable from the Registrar. This 
bulletin also contains a list of collateral courses in Bi- 
ology, Psychology, Sociology, Philosophy, and History 
most likely to be of service to the graduate student in Ed- 
ucation. 

The work of the Department has also been adapted to 
meet the demand for professional, or pedagogical, train- 
ing on the part of all classes of teachers established by 
recent school laws. The courses for this purpose are 
available for graduate students under the general regula- 
tions of the Graduate School. The Teacher's Certificate, 
usually given in conned ion with the A.B. degree to those 
who have completed the requisite academic and pedagogic 
training, may also be given on the same terms to such 
graduate students as may wish to secure it. The Depart- 

*Resigned 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 45 

i in- 1 1 1 offers practice training in high school teaching, 
school supervision, and school administration. 

For several years the best work of students in courses 
4 and 5 has been published under the head of "Contribu- 
tions from the Pedagogical Seminary of Indiana Uni- 
versity." During the present year papers of this series 
have appeared in Education, Boston; the Educator Jour- 
nal. Indianapolis; the Elementary School Teacher, Chi- 
eago; and in the Teacher's Journal, Marion. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Elementary Pedagogy. 15 hours. 

10 a, b, c, d, e, f, The teaching of different subjects in elementary 
schools. Introductory course. (Summer School.) 15 hours 4 

17 a, b, c, d, e, f, The teaching of different subjects in elementary 
schools. Advanced course. (Summer School). 20 to 30 
hours. 

G. High School Pedagogy. hours. 

12. Educational Psychology. 5 hours. 

13. Teaching of Special Subjects. Given by the different liberal 

arts departments. A dozen or more courses. Generally 2 
hours each. 

10. Observation of High School Teaching. 3 hours. 

11. Practice Teaching in the High School. In five different depart- 

ments. 5 hours each. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

[2. History of Education. The study of some of the chief educa- 
tional classics and original sources, together with a connected 
survey of the chief conditions of education from ancient to 
modern times. (1) Fall term: Education in Greece, Rome, 
Alexandria, and the East (especially among the Hebrews). 
(2) Winter term: The early Christian schools, the reforms 
of Charlemagne, the rise of universities, the renaissance. 



46 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

(o) Spring term : The work of the great modern reformers 
of education. Lectures and recitations. Professor Berg- 
strom. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. M. W. F. f at 8:00. 

Monroe, 'Source Book of the History of Education' ; selected 

educational classics.] 
Omitted in 1908-00. Given every third year. 

Lo. Modern School Systems. A comparative study of present day 
education, more especially in the United States, England, 
Germany, France, and Scandinavia ; Education in Indiana. 
The policy of organization, ideals of work, methods of in- 
struction, training of teachers, courses of study, statistics, 
and recent reforms. Lectures and recitations. Professor 
Bergstrom. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 8:00.] 

Omitted in 1908-09. Given every third year. 

7. School Hygiene. School hygienic standards, and their applica- 

tion to school architecture, ventilation, heating, lighting, and 
sanitation. Hygiene of instruction, including the considera- 
tion of habits of study and teaching, and hygienic aspects of 
various subjects and of the curriculum as a whole. Demon- 
stration of methods and instruments used in practical tests 
and in research. A preliminary treatment of parts of the 
subject has been given in the required course in Hygiene and 
in Education G ; it may be continued beyond Course 7 by in- 
vestigation in Courses 4 and 5. Professor Bergstrom. 
Fall term, M. W. F., at 8 :00. 

8. History and Science of Methods. Historical survey of the arts 

of teaching and study. History of theories of mental activity 
and development, and the corresponding theories of general 
method. Dependence of methods upon progress in culture, 
especially upon advances in different subjects. Present day 
methods and their modification through evolutionary peda- 
gogy. A preliminary treatment of parts of the subject has 
been given in several preceding courses; it may be continued 
beyond Course 8 by investigations in Courses I and 5. Pro- 
fessor Bergstrom. 

Winter lerm, M. W. F., a! 8:00. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 4< 

i). Courses <>r Study. Involution of courses of study; comparison 
of courses in different countries, especially in elementary and 
secondary schools; theories as to the selection, gradation, and 

correlation of subjects; text-books: adaptation to various 
social conditions and to differences in the abilities of pupils; 
gradation, promotion, election; department teaching and spe- 
cial schools. A preliminary treatment of parts of the sub- 
ject has been given in several preceding courses ; it may be 
continued beyond Course 9 by investigations in Courses 4 and 
5. Professor Bergstrom. 
Spring term, M. W. P., at 8:00. 

14. Supervision Practice. Practice chiefly in the schools of Bloom- 

iugton in the various duties of supervision, especially criti- 
cism of courses, teaching, tests, promotions, and hygienic 
conditions. Supt. W. H. Sanders. 

Winter term, twice a week, at an hour to be appointed. 

Open to students who have taken at least a minor in Education. 

15. Administration Practice. Care and construction of buildings, 

appointment of teachers, management of school funds, duties 
of school boards and school officers, school law. Supt. W. H. 
Sanders. 

Spring term, twice a week, at an hour to be appointed. 

Open to students who have taken at least a minor in Education. 

4. Pedagogical Seminary. Members meet once a week for the dis- 

cussion of a general topic announced at the beginning of each 
term. For 1907-08 the topic was evolutionary pedagogy. In 
addition, lectures are prepared upon certain aspects of the 
topic. Credit of from two to five hours. Professor 
Bergstrom. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, Th., at 1 :00. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

5. Research in the Psychological Laboratory, the Library, or the 

Schools. In the laboratory several investigations will be in 
progress in which students may serve an apprenticeship ; 
problems may then be taken up independently. The amount 
of work and the time and place for doing it will be arranged 
on consultation. Professor Bergstrom. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 



48 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

Alfred M. Brooks, Professor. 
Robert E. Burke, Instructor. 

There is a good equipment for graduate work in this 
Department. It is in the form of photographs and or- 
iginal engravings, together with the books in the Library. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Principles of Delineation, Color, and Chiaroscuro, and the His- 

tory of Painting. G hours. 

2. History of Ancient Architecture. 5 hours. 

3. History of Mediaeval Architecture. 5 hours. 

4. The Fine Arts of the Renaissance. 3 hours. 

5. History of Architecture. 2 hours. 
G. Engraving and Etching. 2 hours. 

7. Dante. Lectures on 'The New Life' and 'The Divine Comedy'. 

6 hours. 

8. Italian Painting. 

0. Mediaeval Art. 2 hours. 

10. Landscape Painting. 

11. Elementary Mechanical Drawing. G hours. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., 10 :00 to 11 :50. 

12. Freehand Drawing. Figure Sketching. 3 hours. 
L3. Freehand Drawing: Perspective. 3 hours. 

14. Composition and Designing. 3 hours. 
If). Water-Color. (5 hours. 



(;i;aih Aii-: school 49 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Robert .!. Aley, Professor. 
S< iiiYi.ER C. DavissOjS", Professor. 
David A. Rotiirock, Professor. 
I'lvsses S. Hanna, Assistant Professor. 
Charles ITaseman, Assistant Professor. 

Undergraduates taking the work of this Department 
as major subject are required to complete Courses 2, 3, 6, 
7, 11, 10, 13, 21, in the order named. They may elect as 
part of their collateral work Courses 17 and 36. 

The graduate courses at present offered in the Depart- 
ment require about three years for their completion. 

The Library of the Department of Mathematics, con- 
sisting of about 1,900 bound volumes, is located in Room 
36, Wylie Hall. The Library is open from 8:00 a.m. to 
10 :00 p.m. for use by students pursuing advanced work in 
mathematics. The collection of mathematical books con- 
sists of the more important English, French, and German 
texts, the collected works of Abel, Bernoulli, Cauchy, Cay- 
ley, Clifford, DeMorgan, Gauss, Jacobi, Lagrange, Lie, 
Mobius, Riemann, Schwartz, Smith, Steiner, and Weier- 
strass, together with the following sets of periodicals : 

Acta Mathematica. Stockholm, Berlin, Paris. 1882 to date. 

American Journal of Mathematics. Baltimore. 1878 to elate. 

American Mathematical Monthly. Springfield, Mo. 1894 to date. 

Analyst (The). Des Moines, la. 1874-1883. Complete. 

Annals of Mathematics. Charlottesville, Va., and Cambridge, 
Mass. 1884 to date. 

Archiv fiir Mathematik und Physik. Leipzig. 1841 to date. 

Bulletin de la SoeiSte Mnthematique de France. Paris. 1873 
to date. 

Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society. New York. 
1894 to date. 



50 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Bulletin of the New York Mathematical Society. New York. 
1891-1894. Complete. 

Cambridge Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 18:J7-1845. 
Complete. 

Cambridge and Dublin Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 1840- 
18.14. Complete. 

Educational Times (Mathematical Reprints from the). London. 
1803 to date. 

Jahresbericht der deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung. Leip- 
zig. 1890 to date. 

Jahrbuch iiber die Fortschritte der Mathematik. Berlin. 1808 
to date. 

Journal de Mathematiques pures et appliques (Lionville). Paris. 
1830 to date. 

Journal fur die reine und angewandte Mathematik (Crelle). Ber- 
lin. 1820 to date. 

Mathematical Monthly (The). Cambridge, Mass. 1859-1801. 
Complete. 

Mathematical Magazine. Washington. 1882-1884. 

Mathematical Gazette. London. 1901 to date. 

Mathematical Messenger (The). 1887-1894. Complete. 

Mathematical Review. Worcester. 189G-1897. Complete. 

Mathematical Visitor. 1877-1883. Complete. 

Mathematische Annalen. Leipzig. 1809 to date. 

Mathesis. Ghent. 1881 to date. 

Messenger of Mathematics (The Oxford, Cambridge and Dublin). 
Cambridge. 1802-1871. Complete. 

Messenger of Mathematics (The). London and Cambridge. 1872 
to date. 

Nachrichten von der Koniglische Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften 
v.xx Gottingen. Gottingen. 1899 to date. 

Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society. Edinburgh. 
1883 to date. 

Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society. London. 1805 
to date. 

Quarterly Journal of Mathematics, Pure and Applied. Lon- 
don. L857 to date. 

tlendiconti de] Oircolo Matematico di Palermo. Palermo, INS l 
to date, 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 51 

Revue Semestrielle lies Publications Mathematiques. Amsterdam. 
is'.»:; to date. 

Transactions of the American Mathematical Soeiety. New York. 
1900 to date. 

The Euclidian Circle is an organization made up of 
members of the mathematical faculty, graduate students, 
Seniors. Juniors, and Sophomores. Meetings are held on 
the second and fourth Mondays of each month at 7:00 
p.m. The programs consist of essays, reports, and discus- 
sions by the members. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

2. Algebra. 5 hours. 

3. Trigonometry. 5 hours. 

G. Analytical Geometry. 5 hours. 

7. Elementary Calculus. 9 hours. 

11. Solid Analytical Geometry. 2 hours. 

10. Advanced Calculus. 9 hours. 

13. Differential Equations. G hours. 

21. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable. 6 hours. 

7. Surveying. 2 hours. 

3G. Descriptive Geometry. 9 hours. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

The following courses for graduate students will be 
given at hours to be arranged: 

20. Mathematical Reading and Research. Professors Aley, Davis- 
son, and Rotiirock. 

34. Higher Algebra. A course in modern advanced methods of 
algebraic analysis. Four hours' credit. Professor Aley. 



52 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

47. Quaternions. An introductory course with applications to 
geometry and mechanics. Three hours' credit. Professor 

ItOTHBOCK. 

23. Algebra of Qualities. A study of quantics with especial refer- 
ence to invariants, covariants and canonical forms. Four 
hours' credit. Professor Aley. 

32. Theory of Numbers. In this course the elementary properties 

of numbers are studied. Emphasis is given to the general 
theory of congruences. Four hours' credit. Professor Aley. 

22. Modern Pure Geometry. A course of lectures, assigned read- 
ings and selected exercises upon the geometry of the triangle 
and circle. Three hours' credit. Professor Aley. 

15. Modern Analytical Geometry. A study of point and line co- 
ordinates, duality, anharmonic ratios, nature of co-ordinate 
systems, circular points, and the line at infinity. Lectures, 
assigned reading, and exercises. Four hours' credit. Pro- 
fessor DAVISSON. 

30. Theory of Surfaces. Lectures and reports upon the general 
theory of surfaces and twisted curves. Singularities of sur- 
faces, asymptotic curves, lines of curvature, geodesic lines. 
Differential geometry. Four hours' credit. Professor Davis- 
soint. 

II. Non-Euclidean Geometry. Lectures and assigned reading. 
Four hours' credit. Professor Davisson. 

38. Fourier's Series and Fourier's Integrals. A study of the more 
important partial differential equations of mathematical 
physics, the development of functions into sine and cosine 
series Fourier's series and Fourier's integrals, and appli- 
cations of the latter two in the solution of problems in 
physics. Throe hours' credit. Professor Davisson. 

33, Partial Differential Equations. A course based on Weber's 

'Pari idle Differential-Gleichungen'. Six hours. Professor 

ROTHROCK. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 53 

45. Calculus of Variations. Six hours' credit. Professor Roth- 
ROCK. 

I 'J. Bessel, Laplace, and Lame Functions. A study of functions 
defined by differential equations. Applications. Four hours' 
credit. Professor Rothrock. 

1«"». Potential Functions. Four hours' credit. Dr. Haseman. 

48. Mathematical Theory of Elasticity. This course is based on 
Love's 'Treatise on the Theory of Elasticity'. Six hours' 
credit. Dr. Haseman. 

24. Elliptic Integrals and Elliptic Functions. Discussion of ellip- 

tic integrals of the three kinds ; addition theorems, Jacobi's 
geometrical proof of addition theorem ; Landen's transfor- 
mation ; application. Four hours' credit. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Hanna. 

25. Infinite Series and Products. Expansion of functions into 

infinite series and products ; limitations of series ; determina- 
tion of the convergence or divergence of given series. Four 
hours' credit. Assistant Professor Hanna. 

14. History of Mathematics. A detailed study of the history and 
development of mathematics by means of lectures, assigned 
readings, and reports. Six hours' credit. Professor Aley. 



DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICS AND ASTRONOMY 

Wilbur A. Cogshall, Associate Professor of Astronomy. 
Vernon A. Suydam, Instructor in Mechanics. 

Candidates for the degree A.B. in Mechanics and As- 
i ronomy are required to take three full years of daily work 
in this Department (45 hours), and the work of one full 
year in the Department of Physics. In addition the stu- 
dents are recommended to take Mathematics 7, 10, and 11; 
Geology 1 and la; and enough French and German to 
acquire a reading knowledge of these languages. 



54 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Kirkwood Observatory, completed in 1900, is occupied 
by the Department. The building contains a library and 
computing room; a lecture room; dark room; a transit 
room, in which is a Bamberg universal instrument, a How- 
ard sideral clock, a mean time chronometer, and a chrono- 
graph; a dome twenty-six feet in diameter; and a room 
of the same size immediately below. In the dome is the 
refracting telescope, of which the 12-inch objective is by 
Brashear, and the mounting by Warner and Swasey, of 
Cleveland. The instrument has a focal length of about 15 
feet, and is supplied with eyepieces magnifying from 130 
to nearly 1,000 diameters ; also with polarizing helioscope, 
diagonal eyepiece, and an electrically illuminated micro- 
meter; there are both coarse and fine circles in right as- 
cension and declination, the fine circles having reading 
microscope and electrical illumination. 

The Department has in a separate building, a mount- 
ing, designed and built by the Department, that carries 
a 4-inch Browning refractor, a 5-inch portrait lens and an 
8-inch parabolic mirror, for the photography of comets, 
nebulae, etc. 

Another building contains a coelostat and horizontal 
telescope. The objective of the telescope has a diameter 
of 9 inches and a focal length of 64 feet. Both the plane 
of the crelostat and the lens are by Petitdidier, of Chicago. 

The Lawrence Fellowship of the Department of Me- 
chanics and Astronomy of Indiana University has been 
established by Mr. Percival Lowell, of the Lowell Observa- 
tory, upon the following terms and conditions: 

1. The Fellowship shall he known as the Lawrence Fellowship, 
in remembrance of the donor's mother, and is established in per 
petuity, revocable, however, at any lime at the will of the founder. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 55 

2. It shall be annually available and shall cover the college cal- 
endar year, that is from commencement to commencement of the same. 

3. The applicant shall be appointed by the Department, the 
donor reserving the right of final passing upon the suitability of the 
candidate so presented. 

4. (A) The Fellow shall be given time and opportunity for an 
original thesis on some astronomical subject looking to the taking of 
a Master's degree, the nature of which shall be decided by the 
Director and the Fellow. (B) But the Fellow shall be expected to 
give general assistance in the observatory's work during the period of 
his Fellowship. 

5. The Fellowship shall pay $600 and the Fellow's traveling ex- 
penses to and from the Observatory at Flagstaff, Ariz. ; and a fur- 
nished room at the Observatory shall be free to the Fellow's use. 

The Department receives telegraphic bulletins of dis- 
coveries made at American and European observatories. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Descriptive Astronomy. G hours. 

2. Practical Astronomy. 5 hours. 

3. Current Astronomy. 6 hours. 

4. Observatory Practice. 6 hours. 

5. Celestial Photography. 2 hours. 
('). Elementary Mechanics. 5 hours. 
7. Analytical Mechanics. 9 hours. 

10. Hydraulics. 3 hours. 
'.). Graphic Statics. G hours. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

12. Theoretical Astronomy. Integration of equations of motion ; 
computation of orbits and ephemerides. Associate Professor 
Cog sit all. 
Fall term. Hours and credit to be arranged with each student. 
Open to students who have passed in Mathematics 7. 



56 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

13. Research. A limited number of students will be permitted to 

undertake research work under the supervision of the De- 
partment. The equipment is best suited for work in astron- 
omy of precision and celestial photography. Associate Pro- 
fessor Cogshall. 
Fall, Winter and Spring terms. Hours and credit arranged 
with each student. 

14. Orbits of Spectroscopic Binaries. A discussion of the methods 

of Rambault, Lehmann-Filhes, and others for the determina- 
tion of these orbits. Associate Professor Cogshall. 
Winter term, T. Th., at 2:00. 

15. Celestial Mechanics. An introductory course. Associate Pro- 

fessor Cogshall. 
Spring term, M. W. F., at 11:00. 
Open to students who have passed in Course 7. 

8. Theoretical Mechanics. Lectures and recitation from text-book. 

Geometry of motion ; linear, plane and solid kinematics ; 

kinetics of a particle and of free and rigid bodies ; motion of 

a variable system. Mr. Sitydam. 
Fall and Winter terms, M. W. F., at 9 :00. 
Zeiwet, 'Theoretical Mechanics'. 

8a. Rigid Dynamics. A course intended for students who have 
completed Mechanics 7 and 8. Discussion of laws of motion, 
work and energy, oscillations and cyclic motions, dynamics 
of rigid and deformable bodies, hydrodynamics. Mr. Suydam. 

Kail term, T. Th., at hours to be arranged. 

Webster, 'The Dynamics of Particles and of Rigid, Elastic and 
Fluid Bodies'. 

Open to Seniors and graduates who have passed in Mathematics 
11, 10, and 13. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL Oi 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

AitTUUR L. Foley, Professor oL' Physics. 

Rolla It. Ramsey, Associate Professor of Physics. 

Undergraduates electing Physics as their major sub- 
ject are required to complete Courses 1 and 2, and either 
6. 19. 11, 20 and 5, or 17, 23, 27, 29, 11 and 20. Substitu- 
tions will not, as a rule, be permitted, although the order 
of the courses may be changed and a greater number of 
courses may be taken simultaneously, thus shortening the 
time required to complete the work. Courses 6 and 7 in 
Mathematics should be taken as early as possible. 

The Department offers a full course leading to the de- 
gree of Ph.D. 

A Physics Club, consisting of the instructors and of 
advanced students of the Department, meets on alternate 
Thursdays at 7 :00 p.m. At each meeting one or two re- 
ports are presented upon the more important recent scien- 
tific investigations, and upon subjects in physics that are 
not considered in the class-room. 

The Department is located in Science Hall. The lower 
half of this building was planned to meet the special needs 
of the Department, and it embodies the most advanced 
ideas in physical laboratory construction. The location of 
the building insures freedom from vibration; the con- 
struction is massive and thoroughly fireproof. On the 
basement floor there are a constant temperature room, a 
large dynamo laboratory, a manual training laboratory, a 
drawing room, two research laboratories and two store- 
rooms. The first floor is occupied by the office of the De- 
partment, the departmental library, a shop room, an ap- 
paratus room, an advanced electrical laboratory, two pho- 
tometric laboratories, a spectroscopic and photographic 
laboratory, a standardizing laboratory, a chemical and 



58 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

battery room, a laboratory for advanced work in heat, two 
research laboratories, five developing rooms, and the ele- 
mentary laboratories. The latter comprise five rooms — a 
large room devoted to general practice, and fonr small 
rooms for work in sound and light. The south wing of 
the second floor contains the lecture room, an apparatus 
and preparation room, and a class room. The lecture 
room has an elevated floor and is seated with tablet-arm 
opera chairs. It is provided with automatic blinds, 
screens, and boards, all under the immediate control of 
the lecturer. The lecture table is built in three sections, 
and the plumbing and wiring are arranged so that one, 
two, or three sections may be used at a time. At the table 
the lecturer has battery and dynamo currents (direct and 
alternating, — one, two, and three phase), dial rheostats, 
voltmeters, ammeters, electric motors, calcium and elec- 
tric lanterns, projectoscope, low and high resistance pro- 
jecting galvanometers, water, gas, compressed air, exhaust 
cocks, etc. All the laboratories are supplied with water, 
gas, and electricity. The basement floors are of concrete. 
There are fifteen large masonry piers and more than three 
hundred lineal feet of six-inch stone wall shelves. The 
chemical and battery room has a fume hood and a cement 
floor. All the developing rooms have both gas and elec- 
tric ruby lights, tile shelves, and lockers. Thirteen rooms 
are provided with blinds for making them light tight. 
The smaller shop room contains a cabinet-maker's bench, 
a wood trimmer, two screw-cutting lathes, a shaper, a 
grinder, and wood and metal working tools. This shop 
is for the repair and construction of physical apparatus. 
The larger shop is equipped with cabinet-maker's benches, 
power saws, grinders, wood and metal working lathes, 
forges, and the tools required for the shop work outlined 



UHADUATE SCHOOL 59 

under Courses 17, L'7, 28, and 29. The dynamo room in 
Science Hall is equipped with generators and motors of 
eight differenl types, selected to illustrate the essential 
features of early as well as modern practice. The gener- 
ators are belted to a line shaft driven by a Lincoln va- 
riable speed motor with speed range of one to five. A 
traveling crane permits the lifting of any machine in posi- 
tion to be connected by a torsion dynamometer to any 
other machine, and the machines studied both as gener- 
ators and motors. AH the machines are of special con- 
struction, the field and armature windings being divided 
into sections and the terminals brought to separate posts, 
thus permitting the study of the performance of the ma- 
chines under widely different conditions. Direct current 
may be had of any voltage up to eight hundred, and alter- 
nating current (one, two, or three phase), of any fre- 
quency from ten to three hundred, and of any voltage 
(without transformers) up to six hundred. The volt- 
age range is still further increased by transformers of 
various sizes having both primary and secondary coils in 
three sections with separate terminals for each section. A 
large dynamo laboratory is provided in a separate build- 
in g. It is equipped with three single engines, one of ten, 
one of forty, and one of one hundred fifty horsepower, one 
compound engine of one hundred twenty-five horsepower, 
and four generators, respectively of twenty, twenty, 
eighty, and one hundred kilowatts capacity. The labora- 
tory is well equipped with voltmeters, ammeters, watt- 
meters, dynamometers, rheostats, and other instruments 
for heavy currents; also with delicate instruments for 
exad measurements. 

The supply of apparatus for the presentation of 
courses in modern experimental physics is fairly com- 



GO INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

plete. The equipment and facilities for work have been 
largely increased during the past three years, especially in 
the way of delicate instruments and accurate standards 
for advanced study. 

The Library of the Department of Physics contains 
about six hundred volumes, exclusive of sets of several 
journals. The following magazines are on file : ' Annalen 
der Physik', 'Annales cle Chemie et de Physique', 'Bei- 
blatter zn den Annalen der Physik', 'Physikalische Zeit- 
schrift', 'The Electrical World and Engineer', 'The Elec- 
trician' (London), 'Journal de Physique', 'The Philosoph- 
ical Magazine', 'The Physical Review', 'The Proceedings 
of the Physical Society of London', 'The Proceedings of 
the Royal Society', 'Le Radium', 'School Science and 
Mathematics', 'Science Abstracts' (A and B), 'Scientific 
American and Supplement', 'The Western Electrician', 
'Cassier's Magazine', and 'The Manual Training Maga- 
zine'. Students have access also to the journals on file 
in the general library, and in the libraries of other De- 
partments. Of these may be named: 'The American 
Journal of Science', 'The Astrophysical Journal', 'The 
Engineering and Mining Journal', 'The Engineering 
.Magazine', 'Nature', 'Comptes Rendns', and 'Science'. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. General Physics. i> hours. 

2. Laboratory Practice. 6 hours. 

'A. Advanced Laboratory Work. 6 hours. 

\«. Ileal Lectures. •"> hours. 

\h. Ileal. Advanced Laboratory Work. '2 hours. 

6a. Light. Lectures. .". hours. 

c//. Light. Advanced Laboratory Work. '2 hours. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 61 

i:i. Physical Problems. 
11. Practical Photography. 

•jo. Physical Methods and the Manipulation of Physical Apparatus. 
1 hour. 

5a. Theoretical and Experimental Electricity. G hours. 

.")//. Electricity. hours. 
10a. Applied Electricity and Dynamo-Electric Machinery. 9 hours. 
L06. Applied Electricity and Dynamo-Electric Machinery. 9 hours. 
2.">. Mechanical Drawing and Designing. G hours. 

24. Polyphase Electric Currents. 3 hours. 
2(5. Engineering Laboratory Practice. 1 hour. 

25. Thermodynamics. 2 hours. 
17. Shop Work. G hours. 

27. Wood Working, Turning, and Pattern Making. 4 hours. 
29. Machine Shop Work. 9 hours. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

12. Theory of Light. Lectures and recitations. Associate Pro- 
fessor Ramsey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 9 :00. 
Preston, 'Theory of Light.' 

1G&. Laboratory Practice in Spectroscopy and Photometry. Pro- 
fessor Foley and Associate Professor Ramsey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 2 :00. 

14. Advanced Laboratory Methods and Research. Professor 
Foley. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, at 1 :00. 

22. Current Physical Literature. Professor Foley. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 11:00. 

.30. Advanced Theoretical Physics. A critical study of standard 
treatises and memoirs. Professor Foley. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 



62 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

Edgar LI. Cumings, Associate Professor. 
Joshua W. Beede, Assistant Professor. 

[An act of the State Legislature, in force since September 7, 
18G1, provides that "The State Geologist, while he holds his office, 
shall be regarded as a member of the Faculty of the University, and 
he is hereby directed in his reconnoissances to collect duplicate speci- 
mens of mineralogy and geology, and to deposit one set of the same 
in the cabinet of the State University". The present incumbent of the 
office is Hon. Willis Stanley Blatciiley, A.B., Indiana Univer- 
sity, 1887; A.M., 1891. J 

Candidates for graduation in this Department are re- 
quired to do three full years of daily work in Geology, 
and in addition Zoology 1, Astronomy 1, and Chemistry 1. 
A certain portion of the work in Geology must represent 
investigation of some problem in the field. An opportu- 
nity is given the student to carry on such work during 
the summer vacation. 

The Department also offers courses leading to the Ph.D. 
degree. The Department is provided with the following 
laboratories: (1) A geological laboratory and lecture 
room, used for general geology, and geography; (2) a 
mineralogical laboratory, which will accommodate twenty 
students; (3) an elementary paleontological laboratory, 
which will accommodate about six students; (4) two re- 
search laboratories; (5) a large museum room devoted 
to the study and installation of collections. 

In (he course in Mineralogy each student is provided 
with ali the necessary apparatus for the determination of 
the common ores and rock-making minerals. The collec- 
tions used in the course in elementary Mineralogy include 
aboul two hundred and twenty-five species. The erystal- 
lographie collections contain aboul two hundred and fifty 



GRADUATE SCHOOL Ch\ 

wooden and plaster models, Howell's celluloid models, and 
a carefully selected collection of minerals illustrating 
characteristic crystal forms. 

The facilities for geographical study have been much 
enlarged by the addition to the laboratory equipment of 
a Large series of maps, charts, lantern slides, models, etc. 
The map collections furnish part of the necessary material 
for advanced geographical courses. 

The Department is in possession of an extensive collec- 
tion of fossils, including' a type collection of invertebrates 
arranged in biological sequence, and a historical collec- 
tion representing the characteristic life forms of the sev- 
eral geological epochs, as well as very large collections 
representing the Indiana formations. The latter include 
much unworked material, especially rich in the young 
stages of Brachiopoda and Bryozoa, which could serve as 
the basis of investigations in paleontological lines. The 
Department also possesses about 3,000 thin sections of 
fossils, mostly Bryozoa; and has all the facilities — rock 
sheer, grinding plates, etc. — for making sections. 

The work of the Department for the Summer term 
consists in a detailed study of the field relations of some 
one of the geological formations of Indiana. For the pres- 
ent the Ordovician or Mississippian will be made the ob- 
ject of investigation. This work involves the determina- 
tion of the areal, topographical and stratigraphical rela- 
tions of the formation and its subdivisions, together with 
the collection of fossils and the accurate delimitation of 
faunal zones. Students electing this work must have 
completed Courses 1, la. and 4. Credit will be given for 
the work in proportion to the actual time spent in the 
held. 

Work of this sort, but more advanced in character, 



64 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

may also be pursued by students who are candidates for 
an advanced degree. The State of Indiana affords many 
geological and geographical problems suited to form the 
basis for a thesis for the doctor's degree. 

The Department receives the following periodicals : 
' Geological Magazine', 'Quarterly Journal of the Geo- 
logical Society of London', 'Zeitschrift der deutschen 
geologischen Gesellschaf t ', 'Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie, 
Mineralogie und Paleontologie', 'Geologiches Central- 
blatt', 'Geographisches Zeitschrift', 'Bulletin de la So- 
ciete Geologique de France', 'Annales de Geographie', 
'Annales de Paleontologie', 'Engineering and Mining 
Journal', 'School of Mines Quarterly', 'Journal of Geol- 
ogy', 'Economic Geology', 'Transactions of the St. Louis 
Academy of Science', 'Journal of the Cincinnati Society 
of Natural History', 'Bulletins of the Geological Society 
of America', 'Bulletin of the Geological Department of 
the University of California', 'Monthly Weather Review.' 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1, la and 4. General Oeology (Dynamical, Structural, and His- 

torical). 15 hours. 

2. Mineralogy. 5 hours. 

('). Physical Geography. 10 hours. 

12. Advanced Physical Geography. 5 hours. 

<S. Field Geology. 10 hours. 

'.'>. Economic Geology. 5 hours. 

l.'J. Advanced Field Work. 5 lo 15 hours. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

.">. Economic Geology. Lectures, laboratory and field work on 
the geological relations, geographical distribution, and uses 
of the more common building stones, clays, cements, coals, 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 65 

oil and uas. and ores. Fully illustrated by lantern slides. 

The preparation of reports on assigned topics is required. 

Assistant Professor BEEDE. 
Winter term, daily, at 2 :00. 
This course may also be elected by Seniors in Geology or 

Chemistry. 

5. Systematic Paleontology. The general principles of the subject 
are taught by means of occasional lectures, supplemented by 
a study of the general literature of paleontology. Training 
in the systematic study of fossils is given by means of care- 
ful determination in the laboratory of typical groups of 
Paleozoic invertebrates. Associate Professor Cumings and 
Assistant Professor Beede. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two to five hours, at times to 
be arranged. 

Open to students who have passed in Zoology 1, and Geology 1, 
la, and 4 

5a. Evolution. Study of the principles of organic evolution as 
illustrated by fossil organisms. Associate Professor Cum- 
ings. 

Winter term, at an hour to be arranged. 

Open to graduate students only. 

10. Research. Investigation of geological and paleontological 
problems. The results obtained, when of sufficient merit, 
will be published as 'Contributions from the Geological Lab- 
oratory of Indiana University'. Associate Professor Cum- 
txgs and Assistant Professor P»eede. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 9 :00 to 4 :50. 

13. Advanced Field Work. This work is described in the general 
announcement above. It consists of continuous work in 
the field for a month or more during the Summer vacation. 
It will usually be taken up as part of a research problem by 
candidates for the A.B. degree in geology, or by candidates 
for an advanced degree. 
Open only to advanced students in Geology. 



66 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

14. Stratigraphic Geology: A thorough study of the literature of 
the various geologic systems. The history of their investi- 
gation and the present knowledge of their divisions, distribu- 
tion, faunas and paleogeography will be considered. Asso- 
ciate Professor CUMINGS and Assistant Professor BEEDE. 
Fall, Winter and Spring terms. Lectures Tuesday and Thurs- 
day, at 10:00. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Robert E. Lyons, Professor. 
Louis is. Davis, Professor. 
Oliver W. Brown, Associate Professor. 
Fr.4nk C. Mathers, Assistant Professor. 
"Clarence E. May, Assistant Professor. 

The Department of Chemistry has general, special, and 
private laboratories, a library room, a lecture room, bal- 
ance rooms, an incubator room, a stock room, museum, etc. 
Special laboratories are provided for electrochemistry, 
assaying' and electric furnace work, organic, inorganic 
and physiological chemistry, water and gas analysis, spec- 
troscopic analysis. The laboratories comprise eleven 
large, well-lighted rooms, equipped with workstands, ca- 
pable of accommodating two hundred and seventy-five 
students. Each room is provided with fume hoods and 
aii- registers connected with a ventilating fan for the re- 
moval of offensive and poisonous gases. 

The general equipment for graduate work, including 
laboratory and library facilities, lnis been materially in- 
creased during the past, year. A Laboratory for electro- 
metallurgy has been installed and fully equipped. 

Special attention •?•> given to inorganic, organic, physi- 
ological, physical and electro chemistry, technical analyt- 
ical chemistry, and electrometallurgy. 

*From August 1 , 1008. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 67 

The graduate work of the Department, leading to the 
degrees A.M. and Ph.D., comprises advanced laboratory, 
led inc. library and seminary work in the lines indicated 
above, and special graduate courses described below. A 
thesis embodying original investigation is required for an 
advanced degree. 

Graduate students should have a reading knowledge 
of German and French. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Courses 1 (or la), 3 1 , 3 2 , 4, 5, b\ G' J , 7, 18 1 , 18 2 , and 
30 1 , 30-, 30 s , or the equivalent, are required for admission 
to the graduate courses in Chemistry. 

1 or la, General Chemistry. 5 hours. 
.">. Qualitative Analysis. 10 hours. 

4. Quantitative Analysis (Gravimetric). 5 hours. 

5. Quantitative Analysis (Volumetric). 5 hours. 

6. Organic Chemistry. 10 hours. 

7. Organic Chemistry. 5 hours. 

18. Physical Chemistry. 4 hours. 
30. Advanced Inorganic. 6 hours. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

14. Seminary. Reports on current literature and special topics. 
(.1) Fall term: Inorganic Chemistry. Assistant Professor 
Mathers. (2) Winter term : Organic Chemistry. Profes- 
sor I.YONS. (3) Spring term: Electro- and Industrial 
Chemistry. Associate Professor Brown. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, Th., at 7:00 p.m. 

19. Physical Chemistry. Laboratory work in physico-chemical 

measurements supplementary to the lectures. Includes cali- 
bration of instruments, determination of molecular weights, 



68 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

thermo-chemical measurements, a study of the properties of 
solutions, the speed of chemical reactions, etc Research 

work. Associate Professor Bkown. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to he arranged. 
Ostwald-Luther, 'Physiko-ehemische Messungen'. 

22. Electrochemistry. (A) Lectures on the general theory and 

laws of electrochemistry, and the principles and methods em- 
ployed in the electrodeposition of metals for quantitative an- 
alysis, plating, separating, and refining. (B ) Laboratory 
work in quantitative electrolytic analysis, electrochemical 
measurements and electroplating. Associate Professor 
Brown. 

Winter term. Lectures T. Th., at 8 :00 ; laboratory work, M. 
W. F., 1 :00 to 4 :50. 

Lehfelt, 'Electrochemistry' ; Classen, 'Quantitative Electrolytic 
Analysis' ; Pfanhauser, 'Elektroplattirung'. 

Presupposes Chemistry 1 and 3, and Physics 1 and 2. 

23. Electrochemistry. (A) Lectures. Electrolysis and electro-syn- 

thesis of inorganic and organic compounds, primary and sec- 
ondary batteries, and a study of the various electrochemical 
and electro-metallurgical processes which are of commercial 
importance. (B) Laboratory work in the preparation of in- 
organic and organic compounds by electrolytic and electro- 
thermal methods, and in testing primary and storage bat- 
teries. Associate Professor Brown. 

Spring term. Lectures T. Th., at 8 :00 ; laboratory work, M. 
W. F., 1 :00 to 4 :50. 

Elbs, 'Electrolytic Preparations' ; Borchers, 'Electric Smelting 
and Refining'. 

24. Advanced Electrochemistry and Electro-metallurgy. (A) Ad- 

vanced laboratory work and research in pure and applied 
electrochemistry and electro-metallurgy, including investiga- 
tions in electric furnace work, refining and extraction of 
metals, electro-synthesis of organic and inorganic compounds, 
manufacture ol storage; batteries, and of industrial electro- 
chemical processes. (B) Lectures on the design and opera- 
tion <>f commercial electric furnaces and on electric furnace 
processes and products. Associate Professor Bkown. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 69 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Laboratory work, daily, 8 :00 
to 4 :50 ; Lectures, Winter term, P., at 8 :00. 

Students in this course are recommended to take Physics 10 
and 24. 

26. Chemical Engineering. Machinery, appliances and materials 
of construction in the chemical industries. Laws and prin- 
ciples involved in the operation of chemical processes on an 
industrial scale. Associate Professor Brown. 

Fall term. Lectures, M. W., at 8:00. 

Davis, 'Chemical Engineering'. 

29. Storage Batteries. (A) Lectures and recitations on the 
theory, operation, testing and design of storage batteries. 
(B) Laboratory work in the testing and building of storage 
batteries. Associate Professor Brown. 

Spring term, 1909. Lectures F., at 8 :00 ; laboratory work, one 
or more periods a week. 

Dolezalek, 'Theory of the Lead Accumulator' ; Lyndon, 'Stor- 
age Battery Engineering'. 

For advanced work in the manufacture of storage batteries see 
Chemistry 24. 

13. Elementary Metallurgy and Assaying. The course is given in 
alternate years. (A) Laboratory work. The fire assay of 
gold, silver, and lead ores. (B) Lectures on assaying and 
on elementary metallurgy, including a discussion of typical 
metallurgical processes. Associate Professor Brown. 

Fall term, 1908-09. Lectures, T. Th., , at 8 :00 ; laboratory 
work, F. S., 8:00 to 11:50. 

Brown, 'Manual of Assaying' ; Robert-Austen, 'Introduction to 
the Study of Metallurgy'. 

Presupposes Geology 2 and Chemistry 5. 

12. Advanced Laboratory and Research Work in Organic or Phys- 
iological Chemistry. Following are the problems studied in 
1907-08 : Substituted oxy-acetyl derivatives of urea and thio- 
urea ; thio-carbonyl salicylamide and derivatives ; an investi- 
gation of thirty samples of Indiana peat. Professor Lyons. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

13. Quantitative Analysis. Advanced laboratory practice in tech- 
nical and engineering analysis. The work is selected to meet 
the particular need of the student and as a preparation for 
actual work in commercial laboratories in the following 
lines : Iron ores, pig iron and steel ; clay, limestone, rock 
and cement ; soaps, fertilizers, soils, and foods ; oils, var- 
nishes and paints ; testing of chemical reagents and water 
for industrial use: alloys, ores of copper, zinc, lead, tungs- 
ten, vanadium, manganese. The use of the microscope, spec- 
troscope, and refractometer in the examination of certain 
commercial products, foods, and beverages. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Mathers. 

Spring term, daily, S :00 to 4:50. Students will be received at 
any time during the term. 

Presenilis, 'System of Quantitative Analysis' ; Sutton, 'Volu- 
metric Analysis' ; Stillman, 'Engineering Chemistry' ; Ulzer 
and Fraenkel, 'Techno-Chemical Analysis' ; Classen, 'Quan- 
titative Analysis'; Olsen, 'Quantitative Analysis'; collateral 
reading. 

Presupposes Courses 1, 3, 4, and 5. This course is also open 
to special students. 

Ml. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Laboratory work. The prep- 
aration and study of the properties and reactions of the dif- 
ferent compounds of the rare and uncommon elements, fol- 
lowed by research. This includes a review of the literature 
relating to the (dement that is being studied. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Math Kits. 
Pall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., 8:00 to 4:50. 

.'!:!. Gas and Fuel Analysis. (A) Lectures and recitations. Theory 
of gas and fuel analysis, and a description of the apparatus 
used. Calculation and interpretation of data dealing with 
problems in gas and fuel testing. </>') Laboratory work. 
Use and manipulation of the apparatus used in commercial 
gas analysis. Analysis of mixtures of gases, air. illuminat- 
ing gas, and producer gas. Approximate and ultimate analy- 
sis of coal. Healing evaluation of coke, coal, oil. and peat, 
by Hie Parr calorimeter. Three hour course. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Mathers. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 71 

Full term, lectures T., at 1:00; laboratory work at hours to 

bo arranged. 
Hempel-Denuis, 'Gas Analysis': Gill, 'Gas and Fuel Analysis 

for Engineers'. 

Spectrum Analysis and Sugar Analysis. (A) Lectures and 
Recitations. Theory and description of apparatus used in 
spectrum analysis. Outlines of the characteristic spectra of 
the different elements as used in qualitative anaylsis. De- 
scription of apparatus and the methods used in sugar an- 
alysis. (Ji) Laboratory work. Use of a Kruess spectroscope 
in mapping the emission, spark and absorption spectra of 
certain elements. Qualitative analysis with the spectroscope 
of unknown samples and of certain commercial products and 
minerals. Analysis of sugar by the polariscope and by chem- 
ical means according to the methods used in commercial 
sugar laboratories. Assistant Professor Mathers. 

Winter term, lectures, F., 1:00; laboratory work at hours to 
be arranged. 

Watt's, 'Introduction to the Study of Spectrum Analysis' ; Baly, 
'Spectroscopy' ; Kolfe, 'The Polariscope'. 

Advanced Organic Chemistry. Lectures and Recitations. 

Primarily for graduates. 
Cohen. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 
Fall term. T. and Th.. at 9:00. Professor Lyons. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 

David M. Mottier, Professor. 

Fuamv M. Andrews, Associate Professor. 

James M. Van Hook, Assistant Professor. 

Candidates for the decree of Bachelor of Arts in Bot- 
any are required to pursue a minimum of forty-five hours 
of work or its equivalent in the Department, together 
will) one year's work in some other science. Students 
are urged to learn to read German books and papers on 
Botany. 



72 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

The work immediately following the elementary course 
is largely advanced laboratory work ; it is purely indi- 
vidual, and its methods are the same as in original inves- 
tigation. The supplementary Course 8 may be taken in 
connection with any of the advanced work ; it consists 
largely of lectures, and the subjects treated may vary 
from year to year. The latter part of the course is gen- 
erally devoted to some line of study which may serve as 
an introduction to research. A few of the advanced 
courses are given in alternate years only. 

Graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Arts 
in Botany comprises special studies along some line indi- 
cated in the advanced courses enumerated below, or the 
investigation of some problem of a more limited scope. 
For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the subject of the 
thesis is selected from some line of morphology, cytology, 
or physiology. A reading knowledge of German and 
French is assumed. 

The Department occupies the second floor of Owen 
Hall, together with special laboratories in the basement 
and a small greenhouse. On the second floor are the 
three well-lighted general laboratories, the office and pri- 
vate laboratory, the departmental library, and the general 
storeroom. A dark room for photographic and experi- 
mental work, constant temperature and incubator rooms, 
and a winter storage and work room are in the basement. 
The west laboratory on the second floor is used also for 
Hie Department lecture room. It is provided with a Zeiss 
projection apparatus by which it is possible to project 
upon Hie screen various phenomena of plant life, living 
organisms of tniscroscopic size, miscroscopic preparations 
of tissues and organs, as well as lantern slides and other 
1 ransparencies. 



QB LDUATE SCHOOL 73 

The departmental library contains the more necessary 
works of reference and the principal botanical journals. 

The research work in this Department during the past 
three or four years has been confined to studies in spora- 
genesis and spermatogenesis among higher plants. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

1. Elementary Botany. 15 hours. 

2. Histology. 5 hours. 

!). Embryology of Angiosperms. 5 hours. 
5. Physiology. 10 hours. 

10. Ecology and Taxonomy. 5 hours. 

11. Embryology of Gymnosperms. 5 hours. 

12. Morphology of Bryophytes and Pteridophytes. 5 hours. 

15. Morphology and Classification of the Flowering Plants. 5 hours. 

IT. Study of Trees. 5 hours. 

14. Seminary. The work of the Seminary consists of reports on 
investigations carried out in the laboratory, reviews of cur- 
rent botanical literature, and the study of special works per- 
taining to botanical science. Professor Mottier. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at an hour to be appointed. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

4. Morphology of Fungi. A study of the life-history of represen- 

tatives of the great groups of fungi, supplemented by a sys- 
tematic acquaintance with various genera of the local flora. 
Lectures and laboratory work. Assistant Professor Van 
Hook. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1 :00 to 3 :00. 

<*>. Cytology. Practical application of modern methods in a study 
of nuclear and cell-division. Professor Mottier. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

5. r l he Cell in Sex and Heredity. Lectures on the evolution of 

sex in plants, Ihe process of fecundation, and closely related 
phenomena. 1 lie introductory lectures deal with nuclear and 



74 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

cell-division in the plant kingdom, frequent reference being 
made, tor comparison, to karyokinesis in the animal cell. 
Professor Mottier. 

Fall term, T. Th., at 3:00. 

Given in alternate years. 

13. Morphology of the Algae. A study of the life-history and of 
the development of vegetative and reproductive organs in 
representative algae. The work is confined very largely to 
fresh-water forms. Lectures and laboratory work. Pro- 
fessor MOTTIEE. 
Fall term, daily, 1 :30 to 5 :00. 

7. Original Research. Problems for special investigation will be 
assigned to students who are prepared to undertake original 
work. Professor MOTTIElt. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

Ability to read German and French is assumed. 

18. Investigations in Mycology and Plant Pathology. Assistant 
Professor Van Hook. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1 :00 to 3 :00. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Caul II. Eigenmann, Professor and Director of the Biological 

Station. 
Charles Zeleny, Associate Professor. 

Undergraduates selecting Zoology as their major sub- 
ject are required to complete 45 hours, of which two years 1 
work (Courses 1, 2a, 2b, 2c), are alike for all students. 
The third year, Course 3, is devoted to the investigation 
of some limited topic and the preparation of a report. 
This course differs with cacti student; it is a research 
course. All students making Zoology their major subject 
are recommended to lake Botany 1. Physiology, and Chem- 

isl r\ early in 1 heir course 

Pull work leading to the degree Ph.D. is o\Y(>v<>(\ in 



GRADUATE SCHOOL (0 

Course 6. it is purely a research course and oilers the 
wiiK'st choice of subjects commensurate with the equip- 
ment of the Department. 

The subjects selected have radiated from two centers. 
< me of these is the problem or problems of the fresh water 
fauna of tropical America. At the present the Depart- 
ment is engaged in a study of divergent evolution as 
shown by the tropical American Characin fishes. 

The Department is well equipped for this work. The 
most important of the zoological collections is the collec- 
tion of fishes, comprising many thousand specimens. Ar- 
rangements have been made for cooperation with various 
other institutions by which the largest aggregation of col- 
lections of South American freshwater fishes in the world 
is available for a monograph in preparation. Mr. John 
Haseman, A.M., '07, of this University, is exploring the 
rivers between the La Plata and the San Francisco rivers 
for the Carnegie Museum of Pittsburg; and another ex- 
pedition will try to reach the plateau of Guiana during 
the coming year. Collections have been received during 
the year from Central America, through the Field Museum 
of Chicago; from Brazil, through the British Museum, 
and especially through the Museu Paulista of Sao Paulo, 
Brazil. By special arrangement the collections of Har- 
vard University, made by L. Agassiz and his assistants 
during th< j Thayer expedition, and by others, are avail- 
able for a monograph on the American Characins. The 
first section of this is nearly ready for the printer. 

The second center of departmental interest has been 
and is the subject of heredity, especially: {A) The his- 
tory of the sex cells. (/?) Variation, (C) The rate of onto- 
and phylogenic modification of the sense organs of cave 
animals, D Regeneration. 



ib IXJMAX.V UNIVERSITY 

For the study of (C) cave animals, the facilities of the 
Department are ideal. The University is located at the 
edge of the great cave region. By act of the Legislature 
the Donaldson estate near Mitchell, Indiana, has been 
placed in the keeping of the trustees of Indiana Univers- 
ity. On it are situated numerous sink holes, dry caves 
and an underground water-course at least two miles long. 
This underground river is rich in blind fishes and other 
blind aquatic animals. A small laboratory dwelling has 
been erected on the farm and is in charge of a research 
assistant appointed from year to year. Applications for 
the assistantship should be sent to C. H. Eigenmann. Ap- 
plicants must be able to be self-directive in large measure. 
In the study of cave animals the Department has in the 
past had the cooperation of the Carnegie Institution, the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science. 
and the Elizabeth Thompson Science Fund. 

For the study of (B) variation in non-migratory ver- 
tebrates in a unit of environment this Department organ- 
ized and has since maintained a freshwater Biological 
Station. It is at present located on Winona Lake. Kosci- 
usko County, Indiana, in the grounds of the Winona As 
sembly. The Station owns two buildings, 20x45 feet, each 
two stories high. The buildings are on the lake front, at 
the mouth of Cherry Creek. The Station also owns boats, 
ncls. sounding and temperature apparatus, glassware, etc. 
Microscopes and other needed apparatus are moved to the 
Station from the University. 1 

For the study of (P) regeneration, under the sole di- 
rection of Dr. Zeleny, the Department owns all the neces- 
sary glassware, and a small stream flowing through the 

her information concerning Hie Station will !»<■ found in the announce 
menl of spring and mmmei courses, for which address the Registrar. 



GRADUATE S ( ri»H»L I ( 

campus, and various small poids about Bloomington, offer 
an abundance of material. 

The Departmenl receives many of the leading zoologi- 
cal journals. Advanced students have access, besides, to 
the professor's private library, which is rich in papers 
dealing with variation, heredity, limnology, speleology, 
vertebrate embryology, and fishes. 

OOV RSES 1- OK UNDERGRADUATES 
1. Elementary Zoology. 15 hours. 
2a. Vertebrate Zoology. 5 hours. 
26. Embryology. 5 hours. 
2c. Cellular Biology. ."> hours. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES OR UNDERGRADUATES 

.'!. Advanced Zoology. The work in this course is entirely indi- 
vidual. Each student selects, with the cooperation of the 
professor, some limited subject for special investigation. This 
course will serve for each student as an introduction to his 
special work in the Graduate School. Professor Eigexmaxx 
and Associate Professor Zeleny. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, one to fifteen hours a week. 

Selected monographs. 

4a. General Biological Problems: The development of the idea of 
evolution and Darwinism. Lectures and reports. Professor 
ElGENMAKIf. 
Winter term. M. W. F., at 8:00. 

Ah. General Biological Problems. The laws and theories of hered- 
ity. Lectures and reports. Professor Eigexmaxx. 
Spring term, T. Th., at 8 :00. 

.">. Seminary. Weekly meetings of advanced students and in- 
structors to discuss current literature and report on investi- 
gations in progress. Professor Eigexmanx and Associate 
Professor Zelexy. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 4:00. 



1$ INDIANA UNIVERSITY 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES 



0. Research. Special investigation of zoological problems, with a 
report on each investigation. Branches in which subjects 
have in the past been selected and reported upon are Varia- 
tion, Degeneration, Regeneration, Sense Organs, Embryology 
of Fishes, Faunal and Systematic Studies of Fishes, Ecology 
of Cave and Freshwater Animals. For a fuller statement, 
see the general account of the Department. Professor Eigen- 
mann and Associate Professor Zeleny. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8 :00 to 4 :50. 

7. Biological Survey. A continuation of the previous year's work 
in the physical and biological features of Winona Lake and 
its environs. Professor Eigenmann. 
Summer terms at the Biological Station. 

The results obtained by students in Courses 3, 6 and 7, 
together with articles of the permanent staff of the De- 
partment, are published in various ways as contributions 
from the Zoological Laboratory of Indiana University. 
Of this series 97 numbers have been completed. A list of 
the titles from 1 to 58 was published in the Bulletin, vol. 
I, No. 4 (November, 1903), and subsequent additions in 
catalogue numbers of the Bulletin, vols. I, III, IV, V, and 
VI. Ninety-two numbers have been published. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

Burton I). Myers, Professor. 
AUGUSTUS <J. POHLMAN, Professor. 

Undergraduates selecting Anatomy as their major sub- 
ject are required to complete Courses 1, la, 2, 2c/, 3, 4, 5, 8, 
a total of 34 hours, with such further work in Courses 9, 
in, and 15 as in the particular case may seem desirable. 
In addition the candidate must have had 15 hours' Physi- 
ology or 12 hours' Pathology, and Zoology 21. 



GB \m \ti; SCHOOL 79 

Graduate courses are given under Course 13, the work 
of Courses 9, 11. and 15 being undergraduate or graduate, 
according to the character of the work and preparation 
for the course. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 
1. la, -. 2a and 3. Dissection, 17 hours. 

4. Osteology. 3 hours. 

5. Neurology. 4 hours. 
S. Histology. 10 hours. 

10. Histological Technique. 2-5 hours. 

14. Elementary Anatomy. 5 hours. 
16. Clinical Anatomy. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES OR GRADUATES 
9. Topographical Anatomy. 

11. Splanchnology. 

15. Advanced courses in Anatomy. 

COURSE FOR GRADUATES 

13. Research Work. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 

William J. Moenkhacjs, Professor. 
Dennis E. Jackson, Assistant Professor. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts with 
Physiology as the major subject take Courses 3 or 4, 5, 6 
and 7. Facilities for research leading to the higher de- 
grees are available within restricted lines in general 
Physiology. 



80 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 
1. Elementary Physiology and Hygiene. 5 hours. 
•*!. General Physiology. 10 hours. 
-J. Human Physiology. 9 hours. 
5. Experimental Physiology. 6 hours. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

<*>. Advanced Physiology. A comprehensive experimental study of 
some selected phase of mammalian physiology or of general 
physiology. .Laboratory work and assigned reading. Pro- 
fessor Moexkhaus. 
Fa. 11. Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 

7. Pharmacology. An experimental course in the physiological 
action of the more important drugs upon mammals and am- 
phibia. Assistant Professor Jackson. 

Spring' term. M. W. F., 1:00 to 4:50. 

Open to students who have passed in Courses 4 and .">. 

COURSE FOR GRADUATES 

10. Research. Problem work in certain phases of general physi- 
ology may be taken by those properly equipped. Professor 
MOENKHAUS. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 3:50. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 
Henry It. Ai.burger, Professor. 

The Department of Pathology is located in four large, 
well-lighted rooms on the third floor of Wylie Hall. 
These consist of a very large main laboratory, a lecture 
room and museum, an incubator and sterilizing room, and 
,-i private office for the head of the Department. 

The main Laboratory is capable of seating fifty or more 
workers a1 laboratory desks, is Lighted from the north bv 




GB VIM" ATI' 

large ^ indows running I 
lights, and contains .1 t'ulj 
teriology and Patholoj 

built in two smaller roi 
ogy and Pathology and 

into the main room by an 
room, containing incubators, si 
blood serum inspissator, water 
trie centrifuges. The room also 
mals for immediate use. 

Nex1 to the main laboratory is a smaller 
of si 'at mi;- fifty students at lecture. It is ah 
a museum. Here a collection of gross pathologl 
mens is rapidly being accumulated and mounted 
ner convenient for study and' reference. 

The office of the head of the Department is near at 
hand and is furnished with a very complete working ref- 
erence library containing the majority of the periodicals 
on the subjects covered by the Department, in English, 
< rerman and French. 

In connection with the Department there is an animal 
barn in which are kept a number of the small laboratory 
animals for use in research. 

The apparatus and equipment is ample for any ordi- 
nary line of research in Pathology, and is of the best 
quality. Xo expense has been spared by the University 
to make the equipment of this Department complete. 

The undergraduate work consists of three terms' work 
of six hours each, covering the subjects of Bacteriology, 
General Pathology, and Special Pathology. (See Cata- 
logue.) 









.UNIVEBSITY 






•ERGRADUATKS 



hours. 



IE FOR GRADUATES 

PTk and research. Those who have had sufficient 
or who show especial ability may obtain an oppor- 
y to enter upon advanced diagnostic work or research 
under the direction of the head of the Department. 
r s opportunity can only be offered to a limited number. 
PJTit facilities can be offered for work along any of the lines 
if Pathological or Bacteriological research. Professor 
Alp.ukgee. 
11. Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 



..— 



Vol. VII. No. 



1 1 ink 1, 1 <>()<> 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 



BULLETIN 




GRADUATE SCHOOL 
1909 



Entered as. second-class matter May 16, 1908, at the postoflice at Bloom : ngton, Indiana, 
under act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



s 

Ml 'I l 



"The highest Function of the real University 
is that of Instruction by Investigation. The Es- 
sential Quality of the University is the presence 
in its Faculty of Men qualified to do University 
Work. It matters not how many or how few the 
Subjects taught, or what may be the Material 
Equipment of the Teacher, the School in which 
Study and Investigation go hand in hand is, in its 
degree, A University." — David Starr Jordan. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



VOL. VII BLOOMINGTON, IND., JUNE I, 1909 NO. 5 

Entered as second-class matter May 16, 1908, at the postoffice at Bloomington, Indiana, under 
the Act of July 16, 1894 . Published from the University office, Bloomington, Indiana, semi-monthly 
April, May. and June, and monthly January, February, March, July, September, and November. 



Historical Sketch of Graduate School 



The Indiana University, situated at Bloomington, In- 
diana, is the State University of Indiana and the head of 
the public school system of the State. It takes its origin 
from the State Seminary, which was established by act of 
the Legislature, approved January 20, 1820. In 1828 the 
title of the Seminary was changed by the Legislature to 
that of the Indiana College; and in 1838 the University 
was given its present name and style. In 1867 Indiana 
University became coeducational. 

The University consists at present of— 
The College of Liberal Arts, organized in 1824, 
The Law School, organized in 1842, re-organized in 1889, 
The School of Medicine, organized in 1903, 
The Graduate School, organized in 1904, 
The School of Education, organized in 1908. 

The first advanced degrees, conferred for graduate 
work, were granted in 1882. During the eighties well de- 
li 11 ed regulations for graduate work and graduate degrees 
were slated in the University catalogue, and a consider- 
able number of graduate students were enrolled, especi- 



4 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

ally in the natural sciences. In the years 1882 to 1893, 
inclusive, the University graduated 14 Doctors of Phi- 
losophy, 99 Masters of Arts, and 12 Masters of Science. 
For some years following 1893, however, the degree 
Doctor of Philosophy was not conferred. 

In 1904 there took place a segregation and formal or- 
ganization of the Graduate School, and in 1908 the office 
of Dean of the Graduate School was created. 

An outline of the scholarly work of the University to 
the time of the organization of the Graduate School will 
be found on pages 197-348 of the volume entitled 'Indiana 
University, 1820-1904'. About 4,000 titles of books and 
articles by members of the University are there listed. 

Recent contributions to knowledge by members of the 
University, not listed in the above mentioned volume, are 
given in the present Bulletin, at the end of the statements 
of the various Departments. The numbers prefixed to 
the titles are in continuation of those given in the bibliog- 
raphy published in 1904. 



Contents 



PAGE 

ITniversiti Calendar 6 

I Officers and Faci ltt of Graduate School 7 

I rENER \1. STA FKMF.XT 10 

Purpose and Administration 10 

Admission 10 

Fees 11 

Buildings 12 

The Library 13 

Departmental Clubs 14 

Degrees 15 

Master of Arts 15 

Doetor of Philosophy 16 

Application for Degrees 17 

Teaching Fellowships 17 

Departments and Graduate Courses 19 

Greek 19 

Latin 21 

Romance Languages 23 

German 25 

Comparative Philology 28 

English 31 

History and Political Science 32 

Economics and Social Science 37 

Philosophy 42 

Fine Arts .' 46 

Mathematics 47 

Mechanics and Astronomy 52 

Physics 55 

Chemistry 66 

< reology 60 

Botany 73 

Zoology 77 

Anatomy 87 

Physiology 86 

Pathology 89 

Education 90 

(5) 



University Calendar 



FALL TERM, 1909-10 



Sept. 21, Tuesday. 



Sept. 22, Wednesday. 

Nov. 25 and 26, Thursday 

and Friday. 
Dec. 22, Wednesday, 6 p. m. 



Matriculation and registration of stu- 
dents; enrollment in classes. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 

Thanksgiving recess. 
Fall term ends. 



WINTER TERM, 1909-10 



Jan. 4, Tuesday. 

Jan. 5, Wednesday. 
Jan. 20. Thursday. 
Feb. 22, Tuesday. 
Mar. 25, Friday, 



6 p. m. 



Registration and enrollment in classes 

for the Winter term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Foundation day, a holiday. 
Washington's birthday, a holiday. 
Wintei term ends. 



SPRING TERM, 1909-10 



April 5, Tuesday. 



April 6, Wednesday. 
June 17, Friday, 6 p. m. 

June 19, Sunday, 7:30 p. m. 
June 22, Wednesday, 1" a. m. 



Registration and enrollment in classes 

for Spring term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Spring term ends. 
Baccalaureate address. 
( !om men cement. 



(6) 



Officers and Faculty of the Graduate 
School 



ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

CABL II ElGENMANN, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

Harold Whetstone Johnston, Ph.D., L.H.D., Professor of Latin. 

A u i ii in Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Ulysses GRANT Weatiiekly, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and 
Social Science. 

ERNEST HlBAM Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psy- 
chology. 

Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

FACULTY 

William Lowe Bryan, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University. 

Horace Addison Hoffman, A.M., Professor of Greek. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., Professor of American History and 

Politics. 
Cake H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, and Director of 

the Biological Station. 
Harold Whetstone Johnston, Ph.D., L.H.D., Professor of Latin. 
Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 
David Myers Mottier, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 
Albert Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance 

Languages. 

(7) 



8 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and 
Social Science. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psy- 
chology. 

Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

Amos Siiartle Hershey, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and 
International Law. 

Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

William A Rawles, Ph.D., Professor of Political Economy. 

Garl W. F. Osthaus, Professor of German. 

Schuyler Golfax Dayisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Warner Fite, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Augustus Grote Poiilman, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Henry Rihl Alburger, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Professor of the Science and Art of 
Teaching. 

Elmer Ellsworth Jones, Ph.D., Professor of the History and Phi- 
losophy of Education. 

Giiarles Jacob Sembower, A.M., Professor of English. 

Edgar Roscoe Gumings, Ph.D., Professor Geology. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

(J lido Hermann Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Gomparative 
Philology. 

Rolla Roy Ramsey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

OLIVER W Brown, A.M., Associate Professor of Ghemisliy. 

Frank Marion Andrews, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

LILLIAN Gay Berry, A.M., Associate Professor of Latin. 

Henry Tiikw Stephenson, B.S., A.B.. Associate Professor 01 

English. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL U 

FRANK AYDELOTTE, A.M., B.Litt., Associate Professor of English. 
Wilbur Adelman Cogshall, A.M., Associate Prof essor of Astronomy. 
li.vssis Sherman Hanna, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 
Joshua William Beede, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology. 
Edward Payson Morton, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 
James M Van Hook. A.M., Assistant Professor of Botany. 
Frank Curry Mathers, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Clarence Earl May, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Dennis Emerson Jackson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
VERNON Andrew Suydam, B.S., Instructor in Mechanics. 



General Statement 



Purpose and Administration. The Graduate School 
furnishes opportunities for advanced work leading to 
careers in higher education and in certain lines of investi- 
gation. It does not offer work leading to professional de- 
grees in Law or in Medicine. 

The work of the School is a direct continuation of that 
of the College of Liberal Arts, and as such is the most 
advanced work in education undertaken by the State. 
The Graduate School stands, therefore, at the head of the 
University, and is the culmination of the public school 
system of the State. 

The school is administered by the Council of the Grad- 
uate School. It is composed of members of the Faculty 
representing different fields of learning. 

Not all Departments of the University are at present 
equally equipped for extended graduate work. In recog- 
nition of this fact, the amount and nature of the graduate 
work offered by the different Departments varies. Some 
Departments offer work for the A.M. degree only, while 
others offer work leading to the degree Ph.D. 

Admission. Students holding the degree A. B. from 
Hi is institution, or the same degree or its equivalent from 
similar educational institutions, are admitted to the 
Graduate School on presentation of the proper credentials. 

All graduate students will enrol] at tin 1 beginning of 
each term, and those entering regularly organized classes 
will submit to the same regulations as undergraduate stu- 
dents. Work will in many cases be individual and not 

(10) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 11 

controlled by a recitation schedule At the time of en- 
trance to the Graduate School the student must submit a 
plan of the entire work he wishes to present for the A.M. 
or Ph.D. degree. This plan must be approved by the pro- 
fessor of the major subject and the Dean of the Graduate 

School. 

Fees. Tuition in the University is free. A contingent 
fee of five dollars a term is charged all students. It covers 
in part the cost of the physical maintenance of the Univer- 
sity, and is not applied to the cost of tuition, which is 
provided wholly by the State. 

The Library fee is one dollar a term. 

The Laboratory fees are one dollar per credit hour in 
all courses. 

The Gymnasium fee. if the work in physical training- 
is taken, is one dollar a term. 

An Examination fee of one dollar is charged for each 
make-up or special examination. This fee is paid to the 
Bursar, and his receipt when presented to the proper 
instructor constitutes his authorization for holding the 
examination. 

The fee for any Degree is five dollars, and must be 
paid to the Bursar at least thirty days before the grant- 
ing of the degree, and a receipt for it filed with the 
Registrar. 

Expenses. The expenses of the student will vary, of 
course, according to his mode of living. Most of the stu- 
dents lodge in private houses and board in clubs. Rooms 
occupied by one person vary as to rent from one dollar to 
three dollars a week. Two students rooming together 
pay as a rule from one to two dollars each; at the latter 
rate, fuel and light should be included. Rooms are gen- 
erally engaged by the term and are paid for weekly. 



12 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Board may be had in clubs at two dollars and a half to 
three dollars and a half a week, payable weekly. Board 
in hotels and restaurants costs from four to five dollars. 

Building's. The campus of the University adjoins the 
town, and contains about seventy acres of elevated 
ground, partly covered with a heavy growth of maple 
and beech. 

The University offices are in Maxwell Hall, a fireproof 
building of white limestone, erected in 1890, which, with 
an extension recently completed, also houses the School 
of Law. 

Owen Hull, a brick building erected in 1884, contains 
the museum, and (at present) the lecture rooms and 
laboratories of the Departments of Zoology and Botany. 

Wylie Hall, also of brick, erected in 1884, contains the 
laboratories and lecture rooms of the Departments of 
Chemistry and Pathology, and the rooms of the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics. 

Kirktvood Hall, of white limestone, built in 1895, con- 
tains the rooms of the Departments of English, History. 
Economics, Greek, Latin, Romance Languages, and 
German. 

Mitchell Hall is a frame building formerly used for the 
Women's Gymnasium. 

Kirkwood Observalory, completed in 1900, is a two-story 
building of white limestone, occupied by the Department 
of Mechanics and Astronomy. 

The Men's Gymnasium, a large frame building finished 
in 1896, is used also as an assembly hall for public exer- 
cises and entertainments. 

Science Hall, built in 1903 of limestone, is one of the 
largest buildings on the campus, and is occupied by the 



GEADUATE SCHOOL 13 

Departments of Physics. Philosophy, Education, Geology, 
Anatomy, and Physiology. 

The Lib rani Building, completed in 1908, houses also 
the collections of the Department of Fine Arts. 

The construction of a New Science Building, to be 
occupied principally by the biological sciences, will be be- 
gun in the fall of 1909. 

A Student Building of white limestone contains an east 
wing- for men students, a west wing for women students 
(including the Women's gymnasium and swimming pool), 
and a small auditorium in the center seating 600 persons. 

For an account of the buildings of the Biological Sta- 
tion see under the Department of Zoology. 

The Library. The Library of Indiana University at 
present contains sixty-six thousand catalogued volumes. 
The selection of these books has been made by experts 
within the last twenty-two years with a view to facilita- 
ting instruction and research. While the collection is a 
well-balanced one, it is especially strong in literary and 
scientific periodicals. The list of periodicals received and 
permanently kept on file by the library numbers about 
four hundred publications, including American, English, 
German, and French, and one each of Italian, Spanish, 
and Swedish. The library is made thoroughly usable by 
a carefully-made card catalogue, by indexes, and other 
bibliographical aids. The Library force consists of a li- 
brarian and ten assistants, all of whom are at the service 
of any authorized user of the library. 

In the library building are seminary rooms for the 
Departments of History, Economics, English, Philosophy, 
Modern Languages, Educational, Latin, and Greek. 

In addition to the central library where the general, 



14 . INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

literary, and historical collections are housed, there are 
nine departmental collections of varying sizes kept in 
the different University buildings. 

All books, with the exception of periodicals and books 
reserved for reference, may be drawn for home use, each 
student having the privilege of drawing' three books for 
two weeks. 

The 'Library is open Mondays to Fridays from 7:45 
a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and Saturdays from 8:00 a.m to 5:00 
p.m. 

Departmental Clubs. The Physics Club, an organiza- 
tion of the teachers and advanced students of the Physics 
Department, meets fortnightly to hear reports on research 
work and to discuss recent advances in physical science. 

A History Club, composed of the History faculty, 
graduate students and seniors majoring in History, and 
such other students as may be elected to membership, meets 
fortnightly to discuss topics of historical interest and to 
promote social intercourse. 

The Philosophy Club, composed of instructors and stu- 
dents of the Department of Philosophy, holds fortnightly 
meetings for the discussion of philosophical questions. 

The English Club, consisting of the English instruct- 
ors, students who have English as their major, and such 
other students as may be elected to membership, meets 
once each fortnight. The purpose of the club is to pro- 
mote good fellowship. 

The Euclidian Circle is a mathematical club made up 
of instructors and students above Freshman rank. Its 
meetings are held on the second and fourth Mondays of 
each month. 

The Goethe Gesellschaft is a club composed of men 
and women interested in German, and has for its object 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 15 

the practical study of the German language and the pro- 
motion of the social advantages of its members. 

The Cercle FYangais, reorganized in 1905, is a club 
open to all members of the Departmenl of Romance Lan- 
guages past the Freshman year, and twice a month holds 
social gatherings at which French alone is spoken. 

The Zoological Club, organized in 1882, meets every 
Monday during term time. 

The Geological Club, organized in 1907, meets on alter- 
nate Wednesdays during term time. 

The Graduate Club of the School of Education has for 
its purpose the promotion of research in Education, and 
the encouragement of fellowship and cooperativeness 
among the graduate members of the School of Education. 

DEGREES 

Two advanced degrees, Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy, are conferred by the University. 

Master of Arts. The degree of Master of Arts may 
be conferred upon graduates of this University, or of any 
other institution of equivalent standing, following a resi- 
dence at the University of a minimum of three full terms 
and the completion of a minimum of forty-five hours of 
University credit. Thirty of the total of forty-five hours 
in nst be in one Department, or in closely allied Depart- 
ments. Fifteen hours must be distinctly graduate in char- 
acter. Graduates of this University may be given leave 
of absence for one term of the required year to pursue a 
specific investigation. 

Of the required three terms of residence, graduates of 
other institutions shall take at least two terms in suc- 
cession. 



16 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Iii or before June, 1910, the Master's degree may be 
conferred upon graduates of this University upon the com- 
pletion in absence of fifteen hours a term, or equivalent 
work, carried during at least two full years under the di- 
rection of the Faculty, hours of private work done in ab- 
sence being estimated at one-half the credit value of work 
done at the University. After June, 1910, no degrees will 
be conferred for work in private non-residence study. 

Professional studies are not accepted for this degree, 
but research work on professional subjects may be ac- 
cepted at the option of the professor in charge of the 
major subject. 

A thesis is required in all Departments except that of 
Latin. 

Doctor of Philosophy. The degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy may be conferred upon graduates of this Univer- 
sity, or of any institution of similar character and rank, 
upon the completion of an advanced course of study of no 
less than three years. On the recommendation of the pro- 
fessor in charge of the major subject, and with the concur- 
rence of the Council of the Graduate School, part of this 
time may be spent in study at other universities. 

The course of study for the degree of Doctor of Phil- 
osophy must be pursued under the direction of a com- 
mit tec consisting of the heads of the Departments in which 
the work is done, and its value shall be determined by a 
final examination and by tin 1 presentation of a satisfac- 
tory thesis, usually embodying original work upon some 
prescribed or accepted subject, and which must always 
give evidence that Hie candidate is capable of forming an 
independent judgment upon the recent literature of his 
department. In each case a detailed statement, indorsed 
by Hie professor in charge of the major work, shall be 



GB \IM.\TK SCHOOL 17 

submitted to the Council of the Graduate School not later 
than May 10 of the year in which the candidate presents 
himself for examination. 

The thesis of every candidate for the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy shall be presented to the Council of the Grad- 
uate School on or before the first day of June of the 
year in which he proposes to take the degree. The thesis 
shall be indorsed by the head of the Department as being 
in its final form and ready for the press. Examinations of 
each candidate for this degree will be conducted before a 
committee consisting of all the instructors under whom 
graduate work has been taken. If the candidate is recom- 
mended for the degree, arrangements must be made to 
deposit five printed copies of the thesis in the library. 

At least one year before the final examination the can- 
didate shall satisfy the professor in charge of the major 
subject of his ability to use French and German for pur- 
poses of investigation. 

Application for Degrees. Application for the degree 
Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy must be filed with 
the Dean at the time of admission to the Graduate School. 
Application for the degree Doctor of Philosophy must be 
on file at least one year before the candidate is admitted 
to the examination. 

TEACHING FELLOWSHIPS 

A number of teaching fellowships are available for 
graduate students. 

The Teaching Fellows are relieved from all term 
fees, and the fellowship carries with it an honorarium of 
between $200.00 and $500.00 annually. The highest 
amount will ordinarily be paid only if the incumbent is 

[2] 



18 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

appointed for a third year. A Teaching Fellowship is 
primarily a recognition of scholarship. Not less than 
two-thirds of each Fellow's time must be devoted to work 
leading to the Doctorate in Philosophy ; but he will be re- 
quired to give a portion of his time to the University. 

A Fellow may be appointed for three separate years, 
but not for more. Appointments are for one year, and 
do not imply a reappointment. 

Following is the list of Teaching Fellows for 1908-09: 

Roscoe Beals, A.B., Teaching- Fellow in English. 
Caroline Anna Black, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Botany. 
Walter Blaine Duncan, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 
Cecil Otis Gamble, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 
Albert Frederick O. (Hermann, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Chemistry. 
Charles Clancy Grandy, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Pathology. 
('oka Barbara Hennel, A.M., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics. 
Ballington Charles Kettleborough, A.M., Teaching Fellow in 

History. 
Edward William Koch, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Physiology. 
Norman Eugene McIndoo, A.B., Fellow in charge of Donaldson 

Farm Experiment Station. 
Carl William Parker, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Economics. 
Homer Blosser Reed, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Psychology. 
Mabel Tibbott, A.B., Teaching Fellow in History. 
William Motier Tucker, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Geology. 
Kenneth Powers Williams, A.B., Teaching Fellow in Mathematics. 
WILLIAM Logan Woodburn, A.B.. Teaching Fellow in Botany. 



Departments and Graduate Courses of 
Instruction 



In the following list are included many courses which 
are open alike to graduates and advanced underclassmen. 
The strictly undergraduate courses are described in the 
catalogue of the University. 

DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

Horace A. Hoffman, Professor. 
Frank W. Tilden, Associate Professor. 

Undergraduates choosing Greek as their major sub- 
ject are required to take sixty hours' work in the Depart- 
ment, selected after consultation with the professor. 

The time that at the present may be profitably devoted 
to graduate work in Greek is one year, leading to the de- 
gree of A.M. 

The Department is well equipped for doing satis- 
factory work leading to the degree of Master of Arts. 
Besides the most important reference books, cyclopaedias, 
dictionaries, lexicons, indexes, and standard editions of 
Greek writers, an effort has been made to build up an es- 
pecially good collection of works treating of Euripides, 
since seminary work is offered in that author. The De- 
partment has the chief older editions as well as nearly all 
of the later ones, and many special works bearing on 
Euripides. 

The Library contains the most important classical 
journals, among them complete sets of 'The American 

cm 



20 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Journal of Philology' ; 'The American Journal of Archae- 
ology'; 'The Classical Review'; Chicago, Cornell, and 
Harvard Studies ; 'Hermes'; 'Jahrbiicher fiir classische 
Philologie'; Mitteilungen d. deutsch. arch. Inst, in Athen'; 
'Philologus'; 'Rheinisches Museum'. 

Among the most valuable works in the field of Archae- 
ology and Art the following may be named: 'Antike 
Denkmaler' ; ' Ausgrabungen von Olympia' ; ' Carapanos' ; 
'Dodona'; Hamdey-Bey and Reinach's "Necropole a 
Sidon ' ; Homolle 's ' Fouilles de Delphes ' ; Ohnef alsch- 
Richter's 'Cypros, die Bibel und Homer'; Overbeck's 
'Griechische Kunstmythologie'; Stackelberg's 'Die Gra- 
ber der Hellenen'; and the publications of the American 
and British Schools of Athens, and of the Egyptian Ex- 
ploration Fund. Among the works on Inscriptions and 
Epigraphy the following may be mentioned : ' Corpus 
Inscriptionum Graecarum'; 'Corpus Inscriptionum At- 
ticarum'; Inscr. Graec. Septentrionalis, Siciliae, Italiae, 
Pelopon., Insularum, etc., and the important writings of 
such authorities as Klein, Kretschmer, Meisterhans, etc. 
For Palaeography and the study of the Papyri are the 
following: Works by Grenfell, Hunt, Kenyon, Mahaffy, 
Mayser, Mitteis, Thompson and Wilkin. In the import- 
ant field of vase-painting, the Library contains many valu- 
able works. Among the most noteworthy are: Benn- 
dorf's 'Griechische and Sicilische Vasenbilder' ; Collignon 
and Rayet's 'Histoire de la Ceramique grecque'; Deche- 
Lette's 'Les Vases ceramiques ornes de la Gaule romaine'; 
Purtwangler and Loesehke's 'Mykenische Vasen,' and 
'Mykenische Thongef asse ' ; Furtwangler and Reichhold's 
'Griechische Vasenmalerei ' ; Harrison and McColl's 'Types 
of Greek Vases.' and various hooks by Gardner, llnd- 
dilston, Klein, Kretschmer, Murray, Smith and Walters. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 21 

The Department also owns upwards of 700 photo- 
graphs of landscapes, buildings and works of art in 
Greece, ltaiy and Sicily: and has many lantern-slides, 
busts, casts, a model of the Acropolis at Athens, and a 
scries of reproductions of the famous Tanagra Figurines. 

to. Graduate Seminary: Euripides. (A) Wednesdays: 'The Phe- 
nicians'. Professor Hoffman. (B) Fridays: 'The Alces- 
tis'. Associate Professor Tilden. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. W. F.. 3:00 to 5:00. 

Open to graduates only. A reading knowledge of German is a 
requisite for the work. 



DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

Harold Whetstone Johnston, Professor of Latin. 
Lillian Gay Berry, Associate Professor. 
Keith Preston, Instructor. 

The Department is adequately equipped for the 
courses offered below. Besides sets of Classical journals 
and reviews (see the detailed statement above under the 
Department of Greek), the library contains the essential 
works of reference on the various disciplines, all general 
and special lexicons and indexes of recognized value, 
various sets of texts, the latest critical editions and com- 
mentaries, together with many of historical interest, and 
collections of monographs and dissertations intended to 
illustrate those authors that are made the subjects of 
special investigation and seminary work. The Depart- 
ment has an office and two recitation rooms in Kirkwood 
Hall, and shares with the Department of Greek a semi- 
nary room in the Library. The private library of the 
head of the Department is at the service of graduate 
students. 



22 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

[33. The Prose Writers of the Republic. Selections from Cato, 
Sallust, Cicero, and Hirtius, with the critical study of the 
text of one of these authors so far as it is read in the class 
Students are expected to be able to read German. Professor 
Johnston.] 

Course 33 and 34 are given in alternate years. 

Omitted in 1909-10. 

34. The Poets of the Republic. Selection from Plant us, Terence. 
Lucretius, and Catullus, with the critical study of the text 
of some one of these authors so far as read in the class. 
Fall, Winter and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9 :00. 

If course 33 is taken in the undergraduate course. 
Course 34 should be made a part of the graduate work, 
and vice versa. 

41. The Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. Recita- 

tions, lectures, and assigned readings. Associate Professor 

Berry. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be 

arranged. 
Platner, 'Ancient 1101110'. 

42. Readings in Latin Literature. The student will be guided and 

assisted in reading very considerable portions of those ;iu- 
thors not included in other courses, with stress laid upon the 
subject-matter rather than upon the language and style. An- 
alyses and summaries will be prepared by the students and 
criticised by (he instructor. Professor JOHNSTON and Asso- 
ciate Professor Berry. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be 
arranged. 

43. Advanced Composition. This course is intended especially for 

teachers, but may be taken by any persons who need practice 
in writing Latin. Professor Johnston and Mr. Preston. 

Fall, Wilder, and Spring terms, once ;i week, at an hour to be 
;i rranged. 

Open to graduates and teachers of Latin. 



Graduate school 23 

Seminary. The critical study of the text of some standard 

author, with incidental investigation of problems in syntax, 
style, prosody, and so forth. In past years Caesar, Sallust, 
Tacitus, and Plautus have been made the subjects of similar 
work. In 1909-10 it is proposed to make a study of Terence. 
The student should be provided with the critical edition of 
Umpfenbach and the text editions of Dziatzko and Fleck- 
eisen. Professor Johnston. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M., 2:00 to 3:50. 

Open to students who have had one year's graduate work. 



DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

ALBERT F. Kuersteinek, Professor of Romance Languages. 
George D. MORRIS, Associate Professor of French. 
Charles A. Mosemiller, Associate Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

Undergraduates electing* Romance Languages as their 
major subject are required to take sixty hours of work in 
the Department. The choice of courses must be approved 
by the head of the Department. 

The Department offers one year of Graduate work, all 
in French. 

The Library is well equipped with works in French 
criticism. It contains, moreover, all of the volumes of the 
'Grands Ecrivains de la France' series published thus far, 
and complete sets of 'Romania,' 'Zeitschrift fur Ro- 
manische Philologie,' 'Archiv fiir das Studium der Neu- 
eren Sprachen, ' 'Franzosische Studien, ' 'Revue des deux 
Alondes,' 'Revue de Cours et Conferences,' 'Biblioteca de 
Autores Espafioles,' besides a fair selection of works in 
French and Spanish literature. 



24 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

13. Old French. Reading- of texts; study of derivations, and an 
exposition of the simpler phonetic laws involved in the 
change from Popular Latin into Old French and Modern 
French. Lectures. Professor Kuersteiner. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 9 :00. 

Paris, 'Extraits de la Chanson de Roland' ; Suchier, 'Aucassin 
et Nicolete' (French edition) ; Paris-Langiois, Threstoina- 
thie du Moyen Age'. 

Open to graduate students who have studied French and Latin, 
and also to undergraduates who have passed in Courses 
4 and 19. 

; 28. Senior Composition. Drill in translation of literary English 
into literary French. Writing of French themes and letters. 
The work is conducted in French. Associate Professor 

MOSEMILLER. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 3:00. 

Open to students who have passed in Courses 1, 4, and 2G, or 

their equivalent.] 
Omitted in 1908-09. 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Charles A. Mosemiller. 

3. 'Etymology of m&che-fer'. In Modern Language Notes, Dec, 
1905. 

4. 'Etymologies of cotret, deche, palier, sabliere\ In Modern 
Language Notes, May, 1907. 

5. 'Trumeau, trumer, trimer et quelques autres derives du latin 
torus <"ii Gaule'. hi Modern Language Notes, May, 1908. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 25 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Bert J. Vos, Professor of German. 
CABL W. F, OSTHATJS, Professor. 
EUGENE Leser, Assistant Professor. 

Iii combination with the Department of Comparative 
Philology, which gives courses in Gothic and Old High 
German, the Department at present offers two years of 
Graduate work. The library is well equipped with books 
for the special study of Classical and Nineteenth Century 
German literature. The list of current publications re- 
ceived includes the following: 'Alemannia'; 'Allge- 
meine Zeitung' (Miinchen) ; 'Archiv fiir das Studium dor 
aeuereu Sprachen und Literaturen ' ; 'Arkiv for nordisk 
Filologi'; 'Beitrage zur Geschichte der deutschen Sprache 
und Literatur'; 'Bibliothek des litterarischen Vereins in 
Stuttgart'; 'Columbia University Germanic Studies'; 'Das 
Litterarische Echo'; 'Euphorion'; 'Forschungen zur 
neueren Literaturgeschichte' ; 'German-American An- 
nals'; 'Goethe Jahrbuch'; ' Indogermanische Forschun- 
gen'; 'Jahrbuch des freien deutschen Hochstifts'; 'Jahr- 
buch der Grillparzer Gesellschaft' ; 'Jahrbuch des Vereins 
fiir niederdeutsche Sprachforschung' ; ' Jahresbericht 
iiber die Erseheinungen auf dem Gebiete der Germa- 
nisehen Philologie'; ' Jahresberichte fiir neuere deutsche 
Litteraturgeschichte ' ; 'Journal of English and Germanic 
Philology'; 'Korrespondenzblatt des Vereins fiir nieder- 
deutsche Sprachforschung'; ' Literaturblatt fiir germa- 
nische und romanische Philologie'; 'Modern Language 
Notes': 'Modern Language Review'; 'Modern Philol- 
ogy': 'Publications of the Modern Language Association 
of America '; 'Quelleii und Forschungen ' ; 'Veroffentli- 
chungen des Schwabischen Schiller Vereins'; 'Zeitschrift 



26 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

des Allgemeinen deutschen Sprachvereins'; 'Zeitschrift 
des Vereins fiir Volkskunde ' ; 'Zeitschrift fur Biicher- 
freunde'; 'Zeitschrift fiir deutsches Altertum'; 'Zeit- 
schrift fiir den deutschen Unterricht'; 'Zeitschrift fiir 
deutsche Mundarten'; 'Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Philolo- 
gie'; 'Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Wortforschung' ; 'Zeit- 
schrift fiir vergleichende Litteraturgeschichte'. 

For Gothic and Old High German, see Courses 4 and 9 
of the Department of Comparative Philology. Course 14 
may be taken either as a graduate or undergraduate 
course. 
14. German Usage. A study of the more difficult points in Ger- 
man grammar, with reference to the spoken language of the 
present day and to the usage of representative authors. De- 
signed especially for students who intend to teach German. 
Assistant Professor Leser. 
Winter and Spring terms, T. Th., at an hour to be appointed. 
Matthias, 'Kleiner Wegweiser durch die Schwankungen und 
Schwierigkeiten des deutschen Sprachgebrauchs'. 

110. German Romanticism. Lectures, discussions, and reports.] 
Omitted in 1900-10. 

[20. Lessing : Life and Works. Lectures, and reports by members 
of the class upon subjects assigned for special study.] 
Omitted in 1000-10. 

[21. Studies in the recent German Drama. Professor OSTHAUS.] 
Omitted in 1000-10. 

2S. Journal Club. This course is introductory to the work of the 
German Seminary. Members make reports upon the con- 
tents of current numbers of journals devoted to German 
literature and philology, and are trained in the use of im- 
portant works of reference. Professor Vos. 
Fall term, two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 

22. German Seminary: Goethe's Lyrical Poems. Professor Vos. 
Winter and Spring terms, two hours weekly, at an hour to be 

appointed. 
open to students who liavc completed Course 28. 



GBADUATE SCHOOL 27 

[27. .Middle High German. Outline of the phonology, accidence and 
syntax. Reading of selections from the lyric poets, the popu- 
lar and court epic. Professor Vos.] 

29. History of the German Language. The relation of German 
to other Germanic languages ; the dialectic divisions of 
Modern German; origins of the literary language; changes 
since the middle period; history of German orthography. 
Conducted partly in German. Professor Vos. 
Winter term, two hours weekly, at an hour to he appointed. 
Behaghel, 'Die deutsche Sprache' ('Das Wissen der Gegen- 
wart', Band 54). 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Ernest H. Biermann. 

1. 'German Prose Composition'. (Joint author with C. W. F. 
Osthaus.) New York, 1909. Pp. 191. 

2. 'Easy German Stories by C. E. Ries. With notes and 
vocabulary'. New York, 1909. Pp. 180. 

Charles D. Campbell. 

1. 'The Names of Relationship in English. A contribution to 
English semasiology'. (Strassburg Dissertation.) Strassburg, 1905. 
Pp. x, 139. 

Carl W. F. Osthaus. 

1. 'German Prose Composition'. (Joint author with E. H. 
Biermann.) New York, 1909. Pp. 191. 

Bert John Vos. 

1. Review of 'The Saga of Walther of Aquitaine', by M. D. 
Learned. Modern Language Notes, viii, 377-380. 

2. Review of Henrici's edition of Hartmann von Aue's 'Iwein'. 
Modern Language Notes, ix, 185-189. 

3. Review of Wilmanns' 'Deutsche Grammatik' (Gotisch, Alt- 
Mittel- und Neuhochdeutsch). Modern Language Notes x, 34-39. 

4. 'The Diction and Rime-Technic of Hartman von Aue'. New 
York and Leipzig, 1896. Pp. 74. 

5. 'Materials for German Conversation'. New York, 1900. Pp. 
v + 176. 



28 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

(5. 'Rime-Parallelism in Old High German Verso. Studies in 
honor of Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve'. Pp. 435-442. Baltimore, 1002. 

7. 'The Religion of the Teutons', by P. D. Chantepie de la Saus- 
saye, translated from the Dutch. Boston, 1902. Pp. viii + 504. 

8. Review of W. Kurrelmeyer's 'The historical Development of 
the Types of the first person plural Imperative in German'. Zeit- 
schrift fur deutschc Wortforschung II, 323-326. 

0. 'Kinder- und Hausmarchen der Bidder Grimm, selected and 
edited with an Introduction, Notes and a Vocabulary'. New York, 
1003. Pp. 191. 

10. 'Essentials of German'. New York, 1903. Pp. viii + 222. 
Second Edition, Revised. New York, 190G. Pp. 279. Third Edi- 
tion, Revised. New York, 1908. Pp. 287. 'Supplementary Exer- 
cises' to the same. New York, 1905. Pp. 47. 

11. 'Die Harzreise' von Heinrich Heine, edited with Introduc- 
tion, Notes and Vocabulary. Boston, 1908. Pp. 196. 

12. 'Notes on Heine' (i-vi), Modern Language Notes xxiii, 
25-28 and 39-43. 

13. Review of Howard and Sturtevaut's edition of Gottfried 
Keller's 'Das Fahnlein der sieben Aufrechten', Modern Language 
Notes xxiii, 251-252. 



DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY 

Guido H. Stempel, Associate Professor. 

The degree of A.B. in Comparative Philology may be 
conferred upon students who have a grounding in at least 
two foreign languages. The major requirement is forty- 
five hours in this Department, including Courses 1 and 2. 

The graduate courses offered will be extended as re- 
quired. They may be supplemented by certain of the 
courses listed as undergraduate, as well as by certain 
courses given in the other Language Departments and in 
History, Social Science (anthropology), Philosophy, and 
English. The time that can profitably be spent here in 
graduate study in philology is a1 present about two years. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 29 

The University Library contains about 2,000 volumes 
of philology. Upwards of fifty languages are repre- 
sented. <md a third of these have their history and cognate 
relationships fully illustrated. The chief philological 
periodicals and many of the other serial publications are 
on the shelves, quite generally in complete files. It may 
perhaps be said that the student of philology has access 
to a fairly satisfactory working library. 
[5. Comparative Philology of the Classical Languages. An ad- 
vanced course in the science of language and Indo-European 
philology. Each student will emphasize the particular lan- 
guage in which he has had special training. Associate Pro- 
fessor Stempel. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 
Giles, 'Manual of Comparative Philology for Classical Stu- 
dents'. 
Open to students who have passed in Courses 2 and 3, and in 
thirty hours of language, and to advanced students in Latin 
or Greek.] 
Not given in 1909-10. 

4. Gothic. Grammar and reading ; phonology of the early Ger- 
manic languages. Associate Professor Stempel. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Primer of the Gothic Language'. 

Open to students who have passed in Course 2 and in thirty 
hours of language, and to others at the option of the in- 
structor. 

Given every third year ; see Courses 9 and 10. 

[9. Old High German. Elements of the grammar, reading of se- 
lected texts, study of dialectal divergence. The method will 
be both comparative and historical. Associate Professor 
Stempel. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Old High German Primer ; Braune, 'Althochdeutsche 
Grammatik' ; Braune, 'Althochdeutsches Lesebuch'. 

Open to students on same conditions as Course 4.1 

Not given in 1909-10. Given every third year, following Course 
4 ; see Courses 4 and 10. 



30 INDIANA [TNIVEltSITY 

[10. Middle High German. (1) Fall term: Elements of the gram- 
mar, reading of easy texts, and study of the development of 
the German language. (2) Winter and Spring terms : 
Nibelungenlied, with special study of the popular epic. As- 
sociate Professor Stempel. 

Pall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Tli., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Middle High German Primer'; Paul, 'Mittelhoch- 
deutsche Graininatik' ; Robertson, 'Der arme Heinrich' ; 
Zarncke, 'Das Nibelungenlied'. 

Open to students on same conditions as Course 4. | 

Not given in 1909-10. Given every third year, following Course 
9 ; see Courses 9 and 10. 

11. Old Norse. Introduction to the language, and the reading of 
texts that throw light upon the popular literature of England 
and Germany. Associate Professor Stempel. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. P., at 10 :00. 

Sweet, 'Icelandic Primer' ; selected texts. 

Open to students who have passed in fifteen hours of Germanic 
philology and to others at the option of the instructor. 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

Guido H. Stempel. 

19. 'An Epoch-Remaking Book'. Review of Edwin Johnson's 
'Rise of English Culture'. In Dial, XXXVII, pp. 304-6. (Nov. 
1(1, 1904.) 

20. Review of Scott-Buck's 'Brief English Grammar'. /// 
School Review, XV, pp. 30(3-7. (Feb., 1907.) 

21. Review 7 of Thomas R. Lounsbury's 'Standard of Usage in 
English', and Jacob Zeitlin's 'Accusative with Infinitive 1 Construction 
in English'. In School Review (in Press). 



GB LDUATE SCHOOL .51 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Will I>. Howe, Professor of English. 
CHARLES J. SEMBOWER, Professor of English. 
Henbt T. Stephenson, Associate Professor of English. 
Frank Aydelotte, Associate Professor of English. 
♦Edward P. Morton, Assistant Professor of English. 

Undergraduate students who select the work of this 
Department for their major subject must take forty-five 
hours in English and thirty hours of collateral work ap- 
proved by the Department. Not more than fifteen hours 
of Public Speaking may be taken as collateral. 

At present, two years may be spent with profit in pur- 
suing the work which will lead toward the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. The Library is equipped for re- 
search work in several periods, is well provided with the 
principal periodicals and with the publications of most of 
the learned societies. The instructors of the Department 
will gladly direct competent advanced students in lines 
of investigation and research. 

17. Metrics. A study of modern English meter. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th. 

'.V.\. Literary Criticism. A study of the history and principles of 
literary criticism. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours each week. 

.'i."». CompositioD Seminary. A course in writing restricted to those 
who have passed with distinction in Course 15. Professor 
Howe, Associate Professors Sembower, Stephenson. 

12<7. Materials of Prose Fiction. Research course. Professor 
Howe. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours each week. 



*Absent on leave from August 1. 1908. 



32 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

12b. Seventeenth Century Literature. Research course. Associate 
Professor Sembower. 
Fall, AVinter, and Spring terms, two hours each week. 

12c. Chaucer. Research course. Associate Professor Aydelotte. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours each week. 

48. Courses of special study. The Department will encourage 
special study in the literature of any period or in topics 
which may he pursued with profit. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 

James A. Woodburn, Professor of American History and Politics. 

Samuel B. Harding, Professor of European History. 

Amos S. Hershey, Professor of Political Science and International 

Law. 
William Spence Robertson, Acting Professor of American His- 
tory (1909). 
*Tiiomas L. Harris, Instructor. 
Solon J. Buck, Instructor. 

Undergraduates selecting the work of this Department 
for their major subject must take forty-five hours in 
History and thirty hours collateral work approved by the 
Department. The latter must include Course 1 of the De- 
partment of Economics, and may include a maximum of 
fifteen hours selected from the courses in Political Science 
offered by this Department. 

The Department is prepared t<> offer research work 
leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. in the following fields: 
American Colonial History, the American Civil War and 
Reconstruction, English History in the Seventeenth and 
Nineteenth Centuries, the French Revolution, Diplomatic 
History, Political Philosophy, and International Law. In 



•Absenl on leave, 1909-10 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 33 

each of these fields good library collections are already at 
hand, to which constant additions arc being made. 

:>. Renaissance and Reformation, L300-1555. Lectures, text-book 
study, collateral reading, and preparation of papers. The 

concilia r movement for reform ; the Renaissance in Italy and 
Germany; the Protestant revolution in Germany. Switzer- 
land, and France; the Council of Trent and the Counter 
Reformation ; the religious peace of Augsburg. Professor 
Harding. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 

Should be accompanied by Fine Arts 4, T. Th., at 11 :00. 

13. France in the Middle Ages. A study of the institutions of 
mediaeval France, and of the processes whereby the feudal 
type of society was transformed into the modern state. Lec- 
tures, collateral reading, and reports on assigned topics. Pro- 
fessor Harding. 
Fall and Winter terms, T. Th., at 11 :00. 

16. Historical Method. The principles of historical investigation, 
with some practice in the use of sources and the preparation 
of papers. Professor Harding. 
Spring term. T. Th., at 9 :00. 

Langlois and Seignobos's 'Introduction to the Study of His- 
tory'. 

22. American Diplomatic History, 177G-1S76. A study of the sub- 
jects of chief importance in the international relations of the 
L'nited States from the time of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. Mr. Buck. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8 :00. 

28. American Political Discussions. A study of some of the more 
notable contributions to political and constitutional contro- 
versies in the national period of American history. Designed 
to introduce the student to a first-hand knowledge of the 
materials relating to the leading issues in our national de- 
velopment. Professor WOODBURN. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 9:00. 

Presupposes Course 18 or its equivalent. 

[3] 



34 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

'2(hi. Seminary in English History. Individual research work, under 
the guidance of the instructor, on some subject connected 
with modern English history. The results of the investiga- 
tions are presented from time to time as reports and are 
finally embodied in papers in form suitable for publication, 
of which a copy must be left with the Seminary. Professor 
Harding. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Hours for individual confer- 
ence to be arranged. 

20c. Seminary in American Constitutional and Political History. In 
1908-09 the period of the Civil War will be studied. Study 
of the sources, reports of investigations, and thesis work. 
Professor Woodbukn. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. M., at 4:00 to 5:30. 

Open to advanced students and graduates. 

24. History of Political Ideas and Theory of the State. A study 

of the nature, origin, form, and functions of the state, to- 
gether with an analysis of the structure and province of gov- 
ernment. A brief sketch or outline of the history of political 
ideas or theories will also be given. Professor IIersiiey. 

Spring term. M. W. F.. at 11 :00. 

Open to students who have passed in Course 23. or have had 
the equivalent of two years* work in History. Law, or Eco- 
nomics. 

Pollock. 'History of Political Ideas'; Leacock. 'Elements of 
Political Science." 

25. Public Intei-national Law. Subjects of international law; 

rights and duties of states in their normal relations; inter- 
vention; principles governing states in time of war; the 
law of neutrality; territorial property and jurisdiction: 
territorial waters; high seas; contraband; blockade, etc. 
Text-book work, lectures, and the study of cases and illus- 
trations drawn from the Uusso-Japanese War. Intended 
primarily for Hie Third year class in the School of Law, and 
Seniors and graduate students in history. Professor 
I [ERSHEY. 



GKRADUATE SCHOOL 35 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at an hour to be ap- 
pointed. 

Lawrence, 'International Law'; Hershey, 'The International 
Law and Diplomacy of the Russo-Japanese War'. 

20d. Seminary in International Law and Diplomacy. Research work 
and the special study of important topics, more especially 
of present-day problems. During recent years such sub- 
jects were selected as the Alabama Claims, the Panama 
Affair, the causes of the Russo-Japanese War, the 'Open 
Door' policy in China, and the genesis of the Monroe Doc- 
trine. Professor Hebshey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 
Open to Seniors and graduate students. 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OE THE DEPARTMENT 

Solon Justus Buck. A. M. 

I. 'The Settlement of Oklahoma'. / it Transactions of the Wis- 
consin Academy of Sciences. Arts, and Letters. XV, Pt. II (1907). 

Amos Siiartle Hershey, Ph.D. 

10. Series of eight articles on 'Some Questions of International 
Law Arising from the Russo-Japanese War". /// Oreen Bag. XVI 
(May to December. 1904). 

II. 'The Relations of England and the United States as Af- 
fected by the Ear-Eastern Question'. In Proceedings of the Ameri- 
can Political Science Association for 190.*), pp. 59-72. 

12. 'What Justifies Intervention in War?' In The Review of 
Reviews, XXXI (1905), 199-201. 

13. Review of Asakawa's 'Russo-Japanese Conflict". In Vale 
Review. XIV (May. 1905). pp. 98-94. 

14. Review of Maxey's 'International Law, with Illustrated 
Cases'. In American Political Science Review, I (1900), 148-151. 

15. 'The International Law and Diplomacy of the Russo- 
Japanese War'. Pp. XII. :594. New York. 1900. 

10. 'The Coming Peace Conference at the Hague'. In Xew 
York Independent. LX I (1906). 007-14. 

17. 'The Calvo and Drago Doctrines'. In American Journal of 
International Law, I. 24-45 (1907). 



36 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

18. 'The Japanese School Question and the Treaty-Making 
Power'. In American Political Science Review, I (1007), 393-409. 

10. 'The Forcible Collection of Contract Debts'. In Proceedings 
of the American Society of International Law for 1007. pp. 124-133. 

20. 'Why the Nations Cannot Disarm'. In Reader Magazine. 
X, 330-343 (1007). 

21. 'An International Prize Court'. In Green Bag, XIX, 
(1007). 

22. Review of Moore's 'International Law Digest'. In Colum- 
bia Law Review, VII (1007), 222-24. 

23. Review of Latane's 'America as a World Power'. In Ameri- 
can Historical Review, XIII (1008), pp. 025-26. 

24. Reviews of Ariga's 'La Guerre Russo-Japonaise au Point 
de Vue Continental et le Droit International' ; Takahashi's 'Inter- 
national Law as Applied to the Russo-Japanese War' ; and Rev's 'La 
Guerre Russo-Japonaise au Point de Vue de Droit International'. 
In American Journal of International Law, II (1008), pp. 042-051. 

25. 'The Convention for the Peaceful Adjustment of Interna- 
tional Differences'. In American Journal of International Law, II 
(1000), 20-40. 

2G. 'Les Doctrines de Calvo et de Drago'. French Translation 
of 'The Calvo and Drago Doctrines'. In 'La Doctrine de Drago', by 
II. A. Moulin, Paris, 1008. Pp. 173-202. 

27. 'The United States as a Peace Tower'. In American His- 
torical Review, XIII, pp. 440, and in The World of To-Day, Decem- 
ber, 1008, pp. 1254-57. 

28. 'Germany — The Main Obstacle to World's Peace'. In New 
York Independent, LXVI, 1071-76 (1000). 

2'.). Review of Coolidge's 'United States as a World Power". In 
American Historical Review, XIV (1000). pp. 372-74. 

30. Review of Hull's 'Two Hague Conferences and Their Con- 
tributions to International Law'. In American Historical Review 
XIV (1909), 384-85. 

itral Rights and Obligations on 
Science Review, III 

Drago'. /// American 



31. Review of 


Campbell's 


W'euln 


il Rig 


the Anglo-Boer Wa 


r\ /// Ami 


uican I 


'olitic; 


( 11)01)), pp. 11 1-1 K 


;. 






32. Review of 


Moulin's 'I 


>a Docti 


•ine d( 


Journal of Internal 


ional Law f'< 


>r July, 


1 !)<>!>. 



.;i; LDTJATE SCHOOL 37 

Whjjam Spence Robertson, Ph.D. 

1. ' 'Francisco de Miranda and the Revolutionizing of Spanish 
America'. /// Report of the American Historical Association for 1007. 

swii ii Bannister Harding, Ph.D. 

14. Review of William B. Weeden's 'War Government, Federal 
and State, in Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, and Indiana, 
1860-1865'. In American Historical Review, XII, pp. 408-410 (Jan., 
1907). 

LI. 'Select Orations Illustrating American Political History'. 
Selected and edited. Indianapolis, 1908. Pp. XII, 507. 

10. 'Lincoln selections, comprising the first Lincoln-Douglas de- 
hate, first and second inaugurals, Gettysburg address'. Edited, with 
introductions. Indianapolis, 1909. Pp. 50. 

17. 'The Story of England : an elementary history of Eng- 
land, for use in sixth and seventh grades'. Chicago, 1909. Illustra- 
tions and maps. Pp. about 350. (In press.) 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL 
SCIENCE 

Ulysses G. Weatherly, Professor of Economics and Social Science. 
WILLIAM A. Rawles, Professor of Political Economy. 

Undergraduates selecting Economics and Social 
Science as their major subject are required to take nine 
terms of daily work (forty-five hours) in the Department. 
Of the elective work in other Departmets at least three 
terms should be in History and Political Science, and it 
is strongly urged that one course of this work be taken in 
the Freshman year, before the work in Economics is 
begun. 

The courses in the Department fall into two groups, 
adjusted to the needs of those students whose interest lies 
primarily in the field of Economics or of those who wish 
lo work chiefly in Sociology. The graduate work in both 
lines centers in Courses 8 and 8a. The Department Li- 



38 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

brary is equipped with full sets of the most important 
public documents, both state and national, and has com- 
plete sets of most of the American, English, French and 
German economic periodicals. Advanced students have 
direct access to these materials, and also to the special 
collections relating' to charitable and correctional institu- 
tions. The Department is affiliated with the Charity Or- 
ganization Society of Indianapolis, and through this 
means properly qualified students are enabled to come 
into direct contact with the social and economic problems 
of that city. Constant use is also made of the statistical 
materials in the various departments of the State govern- 
ment, and also in the State Library. 

The following courses are designed to furnish the work 
for the Master's Degree. In certain cases a second year 
of graduate study may be taken with advantage. 

(i. Money, Banking, and the Money Market. (1) Fall term: 
Money. General monetary principles and such special sub- 
jects as bimetallism, the standard of deferred payments, and 
the present monetary situation in the United States. (2) 
Winter term: Banking. History and theory of Banking 
and credit operations, followed by a study of the banking 
systems of the leading foreign states, and of the recent pro- 
posals of banking reforms in the United States. (3) Spring 
term : The Money Market. A study of the rates of dis- 
count and exchange (domestic and foreign), the functions of 
bill brokers, international payments, financial panics and 
crises, financial aspects of stock and produce exchanges, and 
London and New York as centers of financial operations. 
Lectures, text-books, and special reports. Professor Kawi.ks. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. T. Tli.. at 8:00, 

:>. Public Finance. A study of the revenues and expenditures of 
the various political units, local, state, and national, and the 
leading features of financial administration, taxation, and 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 39 

public debts. A detailed study will be made of the tax sys- 
tem of Indiana. The financial history of the United States. 
with especial attention to the currency, taxation, and bank- 
ing institutions. Lectures, text-books and collateral readings. 
Professor Rawles. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. M. W. P., at 8:00. 

9. Transportation. An historical survey of the means and meth- 
ods of transportation, followed by a study of the economic 
and social bearings of the present transportation question. 
Professor Rawles. 
Spring term. M. \Y. F.. at 0:00. 

I'd. Ethnology. The origin and antiquity of man; physical charac- 
teristics of race as a hasis of race classification; social and 
psychic characteristics in relation to material civilization; 
race geography. Professor Weatiierly. 
Fall term. T. Th.. at 10:00. 

21. Comparative Sociology: The problem of the family. Historical 
evolution of the family ; types of marriage and of kinship ; 
present status of opinion as to the primitive family ; the di- 
vorce problem, and the economic and social position of woman. 
Professor Weatiierey. 
Winter term, T. Th.. at 10:00. 

23. Demography of the United States. Racial ingredients of the 
national population ; problems of race contact and assimila- 
tion ; special problems connected with immigration and natu- 
ralization : the negro problem ; the movements of population. 
Professor Weatiierey. 
Spring term. T .Th., at 10:00. 

4(i. Social Pathology : Pauperism and charities. A general intro- 
duction to the study of the degenerate classes ; the causes of 
dependence ; a comparative study of modern modes of dealing 
with the defective and dependent classes; charity organiza- 
tion and the most recent developments in preventive philan- 
thropy. Professor Weatiierly. 
Fall term, M. W. F., at 10:00. 



40 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

ih. Social Pathology : ('rime and penology. Nature and causes of 
crime ; an examination of criminal anthropology; the his- 
torical development of penology: the reformatory system, the 
juvenile court and probation system; the leading problems of 
criminal jurisprudence. The class will make a two days' 
visit to the benevolent and penal institutions at. Indianapolis. 
Professor WEATHEKLY. 

Winter term, INI. W. P., at 10:00. 

Open to third and fourth year students in Economics, History. 
Philosophy, and Law. 

lr. Social Pathology : Special problems. In 1908-09 the subject 
of the course will be the liquor problem and social betterment. 
Other topics to be taken up from year to year will be indus- 
trial betterment, and the special questions of municipal so- 
ciology. Professor Weatherly. 
Spring term, M. W. P., at 10 :00. 

10. Socialism and Social Reform. A historical study of Utopian 
social philosophy and of the growth of scientific socialism ; 
the origin and present position of Marxian socialism ; Ameri- 
can communistic experiments and movements for radical so- 
cial reform. Professor Weatherly. 
Pall term, T. Th., at 11 :00. 

10. Industrial Society. An examination of certain recent theories 
of distribution with special reference to their bearing on the 
social aspects of industry; in the study of the questions at 
issue between capital and labor emphasis is laid on the grow- 
ing recognition of society's paramount interest. Professor 
Weatherly. 
Winter term. T. Th., at 11 :00. 

7. General Sociology. A summary of social forces and an attempt 
lo formulate certain principles of social action; a careful 
analysis and criticism is made of those trends of sociological 
speculation which give most promise of being permanently 
fruitful. Professor WEATHERLY. 
Spring term, T. Th., at 11 :00. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 41 

v Seminary in Economics and Sociology. Designed for advanced 
students who have shown the ability to undertake individual 
research. The subjects for investigation may be taken from 
the field of either Economics or Sociology, but it is intended 
that they shall have some degree of unity. Considerable 
attention is given to training in statistical methods. Each 
member is expected to prepare a thesis exhibiting the results 
of original research. Professors Weatherly and Uawi.es. 
Fall. Winter and Spring terms, two hours a week, at an hour 
to be appointed. 

Sa. Research. Special investigations upon economic or sociological 
subjects, directed toward the preparation of theses for the 
Master's degree. Hours and credit by individual arrange- 
ment. 

PUBLICATIONS 15V MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly. 

12. 'Outlines of sociology'. Indianapolis. 1906. Pp. ?>4. 

13. 'Babeuf's place in the history of socialism', In Papers of 
tip' Amor. Econ. Assoc. Third Series, Vol. VIII, No. 1, pp. 113-124. 

14. 'Training for social workers'. In Indiana Bull, of Char, 
and Corr. June. 1907. pp. ITS-ISO. 

15. 'The juvenile delinquent'. In The Teachers' Journal, No- 
vember. 1007. pp. 261-200. 

10. Review of Karl Lamprecht's 'Deutsche Geschichte, siebenter 
Band, erste Haelfte'. In Amor. Hist. Rev. NI, pp. 653-654. (April, 
1906.) 

17. Review of Karl Lamprecht's 'Deutsche Geschichte, neunter 
Band'. In Amer. Hist. Rev. XIII. pp. 351-353. (Jan., 1908.) 

18. Review of Karl Lamprecht's 'Deutsche Geschichte, zehnter 
Band'. In Amer. Hist. Rev. XIII. pp. 872-874. (July, 1908.) 

10. Review of William B. Guthrie's 'Socialism before the French 
revolution: a history'. In Amer. Hist. Rev. XIII, pp. .'540-347. 
(Jan.. 100S.) 

20. Review of William Graham Sumner's 'Folkways: a study of 
the sociological importance of usages, manners, customs, mores, and 
morals*. /;/ Econ. Bull. I. pp. 58-60. (April, 1908.) 



42 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

21. Review of Lewis II. Morgan's 'Ancient society". /;/ Econ. 
Bull. I, i>i). 65-66. (April. 1008.) 

22. Review of William I. Thomas's 'Sex and society". In Econ. 
Bull. I. 155-157. (June. 1908.) 

23. Review of Hntton Webster's 'Primitive secret societies'. In 
Econ. Bull. I, pp. 151-154. (June. 1908.) 

24. Review of Jerome Dowd's 'The negro races: a sociological 
study. Vol. I'. In Econ. Bull. I. pp. 234-235. (Sept.. 1908.) 

25. Review of Maurice Parmelee's 'The principles of anthro- 
pology and sociology in their relations to criminal procedure", hi 
Econ. Bull. I, pp. 344-345. (Dec.. 1908.) 

26. 'Race friction between blacks and whites in the United 
States'. In Amer. Jour. Sociol. XIII. pp. 823-825. (May. Pans. » 

27. The same, in Pub. Amer. Sociol. Soc, Vol. II. pp. 93-95. 
2S. 'How does the access of women to industrial occupations 

react on the family'? In Pub. Amer. Sociol. Soc. Vol. III. pp. 124- 
130. 

29. Review of Alfred Holt Stone's 'Studies in the American race 
Problem". In Econ. Bull. II. 60-62. (April, 1909.) 

30. Review of W. E. Burghardt I hi Bois' 'Economic co-operation 
among negro Americans'. In Econ. Bull. II. 62-64. (April. 1909.) 

31. Joint editor of the Economic Bulletin, in charge of the de- 
partment of Anthropology and Ethnography. 

32. Advising editor of the American Journal of Sociology. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Ernest II. LlNDLEY, Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 
Warner Eitk, Professor of Philosophy. 
WILLIAM L. Bryan. Lecturer on Ethics. 

— , Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

For students who lake their major subject in this De- 
partment, the required work consists of Courses 1, -. •'}, 
27, 4//. and Course 5 of the Department of Anatomy. Stu- 
dents desiring to give their chief attention to general 
philosophy may substitute Course 6a or ()h for Anatomy 5. 

The psychological Laboratory occupies four Large and 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 43 

twelve small rooms, of special construction, in Science 
Ball. Among those designed for special uses are a Large 
dark-room for experiments on vision, equipped with large 
iris-diaphragm, arc-light, and heliostat attachments; a 
sound-proof room for the study of minimal auditory sen- 
sations; three small double rooms providing convenient 
isolation of subjects during experiments on reaction-time, 
circulation, etc. The laboratory is supplied throughout 
with water, gas, and electric light and power, and has ap- 
paratus for both practice and research courses. Besides 
the usual outfit for the study of sensation and perception, 
such as is required by Sanford's 'Manual', the laboratory 
is equipped with the following- generally useful or special 
pieces: (1) For reaction-time experiments: the Hipp 
chronoscope, and ten pendulum chronoscopes,* together 
with the necessary electric keys, commutators, drop ma- 
chines, sound keys, etc. ; also two clocks* for giving va- 
rious intervals in experiments by the continuous method. 
(2) For graphic work : the Marey and the Ludwig kymo- 
graphs, a continuous paper kymograph, two simple 
spring-kymographs, an electric fork, the Kreonecker in- 
terrupter, the Jacques interval watch, together with the 
necessary receiving, transmitting, and writing apparatus : 
the Mosso plethysmograph, a pneumograph, the Verdin 
radial and carotid sphygmographs, the Runne sphygmo- 
graph, and a constant electric motor. (3) For the study 
of movement : myographs, a tapping machine, * and a 
general ergograph.* (4) For memory and association : a 
compound interrupter,* with drum and escapement, for 
experiments according to the Ebbinghaus method, to- 
gether with the necessary syllable series, etc., and a large 
set of interference cards. (5) Miscellaneous : apparatus 

♦Designed and made in the Department. 



44 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

for testing the competitive instinct;* instrument for test- 
ing' the force and direction of movement simultaneously.* 
(6) An aviary, an incubator and brooder, quarters for 
small animals, artificial nests for ants, etc., and other fa- 
cilities for the study of comparative psychology. 

The workshop of the psychological Laboratory is 
equipped with two photographic dark-rooms, an electric 
motor, a Reed lathe with screw- cutting and gear-cutting 
attachments, and the necessary tools for work in wood 
and metal ; it is used both for repairing old and for con- 
structing new apparatus. 

In addition to the apparatus in experimental psychol- 
ogy, the Department possesses a laboratory for the study 
of neurology. This includes a large number of charts, a 
series of models of the nervous system, including Auzoux 
models of brain, eye, and ear ; Ziegler models of the em- 
bryology of the human brain ; a series of human and ani- 
mal brains ; dissecting outfits ; microtomes, microscopes, 
and other appliances necessary to the study of the struc- 
ture and functions of the nervous system. 

The following are the graduate courses of the Depart- 
ment. 
.'>.". Modern Idealism. An advanced study of metaphysics, based 
upon Royce's 'The World and the Individual' as a text. Pro- 
fessor Fite. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 
Open to students who have taken Courses 1, -, and o, or their 
equivalent. 

.'50. Seminary in Philosophy. A course designed to aid advanced 
students in the investigation of philosophical problems. The 
subjeel for 1908-09 will be problems of contemporary phi- 
losophy. Professor LlNDLEY. 
Fall, Winter. ;iimI Spring terms, two hours a week. 

Open to siudents who have had sullieieni preparation. 



"Designed and made in the Department. 



GBADUATE SCHOOL 45 

8. Psychological Research. Work arranged with individual stu- 
dents. Professor Li.nki.ky. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours lo be arranged. 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

EBNES1 II li: \ M LlNDLEY. 

11. Review of Judd's 'Psychology: General Introduction and 
Laboratory Manual'. Journal Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific 
Methods. IV. 26. 

li*. 'Relations of Ethics to Philosophy and Psychology'. Proc. 
Am. Psych. Assn., 1907-OS. Psych. Review, V. 

John P. Porter. 

'A preliminary study of the English sparrow'. Contributions 
from the Psychological laboratory of Indiana L T niversity. Am. .Tour. 
Psych. XV. 

F. O. Beck. 

'Prayer: A study in its History and Psychology'. Am. Jour. Re- 
ligious Psychology and Education II. 

War nek Fite. 

1. 'The priority of inner experience'. In Philos. Rev. IV, pp. 
120-142. (March, 1895.) 

2. Review of Rehmke's 'Lehrbuch der allgemeinen Psychologie'. 
In Philos. Rev. V, pp. 412-417. (July, 1S96.) 

3. 'Professor Patten's psychological doctrines'. (A criticism of 
Simon X. Patten's 'Development of English Thought.) In Jour. Pal. 
Econ. Ill, pp. 384-391. (June, 1899.) 

4. 'The Associational conception of experience'. In Philos. 
Rev.. IX, pp. 168-292. (May, 1900.) 

.">. 'Contiguity and Similarity'. In Philos. Rev., IX, pp. G13- 
629. (November, 1900.) 

G. (Art, Industry and Science: a suggestion toward a pyscho- 
logical theory of art.) In Psy. Rev., VIII, pp. 128-144. (March, 
1901.) 

7. 'The monaural localization of sound'. (Joint author with J. 
R. Angell.) In Psy. Rev., VIII, pp. 225-24G. (May, 1901.) 

8. 'Further observations on the monaural localization of sound'. 
(Joint author with J. R. Angell.) In Psy. Rev., VIII, pp. 449, 458. 
(September, 1901.) 



4f) INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

J). 'An introductory study of ethics". New York and London, 
1903. Pp. xi. :iT4. 

10. 'The Place of Pleasure and Pain in the functional psycho- 
logy'. In Psy. Rev.. X. pp. 633-644. (November, 11)03.) 

11. 'Herbert Spencer as a philosopher. /// Jour. Philos., Psy.. 
and Sci. Meth., I, pp. 288-293. (May. 1904.) 

12. 'The logic of the color-element theory'. /// Psy. Bull. I. 
455-464. (December, 1904.) 

1*3. 'The experience-philosophy'. In Philos. Rev.. XV. pp. 1-1 0. 
(January, 1900.) 

14. 'The exaggeration of the social". In Jour. Philos.. Psy.. and 
Sci. Meth.. IV. pp. 393-390. July, 1907.) 

15. 'The theory of democracy'. In Int. Jour. Ethics. XVIII. 
pp. 1-18. (October. 1907.) 

10. 'The agent and the observer". /// Philos. Rev., XVII. pp. 
489-506. (September. 1908.) 

17. Review of Jonas Cohn's 'Die Voraussetzungen und Ziele des 
Erkennens". In Philos. Rev.. XVIII. (May. 1000.) In press. 

18. Nineteen other reviews of books in Philos. Rev.. Psy. Rev. 
and Am. Jonr. Theol. 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

Alfred M. Brooks. Professor. 
Robert E. Burke. Instructor. 

This Department is well equipped for graduate work. 
In addition to its collections of photographs, casts, and 
other reproductions of works of art, it possesses many en- 
gravings, and some valuable drawings by old and modern 
masters. These collections are being increased constantly, 
as are the books upon Fine Arts in the Library. 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Alfred Mansfield Brooks. A.M. 

1. 'Architecture: Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Romanesque, and 
Gothic'. Chicago, L898. 

2. 'The Newell Fortune'. London, 1000. 
:',. 'Somes House', Loudon, 1000. 



GRADUATE school 47 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Schuyler C. Davisson, Professor. 
David A. Rothbock, Professor. 

I'i.yssi.s s. Banna, Associate Professor. 

The graduate courses at present offered in the Depart- 
ment require about three years for their completion. 

The Library of the Department of Mathematics, con- 
sisting of about 2,000 bound volumes, is located in Room 
36, Wylie Hall. The Library is open from 8:00 a.m. to 
10:00 p.m. for use by students pursuing advanced work in 
mathematics. The collection of mathematical books con- 
sists of the more important English, French, and German 
texts, the collected works of Abel, Bernoulli, Cauchy, Cay- 
lev. Clifford, DeMorgan, Gauss. Jacobi, Lagrange, Lie, 
Mobius, Riemann, Schwartz, Smith, Steiner, and Weier- 
strass. together with the following sets of periodicals: 

Acta Mathematics. Stockholm, Berlin, Paris. 1882 to date. 

American Journal of Mathematics. Baltimore. 1878 to date. 

American Mathematical Monthly. Springfield, Mo. 1S<)4 to date. 

Analyst (The). I )es Moines. la. 1874-1883. Complete. 

Annals of Mathematics. Charlottesville. Va.. and Cambridge, Mass. 
1884 to date. 

Annates scientifiques de 1'Ecole Normale Superieur. Paris. (Cur- 
rent numbers.) 

Archiv fur Mathematik und Physik. Leipzig. 1S41 to date. 

Bulletin de la Societe Mathematique de France. Paris. 1873 to date. 

Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society. New York. 1894 
to date. 

Bulletin of the New York Mathematical Society. New York. 1891- 
1894. Complete. 

Cambridge Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 1837-1845. Com- 
plete. 

Cambridge and Dublin Mathematical Journal. Cambridge, 1S4C»- 
1854. Complete. 



48 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Educational Times (Mathematical Reprints from the). London. 

1863 to date. 
Giornale di Matematiche. Naples. (Current numbers.) 
Jahresbericht der deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung. Leipzig. 

1890 to date. 
Jahrbuch iiber die Fortschritte der Mathematik. Berlin. 1869 to 

date. 
Journal de l'Ecole Polytechnique. Paris. (Current numbers.) 
.Journal de Mathomatiques pures et appliques (Lionville). Paris. 

1836 to date. 
Journal fur die reine und angewandte Mathematik (Crelle). Berlin. 

1826 to date. 
L'Enseignement Mathematique. Paris. (Current numbers.) 
Mathematical Monthly (The). Cambridge, Mass. 1859-1861. Com- 
plete. 
Mathematical Magazine. Washington. 1882-1884. 
Mathematical Gazette. London. 1901 to date. 
Mathematical Messenger (The). 1887-1894. Complete. 
Mathematical Review. Worcester. 1896-1897. Complete. 
Mathematical Visitor. 1877-1883. Complete. 
Mathematische Annalen. Leipzig. 1869 to date. 
Mathesis. Ghent. 1881 to date. 
Messenger of Mathematics (The Oxford. Cambridge and Dublin). 

Cambridge. 1862-1871. Complete. 
Messenger of Mathematics (The). London and Cambridge. 1X72 to 

date. 
Monatshefte fur Mathematik und Physik. Vienna. (Current 

numbers.) 
Nachrichten von der Koniglischen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften 

zu Gbttingen. Gottingen. 1N ( .>!) to date. 
Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society. Edinburgh. 

L883 to date. 
Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society. London. 1865 

to date. 
Quarterly Journal of Mathematics, Pure and Applied. London. 

1857 to date. 
Rendiconti del Circolo Matematico di Palermo. Palermo. L884 

to date. 



GRADE \ 11: school 49 

Revue Semestrielle des Publications MathGmatiques. Amsterdam. 

1803 to date. 
Transactions <>f the American Mathematical Society. New York. 

1900 to date. 

In addition to the above list of periodicals and com- 
plete sets belonging to the .Mathematical library, the gen- 
eral University library receives a number of periodicals 
partly devoted to mathematics. Among' these may be 
mentioned the following: 'Les Comptes Rendns de 
L'Aead&nie des Sciences', 'The Philosophical Magazine', 
"The Transactions of the Royal Society'. 

The following courses for graduate students will be 
given at hours to be arranged: 

20. Mathematical Heading- and Research. Professors Davisnon. 

and Rothbock, Associate Professor IIanna. 

30. Theory of Surfaces. Lectures and reports upon the general 
theory of surfaces and twisted curves. Singularities of sur- 
faces, asymptotic curves, lines of curvature, geodesic lines. 
Differential geometry. Six hours' credit. Professor Davis- 
son. 
1009-1910, M. W. F. 

21. Functions of a Complex Variable. The fundamental opera- 

tions, conformal representation, stereographic projection and 
mapping upon the Riemann sphere, series developments, 
Cauchy's and related theorems, many-valued functions, Rie- 
mann surfaces. Lectures and reports. Professor Rotii- 
BOCK. 

Fall and Winter terms, 1909-10, six hours, and Spring and 
Summer, 1911. six hours. 

Prerequisite. Mathematics 10, 13. 

24. Functions of Real Variables. An introduction to the theory 
of functions of real variables. Assemblages, limits, deriva- 
tives, definite integrals. Professor Rothkock. 

Spring and Summer terms, 1910, six hours. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 10. 13, 21. 

[4] 



50 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

l.~>. Modern Analytical Geometry. A study of point and line co- 
ordinates, duality, anharmonic ratios, nature of co-ordinate 
systems, circular points, and the line at infinity. Lectures. 
assigned reading, and exercises. Four hours' credit. Pro- 
fessor Davisson. 
Summer, 1010. 

38. Fourier's Series and Fourier's Integrals. A study of the more 
important partial differential equations of mathematical 
physics, the development of functions into sine and cosine 
series. Fourier's series and Fourier's integrals, and appli- 
cations of the latter two in the solution of problems in 
physics. Four hours' credit. Professor Davisson. 
Fall and Winter. T. Th., 1910-1911. 

•19. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics. A course dealing with 
the foundations of mathematics. Lectures and reports. 
Professor Davisson. 
Spring, 1911, T. Th. 

50. Systems of Geometry. An introductory course presenting the 
fundamental principles of the more important systems of 
geometry. Professor EtOTHROCK. 
Fall and Winter terms. 1910-1911, six hours. 

4."). Calculus of Variations. Professor Uotiirock. 
Spring and Summer terms, 1911. six hours. 

32. Theory of Numbers. Linear congruences, proofs of the law 
of quadratic reciprocity, the analytic and geometric theories 
of forms, etc. Associate Professor IIanna. 
Summer term. 1909, five hours' credit : Fall term. 1910. three 
hours' credit. 

'.V.\. Invariants and Covariants. Fundamental processes for form- 
ing invariants; binary forms of the second, third, fourth and 



39, 



higher orders ; applicath 


his to curves. Associate Pi 


ofessor 


IIanna. 






Fall. Winter, and Spring tc 


nns, 1909-1910, six hours' c 


•edit. 


Theory of Groups of Sid 


istitutions. An elementary 


course 


dealing with the fund 


imental theorems preparat 


try to 


Course lo. Associate I' 


•ofessor IIanna. 




Winter term, loio-l 1. three 


hours' credit. ( Follow ( Joui 


se 32. ) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 51 

10. The (ialois Theory of Equations. A continuation of Course 
.">'.>. hoili courses based on Bianchi's 'Lezioni sulla Teoria <l«'i 
Gruppi di Sostituzioni'. Associate Professor Hanna. 
Spring term, 1910-11, three hours' credit. 

17. Vector Analysis. A study of Hi* 1 algebraic, differential and 
integral properties of vectors. Special emphasis will he laid 
on the physical interpretation and application of vectors. 
Mr. Williams. 
Three hours. Summer and Fall terms, 1909. 

33. Partial Differential Equations. This course deals with various 
types of partial differential equations that occur in theoretical 
physics. Mr. WILLIAMS. 
Six hours. Winter and Spring terms. 11)10. 

51. Integral Equations. A treatment of the Fredholm Integral 
Equation with its various applications. 
Six hours. Fall and Winter terms. 1910 and 1911. 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Sen i yllk Colfax Davisson. 

2. Review of Halsted's 'Rational Geometry'. In Bulletin Ameri- 
can Mathematical Society. 

.".. 'College Algebra'. /// press of Macmillan Company. 

David Andrew Rothrock. 

5. 'Supplementary Prohlems to Essentials of Algebra'. (Joint 
author with R. J. Aley.) New York, 1906, pp. 1-68. 

(J. 'Lectures on Functions of a Complex Yariahle*. Part I. 
Lithographed edition by H. Kiihler, Munich. 1904. 

7. 'Concerning Differential Invariants'. [>i Proc. Indiana Acad. 
Sci. 1906, pp. 85-94. 

v 'Plane and Spherical Trigonometry'. To appear 1909 from 
press of Macmillan Co., N. Y. 

Clyssks Sherman Hanna. 

1. 'The Bitangential of the Quintic'. In Proc. Indiana Acad. 
Sci. for 1001. 

2. 'Irrelevant Factors in Bitangentials of Plane Algebraic 
Curves'. In Proc. Indiana Acad. Sci. for 1904. 



52 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

3. 'The Equations of Bitangential Curves of the General Plane 
Quintic and Sextic Curves'. In 'Rendiconti del Circolo Matematico 
di Palermo'. 1909. 

Charles Haseman. 

1. 'Anwendung der Theorie der Integralgleichungen auf einige 
Randwertaufgaben in der Funktionentheorie'. Dissertation, Gottin- 
gen, 1907. 

2. 'Integralgleichungen und Funktionentheorie'. Mathematische 
Annalen, Vol. 66, 1908, p. 258. 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICS AND 
ASTRONOMY 

Wilbur A. Cogshall, Associate Professor of Astronomy. 
*Vernon A. Suydam, Instructor in Mechanics. 

Kirkwood Observatory, completed in 1900, is occupied 
by the Department. The building contains a library and 
computing room ; a lecture room ; darkroom; a transit 
room, in which is a Bamberg universal instrument, a How- 
ard sideral clock, a mean time chronometer, and a chrono- 
graph ; a dome twenty-six feet in diameter ; and a room 
of the same size immediately below. In the dome is the 
refracting telescope, of which the 12-inch objective is by 
Brashear, and the mounting by Warner and Swasey, of 
Cleveland. The instrument has a focal length of about 15 
feet, and is supplied with eyepieces magnifying from 130 
to nearly 1,000 diameters ; also with polarizing helioscope, 
diagonal eyepiece, and an electrically illuminated micro- 
meter; there are both coarse and fine circles in right as- 
cension arid declination, the fine circles having reading 
microscope and electrical illumination. 

The Department has in a separate building, a mount- 
ing, designed and built by the Department, Unit carries 



> Absent on leave, L909-10. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 53 

a 4-inch Browning refractor, a 5-inch portrait lens and an 
8-inch parabolic mirror, for the photography of comets, 
nebulae, etc. 

Another building contains a ccelostat and horizontal 
telescope. The objective of the telescope has a diameter 
of 9 inches and a focal Length of 64 feet. Both the plane 
of the ccelostal and the lens are by Petitdidier, of Chicago. 

The Lawrence Fellowship of the Department of Me- 
chanics and Astronomy of Indiana University has been 
established by Mr. Percival Lowell, of the Lowell Observa- 
tory, upon 1 be following terms and conditions: 

1. The Fellowship shall be known as the Lawrence Fellowship, 
in remembrance of the donor's motherland is established in per- 
petuity, revocable, however, at any time at the will of the founder. 

2. It shall be annually available and shall cover the college cal- 
endar year, that is from commencement to commencement of the same. 

3. The applicant shall be appointed by the Department, the 
donor reserving the right of final passing upon the suitability of the 
candidate so presented. 

4. (A) The Fellow shall be given time and opportunity for an 
original thesis on some astronomical subject looking to the taking of 
a Master's degree, the nature of which shall be decided by the Di- 
rector and the Fellow. (B) But the Fellow shall be expected to give 
general assistance in the observatory's work during the period of his 
Fellowship. 

•"». The Fellowship shall pay $000 and the Fellow's traveling ex- 
penses to and from the Observatory at Flagstaff, Ariz. ; and a fur- 
nished room at the Observatory shall be free to the Fellow's use. 

The Department receives telegraphic bulletins of dis- 
coveries made at American and European observatories. 

12. Theoretical Astronomy. Integration of equations of motion ; 

computation of orbits and ephemerides. Associate Professor 

Cog shall. 
Fall term. Hours and credit to be arranged with each student. 
Open to students who have passed in Mathematics 7. 



54 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

13. Research. A limited number of students will be permitted to 

undertake research work under the supervision of the De- 
partment. The equipment is best suited for work in astron- 
omy of precision and celestial photography. Associate Pro- 
fessor COGSHALL. 
Fall. Winter and Spring terms. Hours and credit arranged 
with each student. 

14. Orbits of Spectroscopic Binaries. A discussion of the methods 

of Rambault. Lehmann-Filhes, and others for the determina- 
tion of these orbits. Associate Professor COGSHALL. 
Winter term. T. Th., at 2 :()(). 

15. Celestial Mechanics. An introductory course. Associate Pro- 

fessor COGSHALL. 
Spring term. M. W. F., at 11 :00. 
Open to students who have passed in Course 7. 

8. Theoretical Mechanics. Lectures and recitation from text-book. 
Geometry of motion; linear, plane and solid kinematics; 
kinetics of a particle and of free and rigid bodies ; motion of 

a variable system. Mr. . 

Fall and Winter terms. M. W. F., at 9:00. 
Zeiwet. 'Theoretical Mechanics'. 

8a. Rigid Dynamics. A course intended for students who have 
completed Mechanics 7 and 8. Discussion of laws of motion, 
work and energy, oscillations and cyclic motions, dynamics 
of rigid and deformable bodies, hydrodynamics. Mr. . 

Fall term. T. Th.. at hours to be arranged. 

Webster. 'The Dynamics of Particles and of Rigid, Elastic and 
Fluid Bodies'. 

Open to Seniors and graduates who have passed in Mathematics 
11, 10, and 13. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 55 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 
Arthur L. Foley, Professor of Physics. 

Uoi.I.A R. RAMSEY, Associate Professor of Physics. 

The Department offers a full course leading to the de- 
cree of Ph.D. 

The Department is located in Science Hall. The lower 
half of this building was planned to meet the special needs 
of the Department, and it embodies the most advanced 
ideas in physical laboratory construction. The location of 
the building insures freedom from vibration; the con- 
struction is massive and thoroughly fireproof. On the 
basement floor there are a constant temperature room, a 
large dynamo laboratory, a manual training laboratory, a 
drawing room, two research laboratories and two store- 
rooms. The first floor is occupied by the office of the De- 
partment, the departmental library, a shop room, an ap- 
paratus room, an advanced electrical laboratory, two pho- 
tometric laboratories, a spectroscopic and photographic 
laboratory, a standardizing laboratory, a chemical and 
battery room, a laboratory for advanced work in heat, 
two research laboratories, five developing rooms, and the 
elementary laboratories. The latter comprise five rooms 
— a large room devoted to general practice, and four small 
rooms for work in sound and light. The south wing of 
the second floor contains the lecture room, an apparatus 
and preparation room, and a class room. The lecture 
room has an elevated floor and is seated with tablet-arm 
opera chairs. It is provided with automatic blinds, 
screens, and boards, all under the immediate control of 
the lecturer. The lecture table is built in three sections, 
and the plumbing and wiring are arranged so that one, 
two. or three sections may be used at a time. At the table 



56 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

the lecturer has battery and dynamo currents (direct and 
alternating, — one, two, and three phase), dial rheostats, 
voltmeters, ammeters, electric motors, calcium and elec- 
tric lanterns, projectoscope, low and high resistance pro- 
jecting galvanometers, water, gas, compressed air, exhaust 
cocks, etc. All the laboratories are supplied with water, 
gas, and electricity. The basement floors are of concrete. 
There are fifteen large masonry piers and more than three 
hundred lineal feet of six-inch stone wall shelves. The 
chemical and battery room has a fume hood and a cement 
floor. All the developing rooms have both gas and elec- 
tric ruby lights, tile shelves, and lockers. Thirteen rooms 
are provided with blinds for making them light tight. 
The smaller shop room contains a cabinet-maker's bench, 
a wood trimmer, two screw-cutting lathes, a shape r, a 
grinder, and wood and metal working tools. This shop 
is for the repair and construction of physical apparatus. 
The larger shop is equipped with cabinet-maker's benches, 
power saws, grinders, wood and metal working lathes, 
forges, and the tools required for the shop work outlined 
under (V)urses 17, 27, 28, and 29. The dynamo room in 
Science Hall is equipped with generators and motors of 
eight different types, selected to illustrate the essential 
features of early ;is well as modern practice. The gener- 
ators are belted to ;i line shaft driven by a Lincoln va- 
riable speed motor with speed range of one to five. A 
traveling crane permits the lifting of any machine in posi- 
tion to be connected by <\ torsion dynamometer to any 
other machine, and the machines studied both as gener- 
ators and motors. All the machines are of special con- 
struction, the field and armature windings being divided 
into sections and the terminals brought to separate posts. 



GKADUATE SCHOOL 57 

thus permitting the study of the performance of the ma- 
chines under widely different conditions. Direct current 
may be had of any voltage up to eighl hundred, and alter- 
nating current (one, two, or three phase), of any Ere 
quency from ten to three hundred, and of any voltage 
(without transformers) up to six hundred. The voltage 
range is still further increased by transformers of various 
sizes having both primary and secondary coils in three 
sections with separate terminals for each section. A 
large dynamo laboratory is provided in a separate build- 
ing. It is equipped with three single engines, one of ten, 
one of forty, and one of one hundred fifty horsepower, one 
compound engine of one hundred twenty-five horsepower, 
and four generators, respectively of twenty, twenty, 
eighty, and one hundred kilowatts capacity. The labora- 
tory is well equipped with voltmeters, ammeters, watt- 
meters, dynamometers, rheostats, and other instruments 
for heavy currents; also with delicate instruments for 
exact measurements. 

The supply of apparatus for the presentation of 
courses in modern experimental physics is fairly com- 
plete. The equipment and facilities for work have been 
largely increased during the past three years, especially in 
the way of delicate instruments and accurate standards 
for advanced study. 

The Library of the Department of Physics contains 
about six hundred volumes, exclusive of sets of several 
journals. The following magazines are on file : 'Annalen 
der Physik', 'Annales de Chemie et de Physique', 'Bei- 
blatter zu den Annalen der Physik', 'Physikalische Zeit- 
schrift', ''The Electrical World and Engineer', 'The Elec- 
trician' (London), 'Journal de Physique', 'The Philosoph- 



58 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

ical Magazine', 'The Physical Review', 'The Proceedings 
of the Physical Society of London', 'The Proceedings of 
the Royal Society', 'Le Radium', 'School Science and 
Mathematics', 'Science Abstracts' (A and B), 'Scientific 
American and Supplement', 'The Western Electrician', 
' Gassier 's Magazine', and 'The Manual Training Maga- 
zine'. Students have access also to the journals on file 
in the general library, and in the libraries of other De- 
partments. Of these may be named: 'The American 
Journal of Science', 'The Astrophysical Journal', 'The 
Engineering and Mining Journal', 'The Engineering 
Magazine', 'Nature', 'Comptes Rendus', and 'Science'. 
112. The Electromagnetic Theory of Light. Assistant Professor 



Fall, Winter and Spring terms, T. Th., at !) :00. 
Drude, 'Theory of Optics'. 

13. Advanced Mathematical Electricity. Associate Professor Ram- 

sey. 
Fall, Winter and Spring terms. T. Th.. at S :00. 
Webster, 'Electricity and Magnetism'. 

.">.'>. Spectroscopy, with special attention to emission, reflection and 
absorption in the infra-red. Lectures and laboratory prac- 
tice. . 

Fall, Winter and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

L66. Laboratory Practice in Spectroscopy and Photometry. Pro- 
fessor Foley. 
Fall, Winter and Spring terms, T. Th., at '2 :()(). 

14. Advanced Laboratory Methods and Research. Professor Foley. 
Pall, Winter and Spring terms, daily, at 1 :00. 

22. Current Physical Literature. Professor FOLEY. 
Two hours per week at an hour to be appointed. 

30. Advanced Theoretical Physics. Professor FOLEY. 
Two hours per week :it ;i time to be appointed. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 59 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Akihi i; Lee Foley. 

23. 'The Subject Matter of High School Physics'. In The 
Teachers' Journal, IV. pp. 4-1). (July. 11)04.) Also in Proc. Nat. 
Ed. Assn.. 1904, pp. 865-870. 

26. 'Interference Fringes about the Path of an Electric 1 )is- 
charge'. (Joint author with J. II. Haseman.) Proc. Ind. Acad. 
S.i. for l!l()4. i). 206. 

27. 'Electromagnetic Induction in Conductors of Different Ma- 
terials and in Electrolytes'. (Joint author with G. A. Evans.) 
Proc. Ind. Acad. Sci. for 1904, i>i>. 203-20.1. 

20. 'Diffraction Fringes from Electric Discharges and from Fluid 
Streams-. Abstract. Phys. Rev., XX. pp. 300-400 (June, 1005). 

30. 'Physical Science in 1001'. Indianapolis News. Dee. 30. 
1905, 3 columns. 

31. 'Note oij the Molecular Forces in Gelatine 1 . Science XXIII, 
pp. 700-701. (May IS. 1906. ) 

32. 'A Simple Method of Determining the Absolute Dilatation 
of Mercury'. Sen. Sci. and Math.. VI. pp. 508-001. (Oct., 1000.) 

Koi.i.a Rot Ramsey. 

0. 'On the Use of Manganese Dioxide in the Generation of 
Oxygen from Potassium Chlorate'. (Joint author with A. L. Foley.) 
Proc. Ind. Acad, of Science, 1003. 

7. 'An Investigation of N-Rays'. (Joint author with W. I*. 
Haseman.) Proc. Ind. Acad. Sci.. 1004. pp. 255-274, 15 plates. 

8. 'The Radium Clock'. Proc. Ind. Acad. Sci., 1005, p. 40. 

0. 'A Simple Method of Measuring Electrolytic Resistance". 
Proc. Ind. Acad. Sci.. 1005. pp. 11 5-1 1(5. 2 plates. 

10. 'Some Peculiarities of Electric Sparks Across Short Spark 
(Japs*. Proc. Ind. Acad. Sci.. 1905, p. 117. 

11. 'Gas Burners and Standards of Candle Power'. (Joint 
author with Iliromitsu ()i.) Proc. Ind. Acad. Sci.. 1005. pp. 110-121, 
2 plates. 

12. 'Polarization of Standard Cells'. Phys. Rev., 21, pp. 56-5S, 
2 plates. ( 1005.) 



60 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Reuben E. Nyswander. 

3'. 'The Absorption and Reflection of Calcite and Aragonite for 
Infra-Red Rays as Dependent upon the Plane of Polarization'. /// 
Phys. Rev., XXVI, pp. 539-540. 1908. 

4. 'The Absorption and Reflection of Calcite and Aragonite for 
Infra-Red Rays as Dependent upon the Plane of Polarization'. In 
Phys. Rev., XXVIII, pp. 291-308. 1909. 

5. 'The Distribution of Energy in the Spectrum of the Tung- 
sten Filament'. In Phys. Rev., XXVIII, pp. 438-445. 1909. 

6. 'The Absorption and Reflection Spectra of Topaz as De- 
pendent upon the Plane of Polarization'. In Phys. Rev., XXIX, in 
press. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

Edgar R. Cumings, Professor. 
Joshua W. Beede, Associate Professor. 

Candidates for graduation in this Department are re- 
quired to complete forty-five hours of work in Geology, 
and in addition Zoology 1, Astronomy 1, and Chemistry 1. 
A certain portion of the work in Geology may represent 
investigation of some problem in the field. An opportu- 
nity is given the student to carry on such work during 
the summer vacation. The Department also offers 
courses leading to the Ph.D. degree. 

The Department is provided with the following labora- 
tories: (1) A geological laboratory and lecture room, 
used for genera] geology, and geography; (2) a mineral- 
ogical laboratory, which will accommodate twenty stu- 
dents; (3) an elementary paleontological laboratory, 
which will accommodate about six students; (4) two re- 
search laboratories; (5) a Large museum room devoted 
to the study and installation of collections. 

In the course in Mineralogy each student is provided 
with all the necessary apparatus for the determination of 



GRADUATE SCHOOL P)l 

the common ores and rock-making minerals. The collec- 
tions used in the course in elementary Mineralogy include 
about two hundred and twenty-five species. The crystal - 
Lographic collections contain about two hundred and fifty 
wooden and plaster models, and a carefully selected col- 
lection of minerals illustrating characteristic crystal 
forms. 

The facilities for geographical study have been much 
enlarged by the addition to the laboratory equipment of 
a large series of maps, charts, lantern slides, models, etc. 
The map collections furnish part of the necessary material 
for advanced geographical courses. 

The Department is in possession of an extensive collec- 
tion of fossils, including a type collection of invertebrates 
arranged in biological sequence, and a historical collec- 
tion representing the characteristic life forms of the sev- 
eral geological epochs, as well as very large collections 
representing the Indiana formations. The latter include 
much unworked material, especially rich in the young 
stages of Brachiopoda and Bryozoa, which could serve as 
the basis of investigations in paleontological lines. The 
Department also possesses about 3,000 thin sections of 
fossils, mostly Bryozoa ; and has all the facilities — rock 
slicer, grinding plates, etc. — for making sections. 

The work of the Department for the Summer term 
consists in a detailed study of the field relations of some 
one of the geological formations of Indiana. For the pres- 
en1 the Ordovician or Mississippian will be made the ob- 
ject of investigation. This work involves the determina- 
tion of the a real, topographical and stratigraphical rela- 
tions of the formation and its subdivisions, together with 
the collection of fossils and the accurate delimitation of 
fauna! zones. Students electing this work must have 



62 INDIANA TNIVKHSITY 

completed Course 1. Credit will be given for the work in 
proportion to the actual time spent in the field. 

Work of this sort, but more advanced in character, 
may also be pursued by students who are candidates for 
an advanced degree. The State of Indiana affords many 
geological and geographical problems suited to form the 
basis of a thesis for the doctor's degree. 

The Department receives the following periodicals: 
'Geological Magazine', 'Quarterly Journal of the Geo- 
logical Society of London', 'Zeitschrift der deutschen 
geologischen Gesellschaft', 'Neues Jahrbuch fiir Geologie 
Mineralogie und Paleontologie', ' Geologisches Central- 
blatt', 'Geographische Zeitschrift', 'Bulletin de la So- 
ciety Geologique de France', 'Annales de Geographie', 
'Journal of the American Geographical Society', 'Annales 
de Paleontologie', 'Engineering and Mining Journal', 
'School of Mines Quarterly', 'Journal of Geology', 'Eco- 
nomic Geology', 'Transactions of the St. Louis Academy 
of Science', 'Journal of the Cincinnati Society of Natural 
History', 'Bulletins of the Geological Society of America', 
'Bulletin of the Geological Department of the University 
of California', 'Monthly Weather Review.' 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES 

.'{. Economic Geology. Lectures, laboratory and field work on the 
geological relations, geographical distribution, and uses of 
the more common building stones, clays, cements, coals, oil 
and gas, and ores. Fully illustrated by lantern slides. The 
preparation of reports on assigned topics is required. As- 
sociate Professor BEEDE. 
Winter term, daily, ai li :00. 
This course may also be elected by Seniors in Geology or 

Chemistry. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 63 

."». Systematic Paleontology. Training in the systematic study of 
fossils is given by means of careful determination in the 
laboratory of typical groups of Paleozoic invertebrates. Pro- 
fessor CUMINQS and Associate Professor BEEDE. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two to five hours, at times to 
l>e arranged. 

Open to students who have passed in Zoology 1. and Geology 1. 

5<i. Evolution. Study of the principles of organic evolution as 
illustrated by fossil organism. Professor Cumings. 
Winter term, at an hour to he arranged. 
Open to graduate students only. 

10. Research. Investigation of geological and paleontological prob- 
lems. The results obtained, when of sufficient merit, will 
he published as 'Contributions from the Geological Labora- 
tory of Indiana University'. Professor Cumings and Asso- 
ciate Professor Beede. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 0:00 to 4 :50. 

13. Advanced Field Work. This work is described in the general 

announcement above. It consists of continuous work in the 
field for a month or more during the Summer vacation. It 
will usually be taken up as part of a research problem by 
candidates for an advanced degree. 
Open only to advanced students in Geology. 

14. Stratigraphic Geology. A thorough study of the literature of 

the various geologic systems. The history of their investi- 
gation and the present knowledge of their divisions, distribu- 
tion, faunas and paleogeography will be considered. Pro- 
fessor Cumings. 
Fall, Winter and Spring terms. Lectures Tuesday and Thurs- 
day, at 10:00. 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Joshua William Beede. 

24. 'Stratigraphy of the Eastern Outcrop of the Kansas Per- 
mian'. (Joint author with E. II. Sellards.) /// American Geologist, 
pp. 83-111, 2 pi. (1905.) 

25. 'Coal Measures Faunal Studies IV. (Joint author with 
Austin F. Rogers.) In Kansas University Science Bulletin, Vol. III. 
pp. ::77-:;^s. (loot;.) 



64 INDIANA UNIVEESITY 

26. 'Fauna of the Salem Limestone (in part) ; Protozoa to Pen- 
tremites ; Eehinoderma and Vermes; Brachiopoda and Peleeypoda'. 
00 pp.. 22 pi. In 30th Ann. Rep. Dept. Geol. and Nat. lies, of In- 
diana. (1906.) 

27. 'Invertebrate Paleontology of the Upper Permian Red Beds 
of Oklahoma and the Panhandle of Texas'. In Kansas Univ. Sci. 
Bull., Vol. IV. pp. 115-171, 4 pi. ( 10(»7. ) 

28. 'Iron Ores of Martin County, Indiana'. (Joint author with 
C. W. Shannon.) In 31st Ann. Rep. Dept. Geol. and Nat. lies.. In- 
diana, pp. 383-424, 5 pi. (1007.) 

20. 'Faunal Divisions of the Kansas Coal Measures'. (Joint 
author with Austin F. Rogers.) In Rep. Univ. Geol. Surv. of Kan- 
sas, Vol. IX, pp. 31S-3S5. 4 pi. (1000.) 

30. 'Formations of the Marion Stage of the Kansas Permian'. 
{In press.) 

Edgar R. Cumijstgs. 

IS. 'The Waverly Formations of Central Ohio'. (Joint author 
with C. S. Prosser.) In Arner. Geol., XXXIV. pp. 335-361, 3 pis. 
(Dec, 1004.) 

10. 'Development of Fenestella'. In Am. Jour. Sci.. XX, pp. 
100-177, 3 pis. (Sept., 1005.) 

20. 'On the Weathering of the Subcarhoniferous Limestones of 
Southern Indiana'. In Proc. Indiana Acad. Sci. for 1005, pp. S5-100, 
22 figures. (1006.) 

21. 'Fauna of the Salem Limestone of Indiana'. (Joint author 
with J. W. Beede and others.) In 30th Ann. Rept. Dept. Geol. and 
Nat. Res. Indiana, pp. 1189-1486, 47 pis. (1006.) 

22. 'The Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Cincinnati Series 
of Indiana'. In 32d Ann. Rept. Dept. Geol. and Nat. Res. Indiana, 
pp. 607-1180, 55 pis., 16 text figures and 6 maps. (1908.) 

1'. ( !. Gbeene. 

1. 'Fauna of the Florena shales of the Grand Summit section of 
Kansas and remarks on the Development of Derbya multistriata Meek 
and Ilayden'. /// Proc. [ndiana Acad. S<i. for 1907, pp. 114-127, 
3 pis. 

2. 'The Development of a Carboniferous Brachiopod, Chonetes 
granulifer, Owen'. In dour, of Geology, XVI, pp. G54-6G3, 4 pis. 
(Oct-Nov., L908.) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 65 

."'>. 'Ferns of Bloomington, Indiana'. In Fern Bulletin (Oct., 
1908). 

\. 'Notes on the Ferns of Southern Indiana'. In Fern Bulletin 
( [in pr< sv | . 

5. 'Tin 1 Permian-Cretaceous contact in Northern Kansas'. In 
Kansas University Quarterly ( [in press). (1909.) 

f>. 'Fauna of the Brazil limestone'. In 33d Ann. Kept. Dept. 
Cool. Nat. Res. Indiana (in press). (1909.) 

C. W. Shannon. 

1. 'The roads and road materials of Monroe County, Indiana'. 
In 30th Ann. Kept. Dept. Ceol. Nat. Res. Indiana, pp. 941-967; 10 
pis., 1 map. (1905.) 

2. 'Drainage area of the Fast Fork of White River'. In Proc. 
Indiana Acad. Sci. for 1906, pp. 53-70; 10 pis., 1 map. (1907.) 

3. 'The Iron Ore deposits of Indiana'. In 31st Ann. Rept. 
Dept. Ceol. Nat. Res. Indiana, pp. 299-42S ; 19 pis., 1.7 text figures, 
5 maps. (1907.) 

4. 'The Indiana Soil Survey. Indiana Soil Types'. In 32d 
Rept. Dept. Geol. Nat. Res. Indiana, pp. 17-118 ; 12 text figures. 
(1908.) 

5. 'Soil Survey of Monroe, Brown, Lawrence, Martin, Orange, 
Washington and Jackson Counties'. (Joint author with L. C. Sni- 
der.) In 32d Ann. Rept. Dept. Geol. Nat. Res. Indiana, pp. 119-196; 
19 text figures, 7 maps. (1908.) 

6. 'Soil Survey of Perry, Dubois and Crawford Counties'. In 
'.'.'.'A Ann. Rept. Dept. Geol. Nat. Res. Indiana (in press). (1909.) 

Essie A. Smith (Mrs. Alexander Shannon). 

1. 'Development and Variation of Pentrcmites conoidens'. In 
30th Ann. Rept. Dept. Geol. Nat. Res. Indiana, pp. 1219-1242; 5 pis.. 
3 text figures. (1906.) 

L. ( '. Snider. 

1. 'Soil Survey of Monroe, Brown, Lawrence, Martin, Orange. 
Washington and Jackson Counties'. (Joint author with C. W. Shan- 
non, t In 32d Ann. Rept. Dept. Geol. Nat. Res. Indiana, pp. 119- 
196; 19 text figures, 7 maps. (1908.) 

2. 'Soil Survey of Daviess County'. In 33d Ann. Rept. Dept. 
Geol. Nat. Res. Indiana (in press). (1909.) 

T5] 



0*6 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Robert E. Lyons, Professor. 

Louis S. Davis, Professor. 

Oliver W. Brown, Associate Professor. 

Frank C. Mathers, Assistant Professor. 

Clarence E. May, Assistant Professor. 

The Department of Chemistry has general, special, and 
private laboratories, a library room, a lecture room, bal- 
ance rooms, an incubator room, a stock room, museum, etc. 
Special laboratories are provided for electrochemistry, 
assaying and electric furnace work, organic, inorganic 
and physiological chemistry, water and gas analysis, spec- 
troscopic analysis. The laboratories comprise eleven 
large, well-lighted rooms, equipped with workstands, ca- 
pable of accommodating two hundred and seventy-five 
students. Each room is provided with fume hoods and 
air registers connected with a ventilating fan for the re- 
moval of offensive and poisonous gases. 

The general equipment for graduate work, including 
laboratory and library facilities, has been materially in- 
creased during the past year. A laboratory for electro- 
metallurgy has been installed and fully equipped. 

Special attention is given to inorganic, organic, physi- 
ological, physical and electro chemistry, technical analyt- 
ical chemistry, and electro-metallurgy. 

The graduate work of the Department, leading to the 
degrees A.M. and Ph.D.. comprises advanced laboratory, 
lecture, library and seminary work in the lines indicated 
above, and special graduate courses described below. A 
Ihesis embodying original investigation is required for an 
advanced degree. 

Graduate students should have a reading knowledge 
of German and French. 



QBADUATE school 67 

II. Seminary. Lleports od currenl literature and special topics. 

(li Fall term: Lnorganic Chemistry. Assistant Professor 
Mathers. (2) Winter term: Organic Chemistry. Pro- 
fessoi Lyons and Assistant Professor May. (3) Spring 
term: Electro- and Industrial Chemistry. Associate Pro- 
fessor I'.Kow \ and Assistant Professor May. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, Th., at 7:00 p.m. 

III. Research. Professor Lyons. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 8:00 to 4:50. 

Open to fourth year and graduate students. 

19. Physical Chemistry. Laboratory work in physico-chemical 
measurements supplementary to the lectures. Includes cali- 
bration of instruments, determination of molecular weights, 
thermo-chemical measurements, a study of the properties of 
solutions, the speed of chemical reactions, etc. Research 
work. Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Gamble. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 
( tetwald-Luther, 'Physiko-cheruische Messungen'. 

22. Electrochemistry. (A) Lectures on the general theory and 
laws of electrochemistry, and the principles and methods em- 
ployed in the electrodeposition of metals for quantitative an- 
alysis, plating, separating, and refining. (B) Laboratory 
work in quantitative electrolytic analysis, electrochemical 
measurements and electroplating. Associate Professor Brown 
and Mr. Gamble. 

Winter term. Lectures T. Th., at S :00 ; laboratory work, M. 
W. F., 1 :00 to 4 :50. 

Lehfelt, 'Electrochemistry' ; Classen, 'Quantitative Electrolytic 
Analysis'; Pfanhauser, "Elektroplattirung'. 

Presupposes Chemistry 1 and 3, and Physics 1 and 2. 

23 Electrochemistry. (A) Lectures. Electrolysis and electro-syn- 
thesis of inorganic and organic compounds, primary and sec- 
ondary batteries, and a study of the various electrochemical 
and electro-metallurgical processes which are of commercial 
importance. ( li) Laboratory work in the preparation of in- 
organic and organic compounds by electrolytic and electro- 
thermal methods, and in testing primary and storage bat- 
teries. Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Gamrle. 



68 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Spring term. Lectures T. Th., at 8 :00 ; laboratory work, M. 
W. F., 1 :0U to 4 :50. 

Elbs, 'Electrolytic Preparations' ; Borchers, 'Electric Smeltins 
and Refining'. 

24. Advanced Electrochemistry and Electro-metallurgy. (A) Ad- 

vanced laboratory work and research in pure and applied 
electrochemistry and electro-metallurgy, including investiga- 
tions in electric furnace work, refining and extraction of 
metals, electro-synthesis of organic and inorganic compounds, 
manufacture of storage batteries, and of industrial electro- 
chemical processes. (B) Lectures on the design and opera- 
tion of commercial electric furnaces and on electric furnace 
processes and products. Associate Professor Brown and 
Mr. Gamble. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Laboratory work, daily, 8 :00 
to 4 :50 ; lectures, Winter term, F., at 8 :00. 

Students in this course are recommended to take Physics 10 
and 24, 

25. Advanced Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course G. 

(A) Lectures and recitations on selected chapters of organic 
chemistry. The topics considered in 1909 were : (a) The 
radical, (b) benzene nucleus, (c) stereoisomerism of car- 
bon, (d) sugars, purins, proteins, terpenes and alkaloids. 

(B) Laboratory work or research in synthetic or analytical 
organic chemistry. Assistant Professor May. 

(.4) Winter and Spring terms, T. Th., 11:00. (B) Fall, 
Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8 :00 to 4 :50. 

Cohen, 'Text Book of Organic Chemistry' ; Koscoe and Schor- 
lemer, 'Treatise on Chemistry' ; Hammers ten, 'Physiological 
Chemistry' ; llensler-Pond, 'Terpenes'. 

Presupposes Courses G\ 6 2 , 7. 

2';. Chemical Engineering. Machinery, appliances and materials 
of construction in the chemical industries. Laws and prin- 
ciples involved in the operation of chemical processes on an 
industrial scale. Associate Professor Bhown. 

Fall term. Lectures, M. W. F., at 8:00. 

I>;ivis. 'Chemical Engineering'. 

Open to Seniors and graduates. 



UKADUATE SCHOOL 69 

!".». Storage Batteries, i l» Lectures and recitations on the theory, 

operation, testing and design of storage batteries. (B) 
Laboratory work in the testing and building of storage bat- 
teries. Associate Professor BROWN. 

Fall term, lectures F., at 8:00; laboratory work, one or more 
periods a week. 

Dolezalek, 'Theory of the Fend Accumulator'; Lyndon, 'Stor- 
age Battery Engineering'. 

For advanced work in the manufacture of storage batteries see 
( Ihemistry 24. 

13. Elementary Metallurgy and Assaying. The course is given in 
alternate years. (A) Laboratory work. The fire assay of 
gold, silver, and lead ores. (B) Lectures on assaying and 
on elemental y metallurgy, including a discussion of typical 
metallurgical processes. Associate Professor Brown and 
Mr. Gamble. 

Pall term, lectures T. Th., at 8:00; laboratory work, F. S., 
8 :00 to 11 :50. 

Brown, 'Manual of Assaying' ; Robert- Austen, 'Introduction to 
the Study of Metallurgy'. 

Presupposes Geology 2 and Chemistry 5. 

15. Quantitative Analysis. Advanced laboratory practice in tech- 
nical and engineering analysis. The work is selected to meet 
the particular need of the student and as a preparation for 
actual work in commercial laboratories in the following lines : 
Iron ores, pig iron and steel ; clay, limestone, rock and ce- 
ment ; soaps, fertilizers, soils, and foods ; oils, varnishes 
and paints ; testing of chemical reagents and water for in- 
dustrial use ; alloys, ores of copper, zinc, lead, tungsten, 
vanadium, manganese. The use of the microscope, spectro- 
scope and refractometer in the examination of certain com- 
mercial products, foods, and beverages. Assistant Professor 
Mathers. 
Spring term, daily, 8 :00 to 4 :50. Students will be received at 
any time during the term. 

Presenilis, 'System of Quantitative Analysis' ; Sutton, 'Volu- 
metric Analysis' ; Stillman, 'Engineering Chemistry' ; Ulzer 
and Fraenkel, 'Techno-riicmical Analysis': Classen, 'Quan- 



70 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

titative Analysis'; Olsen, 'Quantitative Analysis'; collateral 
reading. 
Presupposes Courses 1-, 3. 4, and 5. This course is also open 
to special students. 

31. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Laboratory work. The prep- 

aration and study of the properties and reactions of the dif- 
ferent compounds of the rare and uncommon elements, fol- 
lowed by research. This includes a review of the literature 
relating to the element that is being studied. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Mathers. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., 8 :00 to 4 :50. 

32. Gas and Fuel Analysis. (A) Lectures and recitations. Theory 

of gas and fuel analysis, and a description of the apparatus 
used. Calculation and interpretation of data dealing with 
problems in gas and fuel testing. {B) Laboratory work. 
Use and manipulation of the apparatus used in commercial 
gas analysis. Analysis of mixtures of gases, air, illumina- 
ting gas, and producer gas. Approximate and ultimate analy- 
sis of coal. Heating evaluation of coke, coal, oil, and peat, 
by the Parr calorimeter. Three-hour course. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Mathers. 

Winter term, lectures T., at 1 :00 ; laboratory work at hours to 
be arranged. 

Hempel-Dennis, 'Gas Analysis' ; Gill, 'Gas and Fuel Analysis 
for Engineers'. 

33. Spectrum Analysis and Sugar Analysis. (A) Lectures and 

Recitations. Theory and description of apparatus used in 
spectrum analysis. Outlines of the characteristic spectra of 
the different elements as used in qualitative analysis. De- 
scription of apparatus and the methods used in sugar an- 
alysis. (I!) Laboratory work. Use of a Kruess spectro- 
scope in mapping the emission, spark and absorption spectra 
of certain elements. Qualitative analysis with the spectro- 
scope of unknown samples and of certain commercial prod- 
ucts and minerals. Analysis of sugar by the polariscope and 
by chemical means according to the methods used in com- 
mercial sugar laboratories. Assistant Professor MATHERS. 



GB LDUATE SCHOOL 71 

Fall term. lectures, P., 1:00; laboratory work at hours to be 

arranged. 
Watts, 'Introductiou to the Study of Spectrum Analysis'; Baly, 

'Spectroscopy'; Rolfe, 'The Polariscope'. 

PUBLICATIONS P>Y MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

<)I.I\i:k W. Bbown. 

5. 'Electric Smelting of Zinc'. (Joint author with Wm. F. 
Oesterle.) /// Trans. Amer. Electrochem. Soc, 8, 171 (1905). 

6. 'Reduction of Metal Sulphides'. In Trans. Amer. Electro- 
chem. Soc. 9, 109 (1906). 

7. 'Electrodeposition of Copper upon Iron". (Joint author with 
F. C. Mathers.) In Jour. Phys. Chein., 10, 39 (190G). 

S. 'Treatment of Storage Battery Elements Before Putting 
Them Out of Commission'. (Joint author with R. R. Sayers.) hi 
Trans. Amer. Electrochem. Soc., 12, 311 (1907). 

Robebt Edward Lyons. 

IS. 'The Composition of Fourteen Indiana Clays'. In Annual 
Report of State Geologist, 1904. 

19. 'The Composition and Methods for the Analysis of Peat'. 
In Annual Report of State Geologist, 1900, pp. 9.3-107. 

20. 'The Composition of Forty Iron Ores from Indiana'. In 
Annual Report of State Geologist, 1900. 

21. 'An Investigation of the Fuel Value of Indiana Peat and 
Indiana Coal". In Proceedings Indiana Acad. Sci. for 1907. 

22. 'The Chemical Composition of Indiana Soils and Methods 
for Soil Analysis'. /// Annual Report State Geologist, 1907. 

23. 'Concerning a-Di-Xaphtyl Selenide and Telluride'. (Joint 
author with G. C. Bush.) In Jour. Am. Chein. Soc, Vol. XXX, 
pp. 831-836, 1908; in Chemical Abstracts, Vol. 2, p. 2235. 

24. 'A Chemical Examination and Calorimetric Test of Indiana 
Peats'. (Joint author with C. C. Carpenter.) In Jour. Am. Chem. 
Soc, Vol. XXX. pp. 1307-1311; in Chemical Abstracts, Vol. 2, p. 
3277. 

25. 'The Destruction of Platinum Crucibles Through the Igni- 
tion of Magnesium Ammonium Phosphate'. h\ Proc. Indiana Acad. 
Sci.. 1908. 

20. 'Notes on the Destruction of Platinum Crucibles in Phos- 
phate Analysis', hi Jour. Industrial and Eng. Chem., Vol. I, 1909. 



72 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Frank C. Mathers. 

1. 'Electrodeposition of Copper Upon Iron'. (Joint author with 
O. W. Brown.) In Jour. Physical Chemistry, p. 39. 190G. 

2. 'A Study of the Atomic Weight of Indium'. In Jour. Amer. 
Chem. Soc, pp. 486-496. 1907. 

3. 'Eine Studie iiber das Atomgewicht des Indiums'. In Berichte 
der Deutschen Chemischen Gesellschaft, pp. 1220-3234. 1907. 

4. 'The Formation of Selenic Acid from Lead Selena te'. In 
Proc. Indiana Acad. Sci., 1907. 

5. 'A Method for the Separation of Iron from Indium'. In 
Jour. Amer. Chem. Soc, pp. 209-211. 1908. 

6. 'The Electrolytic Formation of Selenic Acid from Lead Sele- 
nate'. In Jour. Amer. Chem. Soc, pp. 1374-1378. 1908. 

7. 'Some New Compounds of Indium'. In Jour. Amer. Chem. 
Soc, pp. 211-216. 1908. 

8. 'An Evolution Method for the Determination of Sulphur in 
Sulphates'. In Proc Ind. Acad. Sci., 1908. 

Clarence Earl May. 

1. 'Dissertation Concerning Some Nitrogen and Oxygen Ethers 
of the Type —COP :N— <- — C :O.NP— in the Quinazoline Scries". 
p. 52, New York. 

2. 'On the Quantitative Determination of Mucoid in Urine. 
Blood and Tissue Extracts'. (Joint author with W. J. Gies). Jour- 
nal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. Ill, p. 42; Proceedings of the 
American Society of Biological Chemistry, 1907. 

3. 'On Certain Quinazoline Oxygen Ethers'. (Joint author 
with M. T. Bogert.) In Jour. Am. Chem. Soc, Vol. XXI, pp. H07- 
513. (1909.) Assistant editor 'Chemical Abstracts', Vol. II, 1908. 

G. A. ROUSH. 

1. 'The Electrolytic Preparation of Iodoform from Acetone'. 
/// Trans. Amer. Electrochem. Soc, 8, 281 (.1905). 



<;i; \nr \TK SCHOOL 7:} 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 

l>\\ii) M. Mother, Professor. 

Frank M. Andrews, Associate Professor. 

James M. Van Hook. Assistant Professor. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Bot- 
any are required to pursue a minimum of forty-five hours 
of work or its equivalent in the Department, together 
with one year's work in some other science. Students 
arc urged to learn to read German books and papers on 
Botany. 

Graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Arts 
in Botany comprises special studies along some line indi- 
cated in the advanced courses enumerated below, or the 
investigation of some problem of a more limited scope. 
For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the subject of the 
thesis is selected from some line of morphology, cytology, 
or physiology. A reading knowledge of German and 
French is assumed. 

The Department occupies the second floor of Owen 
Hall, together with special laboratories in the basement, 
and a small greenhouse. On the second floor are the three 
well-lighted general laboratories, the office and private 
laboratory, the departmental library, and the general 
storeroom. A dark room for photographic and experi- 
mental work, constant temperature and incubator rooms, 
and a winter storage and work room are in the basement. 
The west laboratory on the second floor is used also for 
the Department lecture room. It is provided with a Zeiss 
projection apparatus by which it is possible to project 
upon the screen various phenomena of plant life, living 
organisms of miscroscopic size, miscroscopic preparations 



7-4 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

of tissues and organs, as well as lantern slides and other 
transparencies. 

The departmental library contains the more necessary 
Avorks of reference and the principal botanical journals. 

The research work in this Department during the past 
three or four years has been confined to studies in spora- 
genesis and spermatogenesis among higher plants. 

4. Morphology of Fungi. A study of the life-history of represen- 
tatives of the great groups of fungi, supplemented by a sys- 
tematic acquaintance with various genera of the local flora. 
Lectures and laboratory work. Assistant Professor Van 
Hook. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1 :00 to 3:00. 

5a. Physiology. Problems for investigation will be assigned to stu- 
dents who are prepared to do original work. Associate Pro- 
fessor Andrews. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

0. Cytology. Practical application of modern methods in a study 
of nuclear and cell-division. Professor Mottier. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

13. Morphology of the Algae. A study of the life-history and of 
the development of vegetative and reproductive organs in 
representative algae. The work is confined very largely to 
fresh-water forms. Lectures and laboratory work. Pro- 
fessor Mottier. 
Fall term, daily, 1 :30 to 5:00. 

7. Original Research. Problems for special investigation will be 
assigned to students who are prepared to undertake original 
work. Professor Mottier. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 
Ability to read German and French is assumed. 

is. Investigations in Mycology and Plant Pathology. Assistant 
Professor Van Hook. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 1:00 to 3:00. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 75 

PUBLICATIONS P.Y MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Prank .Makio.n Andrews. 

4. 'Physiological Apparatus'. In Proceedings of the Indiana 
Academy of Science, 1904. 

5. 'The Effect of Gases on Nuclear Division'. In Annals of 
Botany, Oct., 1905. 

('». 'Die Anatomie von Epigaea repens'. In Beihefte zum Bo- 
tanischen Centralblatt, Band XIX. Abt. I, Heft. 2, 1905. 

7. 'Plasmodesmen'. In Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of 
Science, 1905. 

8. 'The Effect of Alkaloids and Other Vegetable Poisons on 
Protoplasm". /// Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science, 
1905. 

9. 'Some Monstrosities in Trillium'. In Proceedings of the In- 
diana Academy of Science, 1905. 

10. 'A Natural Proof that the Root Tip Alone is Sensitive to 
the Gravitation Stimulus'. In Proceedings of the Indiana Academy 
of Science. 1905. 

11. 'Some Monstrosities in Trillium'. In The Plant World. 
May, 1900. 

12. 'An Abnormal Porella Platyphylla'. In Botanical Gazette, 
Vol. XLV, 1908. 

Harry B. Brown. 

'Algal Periodicity in Certain Ponds and Streams'. In Bull. Tori. 
Bot Club. 35, 223-248, 3 text figures, 1908. 

.1. M. Van Hook. 

1. 'Diseases of Ginseng'. /// Cornell Univ. Exp. Sta. Bull. 219, 
June, 1904. 

2. 'Brown Rot, Its Effect on Fruit, Twigs, Leaves and Blos- 
soms'. 1 1, Ohio State Hort. Rep., 1904. 

3. 'Ascochyta Pisi, a Disease of Seed Peas'. In Ohio Natural- 
ist. Apr.. 1900. 

4. 'A Cause of Freak Peas'. In Torreya, Apr., 1906. 

5. 'Blighting of Field and Garden Peas'. /// Ohio Agr. Exp. 
Sta. Bull. 173. Apr., 1906. 

6. 'A Disease of Ginseng Duo to Phytopkthora'. /// Special 
Crops. May, 1906. 



76 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

7. 'Dying of Bearing Grape-Vines'. (Joint author with A. D. 
Selby.) In Ohio Agr. Exp. Sta. Circ. 64. Feb., 1907. 

8. 'Celery Root Rot'. In Ohio Agr. Exp. Sta. Circ. 72. Aug., 
1907. 

Charles E. Lewis. 

'Studies on Some Anomalous Dicotyledonous Plants'. In Bot. 
Gaz., 37 : 127-138, 2 pi., 1904. 

Isaac M. Lewis. 

'The Behavior of the Chromosomes in Pinus and Thuja'. In 
Ann. Bot., 22 : 529-556, 4 pi., 1908. 

I). M. MOTTIER. 

24. 'The Embryology of Some Anomalous Dicotyledons'. In 
Ann. Bot., 19 : 447-463, 4 pi., 1904. 

25. 'The Development of the Heterotypic Chromosomes in Pollen 
Mother-Cells'. In Ann. Bot., 21: 309-347, 4 plates, 1907. 

26. 'The History and Control of Sex'. In Proc. Ind. Acad. Sci. 
for 1907. 

27. 'The Present Status of the Chromosome Controversy'. In 
Pros. Ind. Acad. Sci. for 1905. 

28. 'The Blooming of Gercis Canadensis in September'. /// 
Proc. Ind. Acad. Sci. for 1905. 

29. 'A Peculiar Monstrosity in a Seedling of Zca Mays'. In 
Proc. Ind. Acad. Sci. for 1905. 

30. 'Some Anomalies in the Endosperm of Pinus. In Proc. 
Ind. Acad. Sci. for 1908. 

31. 'The Development of the Heterotypic Chromosomes in Hie 
Megaspore Mother-Cell of Lilium. Ann. Bot., 23, 1909. (In press.) 

WlLJJAM L. WOODBURN. 

1. 'A Remarkable Case of Polyspermy in Feins'. In Bot. Gaz., 
44, 1907. 

2. 'Notes on the Native Seedless Persimmon' (preliminary re- 
port). /// Proc. Ind. Acad. Sci. for 1908. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 77 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Carl II. Kim \m a\\. Professor and Director of the Biological Sta- 
tion. 

('iiari.es Zei.e.ny. Associate Professor. 

Full work leading- to the degree Ph. D. is offered in 
Course 6. It is purely a research course and offers the 
widest choice of subjects commensurate with the equip- 
ment of the Department, 

The subjects selected have radiated from two centers. 
One of these is the problem or problems of the fresh water 
fauna of tropical America. At the present the Depart- 
ment is engaged in a study of divergent evolution as 
shown by the tropical American Characin fishes and on a 
monograph on the fishes of British Guiana. 

The Department is well equipped for this work. The 
most important of the zoological collections is the collec- 
tion of fishes, comprising many thousand specimens. Ar- 
rangements have been made for cooperation with various 
other institutions by which the largest aggregation of col- 
lections of South American freshwater fishes in the world 
is available for a monograph in preparation. Collections 
have been received from Central America, through the 
Field Museum of Chicago ; from Brazil, through the Brit- 
ish Museum, and especially through the Museu Paulista of 
Sao Paulo, Brazil, and the National Museum at Rio de 
Janeiro. South American collections have been loaned by 
the Philadelphia Academy of Sciences, by the U. S. Na- 
tional Museum and Stanford University. By special ar- 
rangement the collections of Harvard University, made by 
L. Agassiz and his assistants during the Thayer expedi- 
tion, and by others, are available for a monograph on the 
American Characins. 'Flit 1 first section of this is in press. 

The Department lias entered into vital relations with 



78 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

the Carnegie Museum of Pittsburg. Under the direction 
of Dr. W. J. Holland, director of this Museum, Mr. John 
Haseman, A.M., '07, of this University, has been exploring 
the coastal rivers of Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina, be- 
tween the Rio San Francisco and Buenos Aires. Mr. 
TTaseman will devote the summer to the Paraguay basin. 

During August to December, Prof. Eigenmann and Mr. 
S. E. Shideler, as volunteer assistant, explored the Dema- 
rara, Essequibo and Potaro Rivers of British Guiana. 
Very extensive collections were made in the lowland as 
well as above the Kaieteur, a vertical fall of 741 feet, of 
the Potaro River. The collections obtained are very rich 
in new species and duplicates of little known species. The 
results of the expedition are being published by the Car- 
negie Museum as reports of the British Guiana Expedition 
of Indiana University and the Carnegie Museum. 

The second center of departmental interest has been 
and is the subject of heredity, especially: (A) The his- 
tory of the sex cells, (B) Variation, (0) The rate of onto- 
genic and phylogenic modification of the sense organs of 
cave animals, (/)) Regeneration. 

For the study of (0) cave animals, the facilities of the 
Department are ideal. The University is located at the 
o{\^ of the great cave region. By act of the Legislature 
the Donaldson estate near Mitchell, Indiana, lias been 
placed in the keeping of the trustees of [ndiana Univers- 
ity. On it are situated numerous sink holes, dry caves 
and an underground water-course at least two miles long. 
This underground river is rich in blind lishes and other 
blind aquatic animals. A small Laboratory dwelling has 
been erected on the Farm and is in charge of a research 
assistant appointed from year to year. Applications for 
the assistanlship should be senl to C. II. Eigenmann. Ap- 



GB LDUATE school 7!) 

plicants musl be able to be self-directive in Large measure. 
In the study of cave animals the Department lias in the 
pasl had the cooperation of the Carnegie Institution, the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, 
and the Elizabeth Thompson Science Fund. A sum- 
marial volume on the work so far done has just been is- 
sued from the press of the Carnegie Institution, Washing- 
ton, I). C. 

For the study of (B) variation in non-migratory ver- 
tebrates in a "unit of environment" this Department or- 
ganized and has since maintained a fresh-water Biological 
Station. It is at present located on AVinona Lake, Kosci- 
usko County, Indiana, in the grounds of the Winona As- 
sembly. The Station owns, as a gift of the Winona As- 
sembly, two buildings, 20x45 feet, each two stories high. 
The buildings are on the lake front, at the mouth of 
Cherry (reck. The Station also owns boats, nets, sound- 
ing and temperature apparatus, glassware, etc. Micro- 
scopes and other needed apparatus are moved to the Sta- 
tion from the University.* 

For the study of {!)) regeneration, under the sole di- 
rection of Dr. Zeleny, the Department owns all the neces- 
sary glassware, and a small stream flowing through the 
campus, and various small ponds about Bloomington offer 
an abundance of material. 

3. Advanced Zoology. The work in this course is entirely indi- 
vidual. Each student selects, with the cooperation of the 
professor, some limited subject for special investigation. This 
course will serve for each student as an introduction to his 
special work in the Graduate School. Professor Eigenmann 
and Associate Professor Zeleny. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, one to fifteen hours a week. 
Selected monographs,' 



♦Further information concerning the Station will be found in the announce- 
ment of sprint;; and summer courses, for which address the Registrar. 



80 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

4a. General Biological Problems : The development of the idea of 
evolution and Darwinism. Lectures and reports. Professor 

ElGENMANN. 

Winter term, M. W. F., at 8 :00. 

4ft. General Biological Problems. The laws and theories of hered- 
ity. Lectures and reports. Professor Eigenmann. 
Spring term, T. Th., at 8 :00. 

5. Seminary. Weekly meetings of advanced students and in- 

structors to discuss current literature and report on investi- 
gations in progress. Professor ElGENMANN and Associate 
Professor Zeleny. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 4 :00. 

6. Research. Special investigation of zoological problems, with a 

report on each investigation. Branches in which subjects 
have in the past been selected and reported upon are Varia- 
tion, Degeneration, Regeneration, Sense Organs, Embryology 
of Fishes, Faunal and Systematic Studies of Fishes, Ecology 
of Cave and Freshwater Animals. For a fuller statement, 
see the general account of the Department. Professor 
Eigenmann and Associate Professor Zeleny. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8 :00 to 4 :50. 

7. Biological Survey. A continuation of the previous year's work 

in the physical and biological features of Winona Lake and 
its environs. Professor Eigenmann. 
Summer terms at the Biological Station. 

The results obtained by students in Courses 3, 6 and 7, 
together with articles of the permanent staff of the De- 
partment, are published in various ways as contributions 
from the Zoological Laboratory of Indiana University. 
Of this scries 106 numbers have been completed. A list of 
the titles from 1 to 58 was published in the Bulletin, vol. 
I, No. 4 (November, 1903), and subsequent additions in 
catalogue numbers of the Bulletin, -vols. I, III, IV, V, and 
VI. 



<;i; \Di ati: SCHOOL 81 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

A. M. Banta. 

1. 'The Fauna of Mayfield's Cave'. Carnegie Institution Pub- 
lications, No. 67, pp. 1-114. pi. 1. Sept., 1007. 

2. 'The Life History of Amblystoma opacum'. (Joint author 
with W. L. McAtee.) /// Proceed. U. S. Nat. Museum, XXX. pp. 67- 
83, plates VHI-X. 1006. 

Marion L. Dubbin (Mrs. Max M. Ellis). 

1. 'An Analysis of the Kate of Regeneration Throughout the 
Regeneration Process'. Journ. Exp. Zool. In press. 

2. 'Reports of the Expedition to British Guiana of Indiana 
University and the Carnegie Museum of Pittsburg'. 2. 'New Spe- 
cies of He mi gram mus aud Hyphessobrycon' '. In press. In Ann. Car- 
negie Mus., VI, Pittsburg. 

Carl H. Eigenmann. 

Hi'. 'The Gyinnotidse'. (Joint author with David Perkins 
Ward.) In Proc. Wash. Acad. Sci., VII, pp. 150-188, plates VII- 
XI. June, 1005. 

143. 'The Fishes of Panama". In Science, N. S. XXII, pp. 18- 
20. July 7. 1005. 

144. 'Freshwater Fishes of South and Middle America'. In 
Pop. Sci. Mo., June, 1006, pp. 515-530. 

145. 'The Smithsonian Institution and Research'. In Science. 
X. S. XXIV, pp. 553-556. Nov. 2, 1006. 

146. 'An Account of Amazon River Fishes Collected by J. P>. 
Steere, with a Note on Pimelodus Clarias'. (Joint author with Bar- 
ton A. Bean.) In Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. XXXI, pp. 650-668. Jan. 
16, 1007. 

147. 'On a Collection of Fishes from Buenos Aires'. In Proc. 
Wash. Acad. Sci. VIII, pp. 440-458, plates XXI-XXIII. Mch. 4, 
1007. 

148. 'The Poeciliid Fishes of Rio Grande do Sol and the La 
Plata Basin'. In Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. XXXII, pp. 425-433. May 
23. 1007. 

1 19. 'An Annotated List of Characin Fishes in the United States 
Xational Museum and the Museum of Indiana University, with De- 
scriptions of New Species'. (Joint author with Fletcher Ogle. - ) 
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. XXXIII, pp. 1-36. Sept. 10, 1907. 

T6] 



82 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

150. 'Fowler's Heterognathus Fishes, with a Note on the Stetha- 
prioninae'. In The American Naturalist, XLI, 767-772. Dec, 1907. 

151. 'On Further Collections of Fishes from Paraguay'. (Joint 
author with David Perkins Ward.) In Ann. Carnegie Museum, IV. 
pp. 110-157, plates XXXI-XLV. 

152. 'Preliminary Descriptions of New Genera and Species of 
Tetragonopterid Characins'. In Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. 211, pp. 93- 
100. Dec, 1908. 

153. 'Adaptation'. In Fifty Years of Darwinism, pp. 182-208, 
plates III and IV. May. 1909. Henry Holt & Co. 

154. 'The Freshwater Fishes of Patagonia and an Examination 
of the Archiplata-Archhelenis Theory'. In Reports of the Princeton 
University Expeditions to Patagonia, 1896-1899, Vol. Zool. Ill, pp. 
225. Quarto. 

155. 'Blind Vertebrates of North America: a Study in De- 
generative Evolution'. Publication of the Carnegie Institution No. 
104. Quarto. 

156. 'The Heterognathi of America ; a Study in Divergent Evo- 
lution'. In Memoirs of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Part I. 
Quarto. In press. Part II in preparation. 

157. 'The Fishes'. /// Ward's Freshwater Biology. In press. 

Max M. Ellis. 

1. 'The Influence of the Amount of Injury Upon the Kate of 
Regeneration in Mancasellus macrourus Carman'. In Biol. Bull. 
XIII. pp. 107-113. (Aug.. 1907.) 

2. 'Notes on the Factors Controlling the Bate of Regeneration 
in nana clamata Daudin'. In Biol. Bull.. Vol. XIV, pp. 281-283. 
1908. 

3. 'The Relation Between the Amount Removed and the Amount 
Regenerated. In press. 

Walter Lewis IIaiin. 

1. 'Sonic Habits and Sensory Adaptations of Cave-Inhabiting 
Bats'. In Biol. Bull., Vol. XV, pp. 1:55-19:5, August and September. 
1908. 

2. 'Notes on the Mammals and Cold-Blooded Vertebrates of the 
Indiana University Farm, Mitchell, End.' In Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 
XXXV, pp. 545-581, Dec. 7, 1908. 

3. 'The Mammals of Indiana'. In press. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 83 

John Diedbich Haseman. 

1. 'A Now Campos toma from Indiana'. /// Proceedings of the 
[ndiana Academy of Sciences, pp. 161-163. 

2. The Direction of Differentiation in Regenerating Crustacean 
Appendages'. In Archiv fiir Entwickelungsmech. d. Organismen, 
XXIV. pp. (HT-t.:'.:. plates XIX-XXVII. (Dec. IT. 1907.) 

3. The Reversal of the Direction of Differentiation in the 
Chelipeds of the Hermit Crab'. In Archiv f. Entwickelungsmech. 
■ I. Organismen, XXIV. pp. 663-669, pi. XXI. (Dec 17, 1907.) 

Leonard Haseman. 

1. 'A Monograph of the North American PsychodidaV. In 

Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc, 1907. 

Thomas J. Headlee. 

1. "Ecological notes on the mussels of Winona Lake', joint au- 
thor with James Simonton. In Proceedings of the Indiana Academy 
of Sciences. 1903, pp. 173-180. 

2. "Ecological Notes on the Mussels of Winona, Pike and Cen- 
ter Lakes of Kosciusko County, Indiana'. In Biol. Bull. XI, pp. 30.*>- 
318. Nov., 1906. 

Ckrtrude Hitze. 

1. 'Bird nests of an old apple' orchard near the Indiana Uni- 
versity Campus'. In Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of 
Sciences for 1903. Pp. 167-173. 

Waldo Lee McAtee. 

II. 'The birds of the vicinity of Indiana University'. In Pro- 
ceedings of the Indiana Academy of Sciences, 1904, pp. 65-202. 

2. 'A List of the Mammals, Reptiles and Batrachians of Monroe 
County'. In Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Sciences. Proc. 
Biol. Soc., Wash., XX, pp. 1-16'. 

.**>. Set Banta and McAtee. 

Norman E. McIndoo. 

1. 'On some fishes of western Cuba'. In Proc. Phil. Acad. Nat. 
Se., 1907. 

Xkwto.n Miller; 

1. The fishes of the Motagua River. Guatemala'. /// Bull. 
Amer. Mns. Nat. Hist., XXIII, pp. 95-123. 



84 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Mrs. Effa Funk Muhse. 

1. 'The cutaneous glands of the toad'. In Journal of Anatomy. 
1909. 

Fletcher Ogle. 

See Eigenmann, No. 14!>. 

Fernandus 1'ayne. 

1. 'The eyes of the blind vertebrates of North America. VII. 
The eyes of Amphisbcena punctata (Bell). A Blind Lizard from 
Cuba'. In Biol. Bull., XI, pp. 60-67, plates I and II, July, 1906. 

2. 'The reactions of the blind fish Amblyopsis spelaeus to light'. 
In Biol. Bull., Vol. XIII, pp. 317-323. Nov., 1907. 

Frank H. Pike. 

1. 'The degenerate eyes in the Cuban cave shrimp. Palseinonetes 
Eigenmanni Hay'. In Biol. Bull., Vol. XI, pp. 267-276. Oct., 1906. 

Will Scott. 

1. 'An ecological study of the plankton of Shawnee cave'. //< 
press. 

James Simonton. 

See Headlee and Simonton. - 

Edna Russell Thayer. 

'A Day's Work in Bird-land'. In The Nature Study Review, 
II, pp. 2S9-295. 

David Perkins Ward. 

See Eigenmann, Nos. 142 and 157. 

Charles Zeleny. 

1. 'The early development of the hypophysis in Chelonia'. In 
Biological Bulletin. Vol. II, No. <;, pp. 267-281. 1901. 9 figs. 

2. 'A case of compensatory regulation in the regeneration of 
Hydroide8 dianthus'. In Archiv fur Entwickelungsmechanik der Or- 
ganismeri, XIII, pp. 597-609. U>02. 3 figs! 

3. 'The dimensional relations of I lie members of compound 
leaves'. In Bull. N. Y. Botanical Garden, Vol. 3. No. 9, pp. 134-174. 
13 figs. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 85 

1. \V study of the rate of regeneration of the arms in the brittle- 
fctar, Ophioglypha lacertosa\ In Biol. Bull., Vol. VI, Dec, 1903, im>. 
12-17. 1 fig. 

r>. 'Experiments on Hi" localization of developmental factors in 
the Nemertine egg'. 19 lius. In Journ. Exp. Zool., Vol. I, pp. 293- 
fcj9. 1!K>4. 

6. 'Compensatory Regulation', In Journ. Exp. Zool., Vol. 11, 
pp. 1-102. May, 1905. 29 figs. 

7. •Tlic rearing of Serpulid larvae, with notes on the behavior 
of the young animals', hi Biol. Bull., Vol. VIII. April, 190"). Pp. 
6)8-312. 'A figs. 

S. 'The direction of differentiation in a regenerating appendage'. 
In Science. Vol. XXI. 1905. 

'.». 'The regeneration of an antenna-like organ in place of the 
vestigial eye of the blind crayfish'. In Science, N. S. XXI. 1905. 

10. 'The relation of the degree of injury to the rate of regenera- 
tion". In Science, N. S. XXI. 1905. 

11. 'The regeneration of a double chela in the fiddler crab 
(Gelasimus pugilator), in place of a normal single one'. 1 fig. In 
Biol. Bull. IX. Aug., 1905. pp. 152-155. 

12. 'The relation of the degree of injury to the rate of regenera- 
tion'. 6 fius. In Journ. Exp. Zool., Vol. II, 347-3(39. 

13. 'The direction of differentiation in development. I. The 
antennule of Mancasellus macrourus'. In Archiv. f. Entwickelungs- 
mechanik, XXIII. March. 1907. pp. 324-343. 7 plates. 

14. 'The effect of degree of injury, successive injury and func- 
tional activity upon regeneration in the Scyphomedusan, Cassiopea 
xamachana'. In Journ. Exp. Zool., Vol. V. Dec, 1907. Pp. 2G7- 
274. figs. 4. 

15. 'Some internal factors concerned with the regeneration of 
the chelae of the Gulf-weed crab, Portunus Sayi'. In Carnegie Insti- 
tution of Washington. Tortugas Volume II, pp. 105-138. 2 text 
figures and 11 'table' figures. 1909. 



86 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 

William J. Moenkiiaus, Professor. 
Dennis E. Jackson, Assistant Professor. 

Facilities for research leading to the higher de- 
grees are available within restricted lines in general 
Physiology. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

(3. Advanced Physiology. A comprehensive experimental study of 
some selected phase of mammalian physiology or of general 
physiology. Laboratory work and assigned reading. Pro- 
fessor Moenkiiaus. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 

7. Pharmacology. An experimental course in the physiological 
action of the more important drugs upon mammals and am- 
phibia. Assistant Professor Jackson. 

Spring term, M. W. F., 1 :00 to 4 :50. 

Open to students who have passed in Courses 4 and 5. 

COURSE FOR GRADUATES 

10. Research. Problem work in certain phases of general physi- 
ology may be taken by those properly equipped. Professor 
Moenkiiaus, and Assistant Professor Jackson. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Dknnis Emmerson Jackson. 

0. 'The Prolonged Existence of Adrenalin in the Blood'. fit 
Am. Journ. of Physiol., Vol. XXIII, No. IV, p. 22(5-245. L909. 

WILLIAM J. Moenkiiaus. 

15. 'The Control of Sex". In Central States Monitor, Vol. X. 
No. 0, p. 215-2 IS. 11)07. 

10. 'Selective Fertilization among Fishes'. In press. 



GB \ Di \ti: SCHOOL 87 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

Bubton I>. Myers, Professor. 
Augustus G. Pohxman, Professor. 

Graduate work of this Department is giveD under 
Courses 13 and 15. These courses consist of special prob- 
lems in gross and microscopic anatomy. 

13. Research Work. Opportunity for research work will be offered 
to advanced students who may have at least one-half their 
time for one year free for the work. Professors Myers and 

PoilLMAN. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 

15. Advanced Course in Anatomy. Open to students who have com- 
pleted the dissection of the human body and desire to do 
special or advanced work. Professors Myers and Poiilman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Burton D. Myers. 

1. 'Anatomical Basis for Reflex Movements'. In Journal of the 
Indiana State Medical Association, for January, 1008. 

2. 'Review of Rauber's Lehrbuch der Anatomie des Menschen'. 
hi Anatomical Record. Nov., 1908. 

3. 'Psychotherapy'. In Journal of Indiana State Medical As- 
sociation, for April and May, 1900. 

Augustus G. Porn. max. 

1. 'Concerning the Embryology of Kidney Anomalies'. In 
American Medicine, Vol. VII, '04, 987-990. 

2. 'Developmental Relations of the Kidney and Ureter in Hu- 
man Embryos'. In Johns Hopkins Bull., Vol. XVI, '04, 49-51. 

.'!. "Abnormalities in Form of Kidney and Ureter dependent of 
the Development of the Renal Bud'. TUd, '04,51-69. 

4. 'A Case of Fused Kidneys'. In Indiana Med. Jr., Vol. 
XXIII, '04. 217-219. 



bh INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

5. 'Has a Persistence of the Miillerian Ducts any relation to 
the Condition of Cryptorchidism?' In American Medicine, Vol. VIII, 
"04 (1003-1006). 

6. 'The Etiology of Eyestrain from a Phylogenetic and Onto- 
genetic Standpoint'. In Jr. Amer. Med. Assc, May 6th, '05. 

7. 'Ein neues Projektionszeichenbrett'. In Ztsch. f. wiss. Mikr., 
Vol. XXIII, 41-44, '00. 

8. 'Some of the Disadvantages of the Upright Position'. /// 
American Medicine, Vol. I (new series), 541-540, '00. 

9. 'The Elements of Three Dimension Reconstruction'. Manu- 
script incorporated in Karl Peter's Methoden der Rekonstruction. G. 
Fischer, '06. 

10. 'The Purple Island by Phineas Fletcher'. In Johns Hopkins 
Bull., Vol. XVI, 317-321, '07. 

11. 'The Fetal Circulation through the Heart'. (Preliminary.) 
In Johns Hopkins Bull.. Vol. XVIII, 409-412, '07. 

12. 'Multiple Anomalies in the Upper Extremities of One Ca- 
daver'. In Jr. of Anat. and Phys., Vol. 42, Pt. IV, '08. 

13. Review of 'Treves' Surgical Applied Anatomy.' In Anat. 
Record, Vol. 2, No. 3. '08. 

14. 'The Course of the Blood through the Heart of the Fetal 
Mammal'. In Anat. Record, Vol. Ill, No. 2, 75-109. 

15. 'The Circulation of Mixed Blood in the Amphibian and Rep- 
tile, as well as in the Embryo Bird and Mammal'. In Proc. Indiana 
Acad. In press. 

16. 'The Development of the Cloaca in Human Embryos'. /// 
Jr. of Anatomy. In preparation. 

17. Review of 'Schultze's Topographische Anatomie', and Com- 
ing's 'Lehrbuch der topographischen Anatomic'. In Anat. Record. 
In preparation. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 89 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

IIknky R, AxBXJBGER, Professor. 

The Departmenl of Pathology is located in four Large, 
well-lighted rooms on the third floor of Wylie Hall. 
SPhese consist of a very Large main laboratory, a lecture 
mom and museum, an incubator and sterilizing room, and 
,i private office for the head of the Department. 

The main laboratory is capable of seating fifty or more 
workers at laboratory desks, is lighted from the north by 
large windows running to the ceiling and by three sky- 
lights, and contains a full equipment for workers in Bac- 
teriology and Pathology. Within this room there are 
built in two smaller rooms for special work in Bacteriol- 
ogy and Pathology and Pathological technique. Opening 
into the main room by an arched doorway is the sterilizing 
room, containing incubators, steam and hot air sterilizers, 
blood serum inspissator, water still, and water and elec- 
tric centrifuges. The room also contains cages for ani- 
mals for immediate use. 

Next to the main laboratory is a smaller room, capable 
of seating fifty students at lecture. It is also used as a 
museum. Here a collection of gross pathological speci- 
mens is rapidly being accumulated and mounted in a man- 
ner convenient for study and reference. 

The office of the head of the Department is near at 
hand and is furnished with a very complete working ref- 
erence library containing the majority of the periodicals 
on the subjects covered by the Department, in English, 
Uerman and French. 

In connection with the Department there is an animal 
barn in which are kept a number of the small laboratory 
animals for use in research. 



90 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

The apparatus and equipment is ample for any ordi- 
nary line of research in Pathology, and is of the best 
quality. No expense has been spared by the University 
to make the equipment of this Department complete. 

The undergraduate work consists of three terms' work 
of six hours each, covering the subjects of Bacteriology, 
General Pathology, and Special Pathology. (See Cata- 
logue.) 

4. Advanced work and research. Those who have had sufficient 
training or who show especial ability may obtain an oppor- 
tunity to enter upon advanced diagnostic work or research 
work under the direction of the head of the Department. 
This opportunity can only be offered to a limited number, 
but facilities can be offered for work along any of the lines 
of Pathological or Bacteriological research. Professor 
Alburger. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 4 :. r >0. 



EDUCATION 

William Lowe Bryan, President of the University, Acting Dean. 
* Ernest O. Holland, Professor of Secondary Education. 

William W. Black, Professor of the Science and Art of Teaching. 

Elmer E. Jones, Professor of the History and Philosophy of Edu- 
cation. 
George F. Arps, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology. 

Graduation from the School of Education, with the 
University degree of A.B. and a Bachelor's Certificate of 
Education, requires one hundred eighty credit hours, at 
least forty-five of which must he in pedagogical suhjects. 

Special programs of work for the AI.A. and Ph.D. de- 
grees, with the Master's and Doctor's Certificates of Edu- 
cation, will be recommended on application. In genera] 



*Ab.soiii on leave 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 91 

ilic work of one student will differ somewhal from that 
<>f another, according to the practical career the student 
has in view. 

A special bulletin, obtainable from the Registrar, con- 
la ins brief indications of the collateral courses in Biology. 
Psychology, Sociology, Philosophy, and History most 
likely to be of service to the graduate student in Educa- 
tion. 

In the future, as in the past, the best work of students 
in the courses in research work and the pedagogical semi- 
nary will be published under the head of 'Contributions 
from the Pedagogical Seminary of Indiana University,' 

The following are the graduate courses in Education : 

C>. History of Education. (1) Fall term: Education in primi- 
tive society. Oriental education, using China and Persia as 
types. Greek education and the development of individual- 
ism ; thorough study of the Greek educational theorists. 
Roman education and the practical ideals evolved. Her edu- 
cational theorists. (2) Winter term: General survey of 
education during the whole of the Middle Ages. The Renais- 
sance and humanistic conceptions of education. The per- 
manent type of the humanistic schools. (3) Spring term: 
The Reformation and the religious conceptions of this period. 
Luther, Melanchthon, and other reformers. Rousseau and 
education according to nature. Pestalozzi, Froebel, and 
Herbart. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8 :00. 

Open to students who have passed in Education 1 and 2, and 
History 1, 2, and 3. 

10. Philosophy of Education. (1) Fall term: A synthetic study 
of the constructive principles in the thought of educational 
thinkers from Descartes to the present time. Special em- 
phasis upon the conceptions of Bacon, Comenius, Rousseau, 
Pestalozzi, and Herbart. (2) Winter term : The formal 
side of the educative process will be given from the stand- 
point of the individual. Questions of inhibition, facilitation, 



92 INDIANA. UNIVERSITY 

period of infancy, play, current theories of discipline, inter- 
est, and correlation will be considered. (3) Spring term: 
Education will be considered chiefly in view of the demands 
which society makes upon the individual. The effort will be 
to harmonize the development of the child as an individual 
with the factors of the environment. Education will be 
shown to be a unifying of the individual and social forces to 
bring about harmony and efficiency. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 8 :00. 

Open only to Seniors and Graduate students who have passed in 
Courses 1 and 2. 

11. Principles of Organization and Supervision. Development of 
the law and principles that control in the organization and 
conduct of the school. The law evolving the school. The 
curriculum under its logical and psychological aspects ; the 
basis for making a course of study ; comparison of typical 
courses. Universal method in teaching. The organization of 
a subject. The organic relation of the logical, esthetic, and 
ethical ends in education. Professor Black. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. T. Th., at 2:00. 

Open to Graduate students, and to teachers of wide experience. 

16. Educational Seminary. Members meet once a week for the dis- 
cussion of some educational question decided upon at the 
beginning of the term. There will be reports upon assigned 
topics, lectures and discussions. Credit of from two to five 
hours. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, Th., at 2:00. 

Open only to Seniors and Graduate students. 

5. Research, Students who are majoring in Education for the 
A.M. or the Ph.D. degree should register in this course. A 
special problem of research will he assigned and must be 
worked out as a requisite for the higher degree. The re- 
search for the A.M. degree should extend over a period of at 
least one year after (he A.B. degree has been granted; for the 
Ph.D. degree the time will vary from two to four years, de- 
pending upon the ability of the student and the character 
of the research. Amount of credit to he arranged with the 
professor iu charge. 



(iK AIM A I i: SCHOOL 93 

a. The problems of the Elementary School. Professor Black. 

I>. The History and Philosophy of Education. Professor Jones. 

c. The Psychology of the Processes of Education. Associate Pro- 
fessor Arps. 

»/. Secondary Education. . 

Fall. Winter, Spring, and Summer terms, at hours to be 
arranged. 

PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

George Frederick Arps. 

1. 'Per Verlauf der Aufmerksamkeit bei rhythmischen Reizen\ 
(Joint author with O. Klemm.) In Wundt's Psychologische Studien', 
Hand. IV. Heft. G. 

1*. Cher den Austieg der Druckempfindungen'. In Wundt's 
'Psychologische Studien". Band IV, Heft. 4, 5. 

Elmer Ellsworth Jones. 

1. 'The Emotions and the Change from the Quadrupedal to the 
Erecl Posture*. In University of Colorado Studies, 1901. 

2. 'Suggestion: a Study in Education'. In University of Colo- 
rado Studies. 1902. 

3. 'The Psychic Value of Labor in the Evolution of Society'. 
/// University of Colorado Studies, 1902. 

4. 'The Early Reactions of Children to Sense Impressions'. In 
Proceedings of the Southern Educational Association, 1904, pp. 226- 
234. 

.">. 'The Function of the Normal School'. In Virginia School 
Journal, 1907. 

6. 'The Influences of Bodily Posture on Mental Activities'. In 
Columbia Contributions to Philosophy and Psychology, Vol. XVI, No. 
2, October, 1907. 

7. 'The Waning of Consciousness under Chloroform'. In 
Psychological Review, January, 3909. 

8. 'A Concrete Example of the Value of Individual Teaching'. 
In Psychological Clinic. December, 1908. 

9. Review of Stevenson Smith's 'The Limits of Educability in 
Paramoecium'. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology, and Scientific 
Methods. Vol. VI, No. 8, April U5. 1909. 

10. Review of Cliff Wmfield Stone's 'Arithmetical Abilities and 
some Factors determining them'. Educational Review. /// press, 



Y"~*~ 



Vol. VIII. No. 4. 



May 15, 1910 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 
BULLETIN 




GRADUATE SCHOOL 
1910 



Entered as second-ciass matter May 16, 1908, at the postoffice at Bloomington, Indiana, 
under act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



University Calendar 



SUMMER TERM, 1910 



June 23, Thursday. 
June 24, Friday. 



Aug. 2, Tuesday. 
Aug. 3, Wednesday. 



Sept. 2, Friday. 



Sept. 22, Thursday. 



Registration and enrollment for the 

Summer term . 
Recitations and lectures begin for the 

First half-term. (Instruction five 

days a week.) 
First half-term ends. 
Recitations and lectures begin for 

Second half-term. (Instruction six 

days a week. ) 
Summer term ends. 



FALL TERM, 1910-11 



Sept. 23, Friday. 

Nov. 24 and 25, Thursday 

and Friday. 
Dec. 16, Friday. 



Registration and enrollment in clast 

es for the Fall term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 

Thanksgiving recess. 
Fall term ends. 



WINTER TERM, 1910 



Jan. 3, Tuesday. 



Jan. 4> Wednesday. 
Jan. 20, Friday. 
Feb. 22, Wednesday. 
Mar. 24. Friday. 



Registration and enrollment in class- 
es for the Winter term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Foundation day, a holiday. 
Washington's birthday, a holiday. 
Winter term ends. 



SPRING TERM, 1910-11 



Mar 30, Thursday. 



Mar .;/, Friday. 
.1 u in 20, Tuesday 

.In he 21, Wednesday. 



Registration and enrollment in cla 

es for the Spring term. 
Recitations and lectures begin. 
Spring term ends. 
I diversity Commencement . 



(?) 



Contents 



PAGE 

Prefatory Note 5 

Officers and Faculty of the Graduate School 7 

( reneral statement of the graduate school 10 

Purpose and Administration 10 

Admission 10 

Fees 11 

The Library 12 

Degrees 13 

Master of Arts 13 

Doctor of Philosophy 14 

Application for Degrees 16 

Fellowships 16 

Teaching Fellowships 16 

Donaldson Fellowship in Zoology 16 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy 17 

Fellowships for Graduates of other Indiana Colleges 17 

Special Rule concerning Fellows 18 

University Organizations 19 

The Graduate Club 19 

Sigma Xi 19 

Departmental Clubs 19 

The Indiana Union 20 

The Women's League 21 

Departments and Graduate Courses, 1910-11 22 

Greek 22 

Latin 25 

Romance Languages 27 

German 29 

Comparative Philology 31 

English 33 

History and Political Science 36 

Economics and Social Science 40 

Philosophy 42 

Mathematics 43 

2—23217 (3) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 



PAGE 

Departments and Graduate Courses, 1910-11 — Continued 47 

Mechanics and Astronomy 47 

Physics 49 

Chemistry 51 

Geology 54 

Botany 57 

Zoology 5S 

Anatomy 62 

Physiology 62 

Pathology 63 

Graduate Courses in the School of Education 64 



NDIANA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



VOL. VIII BLOOMINGTON, IND., MAY 15, 1910 NO. 4 



Entered as second-class matter May 16, 1908, at the postoffice at Bloomington, 
Indiana, under the Act of July 16, 1894. Published from the University office, 
Hlooiniugton, Indiana, semi-monthly April, May, and June, and monthly January, 
February, March, July, September, and November. 



Prefatory Note 



The Indiana University, situated at Bloomington, In- 
diana, is the State University of Indiana and the head of 
the public school system of the State. It takes its origin 
from the State Seminaty, which was established by act of 
the Legislature, approved January 20, 1820. In 1828 the 
title of the Seminary was changed by the Legislature to 
that of the Indiana College ; and in 1838 the University 
was given its present name and style. In 1867 Indiana 
University became coeducational. 

The University consists at present of — 

The College of Liberal Arts, organized in 1828, 

The School of Law, organized in 1842, re-organized in 

1889, 
The School of Medicine, organized in 1903, 
The Graduate School, organized in 1904, 
The School of Education, organized in 1908. 

The first advanced degrees, conferred for graduate 
work, were granted in 1882. During the eighties, well de- 
cs) 



6 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

fined regulations for graduate work and graduate degrees 
were stated in the University catalogue, and a consider- 
albe number of graduate students were enrolled, especi- 
ally in the natural sciences. In the years 1882 to 1893, 
inclusive, the University graduated 14 Doctors of Phi- 
losophy, 99 Masters of Arts, and 12 Masters of Science. 
For some years following 1893, however, the degree 
Doctor of Philosophy was not conferred. 

In 1904 there took place a segregation and formal or- 
ganization of the Graduate School, and in 1908 the office 
of Dean of the Graduate School was created. 

This number of the Bulletin is devoted to setting forth 
the facilities for graduate work in the several Depart- 
ments of the University. Courses intended primarily for 
graduate students in the subject under consideration are 
described in full. Only skeleton announcements are given 
of courses intended for both graduates and undergradu- 
ates. For further description of the latter courses, see the 
bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or under that head- 
ing in the University catalogue. 

The attention of graduates of other Indiana colleges 
is invited to the announcement on a subsequent page of 
ten fellowships, recently established by the Board of Trus- 
tees, for such students. The value of these fellowships is 
$200 each; they also carry with them exemption from 
Contingent and Library fees. For further information 
concerning the Graduate School, address, 

The Dean of the Graduate School, 

Bloomington, Indiana, 



Officers and Faculty of the Graduate 
School 



COUNCIL 



Carl II EIGENMANN, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, Dean of the Gradu- 
ate School. 

Harold Whetstone Johnston, Ph.D., L.H.D., Professor of Latin. 

Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

Tlysses Grant Weathekly, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and 
Social Science. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psy- 
chology. 

* Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Albert Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

*Will David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Elmer Ellsworth Jones, Ph.D., Professor of History and Philosophy 
of Education. 

FACULTY 

William Lowe Bryan, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University. 

Horace Addison Hoffman, A.M., Professor of Greek. 

James Albert Woodburn, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of American His- 
tory and Politics. 

Carl H Eigenmann, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology, and Director of 
the Biological Station. 

Harold Whetstone Johnston, Ph.D., L.H.D., Professor of Latin. 

Robert Edward Lyons, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Arthur Lee Foley, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

David Myers Mottier, Ph.D., Professor of Botany. 



♦Absent on leave, from August 1, 1910. 

(7) 



8 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Albert Frederick Kuersteiner, Ph.D., Professor of Romance 
Languages. 

Ulysses Grant Weatherly, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and 
Social Science. 

Ernest Hiram Lindley, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Psy- 
chology. 

*Burton Dorr Myers, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

t Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of European History. 

Amos Siiartle Hershey, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science and 
International Law. 

Bert John Vos, Ph.D., Professor of German. 

William A Rawles, Ph.D., Professor of Political Economy. 

Carl Wilhelm Ferdinand Osthaus, A.M., Professor of German. 

Schuyler Colfax Davisson, Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

David Andrew Rothrock, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

William J Moenkhaus, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Louis Sherman Davis, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Warner Fite, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

fWiLL David Howe, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Ernest Otto Holland, A.B., Professor of Secondary Education. 

Augustus Grote Pohlman, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Henry Rihl Alburger, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

William Wesley Black, A.M., Professor of Elementary Education. 

Elmer Ellsworth Jones, Ph.D., Professor of the History and Phi- 
losophy of Education. 

Charles Jacob Sembower, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Edgar Roscoe Cumings, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

Royal Bronson Way, Ph.D., Acting Professor of History. 

George Davis Mobris, A.M., Associate Professor of French. 

Frank William Tilden, A.M., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Guiik) Hermann Stempel, A.M., Associate Professor of Comparative 
Philology. 

Charles Alfred Mosemiller, A.B., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages. 

Rolla Roy Ramsey, Ph.D., Associate Professor «>!' Physics. 

Oliver W Brown, A.M.. Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Prank Marion Andrews, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany 



'Absent on leave, Spring term, 15)10. 
fAbsent on leave, from August I, 15)10. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL \) 

Lillian Gay BeRBY, A.M.. Associate Professor of Latin. 

1Ii\i:y Tin w Stephenson, B.S., A.B., Associate Professor of 
English. 

Frank Aydelotte, A.M., B.Litt, Associate Professor of English. 

WlLBUB A.DELMAN CoGSiiAr.L. A.M., Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Geoboe Frederick Arps, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Educational 
Psychology. 

ULYSSES Siikrman Hanna. Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

Joshua William Beede, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology. 

*Edward Payson Morton, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 

EUGENE Leser, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German. 

James M Van Hook, A.M., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Frank Curry Mathers, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Clarence Earl May, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

DENNIS Emerson Jackson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Melyin Everett Haggerty, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy, 
and Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

Fkkxandus Payne, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Richard Ashley Rice, A.M., Acting Assistant Professor of English. 

Vernon Andrew Suydam, B.S., Instructor in Mechanics. 

Kenneth Powers Williams, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Clarence James Foreman, A.M., Instructor in Economics and Social 
Science. 

David Abbott Drew. A.M., Acting Instructor in Mechanics (1909-10). 



* Absent onlleave. 



General Statement of the Graduate School 



Purpose and Administration. The Graduate School 
furnishes opportunities for advanced work leading to 
careers in higher education and in certain lines of investi- 
gation. It does not offer work leading to professional 
degrees in Law or in Medicine. 

The work of the School is a direct continuation of that 
of the College of Liberal Arts, and as such is the most 
advanced work in education undertaken by the State. 
The Graduate School stands, therefore, at the head of the 
University, and is the culmination of the public school 
system of the State. 

The school is administered by the Council of the Grad- 
uate School. It is composed of members of the Faculty 
representing different fields of learning. 

Not all Departments of the University are at present 
equally equipped for extended graduate work. In recog- 
nition of this fact, the amount and nature of the graduate 
work offered by the different Departments varies. Some 
Departments offer work for the A.M. degree only, while 
others offer work leading to the degree of Ph.D. 

Admission. Students holding a bachelor's degree in 
Arts or Science from Indiana University, or the same de- 
gree or its equivalent from institutions of equal rank, are 
admitted to the Graduate School on presentation of the 
proper credentials. Persons holding the bachelor's de- 
gree from institutions whose requirements are considered 
to lack a year or more of being the equivalent of the A.B. 
from this institution, are not admitted to the Graduate 

(10) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 11 

School. They may enter the College of Liberal Arts and 
are referred to the Dean of the College for their standing. 
Holders of the A.B. or its equivalent from institutions 
whose requirements lack less than a year of being the 
equivalent of the A.B. from this institution, may be admit- 
ted to the Graduate School. In such cases, work in addi- 
tion to the minimum of forty-five hours for the degree, 
will be demanded. The amount will be determined in 
each case by the Council of the Graduate School. 

All graduate students will enroll at the beginning of 
each term, and those entering regularly organized classes 
will submit to the same regulations as undergraduate stu- 
dents. Work will in many cases be individual and not 
controlled by a recitation schedule. At the time of en- 
trance to the Graduate School the student must submit a 
plan of the entire work he wishes to present for the 
master's or doctor's degree. This plan must be approved 
by the professor of the major subject and the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

Fees. Students who are legal residents of the State of 
Indiana are charged a Contingent fee of five dollars a 
term, and a Library fee of one dollar a term, except in the 
School of Law, where the Library fee is five dollars. 

Beginning with the Summer term, 1910, students not 
legal residents of the State of Indiana will be charged a 
Contingent and Library fee amounting to twenty dollars 
a term. For each Summer half-term, half the fee will be 
charged. This fee is in lieu of the regular Library and 
Contingent fees noted above. 

These fees cover in part the cost of the physical main- 
tenance of the University, and are not applied to the cost 
of tuition, which is provided wholly by the State. 

3—23217 



12 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

The Laboratory fees in all courses are uniformly one 
dollar per credit hour, except in the courses of the School 
of Medicine, for which see separate announcement. 

The Gymnasium fee, if the work in physical training is 
taken, is one dollar a term. 

A Conditioned fee of five dollars a term is charged all 
students who have not, upon the records of the Univer- 
sity, credit in full for all entrance work. This rule ap- 
plies to both conditioned and special students with de- 
ficiencies in their entrance credit. It is provided, how- 
ever, that if a student enters the University with an en- 
trance condition of less than five hours, the fee will be 
refunded if the condition be removed in the first term of 
residence. 

An Examination fee of one dollar is charged for each 
make-up or special examination. This fee is paid to the 
Bursar, and his receipt when presented to the proper in- 
structor constitutes his authorization for holding the ex- 
amination. 

The fee for any Degree is five dollars, and must be paid 
to the Bursar at least thirty days before graduation, and a 
receipt for it filed with the Registrar. 

The Library. The Library of Indiana University at 
present contains seventy-four thousand catalogued vol- 
umes. The selection of these books has been made by ex- 
perts within the last twenty-five years with a view to 
facilitate instruction and research. The collection is 
a well-balanced one, and is especially strong in literary 
and scientific periodicals. The list of periodicals received 
and permanently kept on file by the library numbers about 
four hundred publications, including American, English, 
German, and French, and one each of Italian, Spanish, 
and Swedish. The library is made thoroughly usable by 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 13 

a carefully-made card catalogue, by indexes, and other 
bibliographical aids. The Library force consists of a li- 
brarian and ten assistants, all of whom are at the service 
of any authorized user of the library. 

In the library building are seminary rooms for the De- 
partments of History, Economics, English, Philosophy, 
Romance Languages, German, Education, Latin, and 
Greek. 

In addition to the central library, where the general, 
literary, and historical collections are housed, there are 
nine departmental collections, of varying sizes, kept in 
the different University buildings. 

All books, with the exception of periodicals and books 
reserved for reference, may be drawn for home use, each 
student having the privilege of drawing three books for 
two weeks. 

The Library is open Mondays to Fridays from 7 :45 
a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and Saturdays from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 
p.m. 

DEGREES 

Two advanced degrees, Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy, are conferred by the University. 

Master of Arts. The degree of Master of Arts may 
be conferred upon Bachelors of Arts of this University, or 
of any other institution of equivalent standing, following 
a residence at the University of a minimum of three full 
terras and the completion of a minimum of forty-five hours 
of University Credit. 

Less than a full term in residence will not be counted 
toward satisfying the residential requirements for the 
A.M. degree. There is no restriction in the amount of 
work that may be carried during any term. 



14 INDIANA UNIVEESITY 

Credits earned in excess of those required for the A.B. 
or B.S. degrees, before the degree is conferred or a certifi- 
cate of the completion of the work for the degree is issued, 
are not counted toward the A.M. degree. 

Thirty of the total of forty-five hours required for the 
degree A.M. must be in one Department, or in closely 
allied Departments. Fifteen hours must be distinctly 
graduate in character. 

Graduates of this University may be given leave of ab- 
sence for one term of the required year to pursue a specific 
investigation. 

The work for the A.M. degree may all be done in Sum- 
mer terms, with the reservation that the student must be 
in residence during three out of four successive Summer 
terms. Single half-terms will not be counted toward the 
residence requirement. 

Professional studies are not accepted for the graduate 
degrees, but research work on professional subjects may 
be accepted at the option of the professor in charge of the 
major subject. 

A thesis is required in all Departments except that of 
Latin. 

Doctor of Philosophy. The degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy may be conferred upon graduates of this Univer- 
sity, or of any institution of similar character and rank, 
upon the completion of an advanced course of study of not 
less than three years. 

Each candidate for this degree will select a major sub- 
ject consisting of the work of some one Department or 
recognized subdivision of a Department ; and not less 
than two minors, at least one of which must be in some 
related but different Department from that of the major 
subject. 



G KAMI! ATK SCHOOL 15 

The course U)v the degree will be pursued under the di- 
rection of a committee consisting of the heads of the De- 

partments in which the work is done. Its value will be 
determined by a final examination, and by the presenta- 
tion of a satisfactory thesis, usually embodying original 
work upon some prescribed or accepted subject, and which 
must always give evidence that the candidate is capable of 
forming an independent judgment upon the recent litera- 
ture of his Department. 

A detailed statement of the work offered for the de- 
gree, indorsed by the professor in charge of the major 
subject, must be submitted to the Council of the Graduate 
School, not later than May 10 of the year in which the 
candidate presents himself for examination. 

On the recommendation of the professor in charge of 
the major subject, and with the concurrence of the Coun- 
cil of the Graduate School, part of the three years' study 
required for this degree may be spent in residence at 
other universities. 

The thesis of every candidate for the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy shall be presented to the Council of the 
Graduate School on or before the first day of June of the 
year in which he proposes to take the degree. The thesis 
must be indorsed by the head of the Department as being 
in its final form, and ready for the press. If the candi- 
date is recommended for the degree, arrangements must 
be made to deposit five printed copies of the thesis in the 
library. 

Examinations of each candidate for this degree will be 
conducted by a committee consisting of all the instructors 
under whom graduate work has been taken, in the pres- 
ence of such members of the Faculty of the School as care 
to attend. 



16 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

At least one year before the final examination the can- 
didate shall satisfy the professor in charge of the major 
subject of his ability to use French and German for pur- 
poses of investigation. 

Application for Degrees. Application for the degree 
Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy must be filed with 
the Dean, at the time of admission to the Graduate School. 
Application for the degree Doctor of Philosophy must be 
on file at least one year before the candidate is admitted 
to the examination. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

Teaching- Fellowships. A number of teaching fellow- 
ships are available for graduate students. 

The Teaching Fellows are relieved from all term fees, 
and the fellowship carries with it an honorarium of be- 
tween $200 and $500 annually. The highest amount will 
ordinarily be paid only if the incumbent is appointed for 
a third year. A Teaching Fellowship is primarily a rec- 
ognition of scholarship. Not less than two-thirds of each 
Fellow's time must be devoted to work leading to the Doc- 
torate in Philosophy ; but he will be required also to give 
a portion of his time to the service of the Department in 
which he is appointed. 

A Fellow may be appointed for three separate years, 
but not for more. Appointments are for one year, and 
do not neerss-irily imply a reappointment. 

Donaldson Fellowship in Zoology. The Donaldson Fel- 
lowship in Zoology, with a value of $500, is open to stu- 
dents who are in large measure capable of doing inde- 
pendent work in biological subjects. The fellowship im- 
plies residence for twelve months at the cave farm of the 
University, at Mitchell, Endiana. A certain amount of 
supervising work is required of the incumbent. 



GBADUATE SCHOOL 17 

Lawrence Fellowship in Astronomy. The Lawrence 
Fellowship of the Department of Mechanics and As- 
tronomy has been established by Mr. Percival Lowell, of 
the Lowell Observatory, upon the following terms and 
conditions : 

1. The fellowship shall be known as the Lawrence 
Fellowship, in remembrance of the donor's mother, and is 
established in perpetuity, revocable, however, at any time 
at the will of the founder. 

2. It shall be annually available and shall cover the 
college calendar year, that is, from commencement to com- 
mencement of the same. 

3. The applicant shall be appointed by the Depart- 
ment, the donor reserving the right of final passing upon 
the suitability of the candidate so presented. 

4. The Fellow shall be given time and opportunity for 
an original thesis on some astronomical subject looking to 
the taking of a Master's degree, the nature of which shall 
be decided by the Director and the Fellow. But the Fel- 
low shall be expected to give general assistance in the 
observatory's work during the period of his fellowship. 

5. The Fellowship will pay $600 and the Fellow's 
traveling expenses to and from the Observatory at Flag- 
staff, Ariz. ; and a furnished room at the Observatory 
shall be free to the Fellow's use. 

Fellowships for Graduates of Other Indiana Colleges. 
The Trustees of Indiana University, at their March meet- 
ing, 1910, established ten Graduate Fellowships of an an- 
nual value of $200 each, with exemption from term fees, 
to be held by graduates of other colleges in the State of 
Indiana. In awarding these fellowships, the policy will 
be to assign them to the most promising students, irre- 



18 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

spective of the special field of study in which they wish to 
work, or the particular institutions from which they come. 
As between cases of equal merit, however, attention will 
be given to securing a distribution of the awards among 
different departments of study and different colleges of 
the State. 

Applicants for these fellowships must fill out a formal 
application blank, and file it with the Dean of the Gradu- 
ate School. This should contain a statement of the major 
subject which they wish to pursue, and be accompanied 
by a transcript of their college record, and such recom- 
mendations from their instructors and other evidences of 
fitness as they can offer. 

The applications will be referred in each case to the 
Department of the major subject, which will decide upon 
the respective merits of the applicants in that Department. 
On the basis of the departmental reports, the Graduate 
Council will then recommend to the Trustees the most 
eligible candidates for appointment. 

Holders of these fellowships will not ordinarily be 
eligible for reappointment, but will be eligible for appoint- 
ment to teaching fellowships. 

These fellowships are not open to students doing pro- 
fessional work in law or in medicine. 

Applications are received this year up to May 10th. 
In subsequent years applications must be filed by March 
15th. 

For application blanks, and further information, ad- 
dress the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Special Rule Concerning Fellows. Holders of fellow- 
ships are not permitted to accept remuneration for work 
done outside of the University, without special consent of 
the Graduate Council. 






University Organizations 



The Graduate Club. A graduate club was founded in 
1910 to establish closer relations among the graduate stu- 
dents and with the members of the faculty. Through the 
association of its members at the meetings, and the close 
acquaintanceships there gained, the club aims to foster a 
community of spirit and a solidarity of interest. The 
meetings are in part social, and in part devoted to the 
presentation of papers by members of the club, giving the 
results of some investigation carried on by the author. 
In this way, students in the different Departments are 
made acquainted with the special advanced work in vari- 
ous lines of research carried on in the University. Occa- 
sionally addresses will be given by visitors of educational 
prominence. Membership in the club is open to all grad- 
uate students. 

Sigma Xi. Sigma Xi is a somewhat similar organiza- 
tion, especially for scientific students. It is a chapter of 
a national scientific fraternity, to which members of the 
Faculty, graduate students, and Seniors may be elected. 
Its object is to encourage investigation in science, pure 
and applied. 

Departmental Clubs. The following Departments have 
special departmental clubs: Geology, Zoology, Physics, 
History, Philosophy, English, Mathematics, German, 
French, and Philology. Membership in these clubs is 
open to Faculty members of the Department, graduate 
students, and undergraduates. The purpose of the clubs 

4—23217 . (19) 



20 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

is to discuss topics of interest to members, and to pro- 
mote social intercourse. 

The Indiana Union. The Indiana Union is a social or- 
ganization of men, founded in 1909, with a charter mem- 
bership of nearly 400. Membership is open to all men stu- 
dents, to Faculty members, alumni, and to ex-students. 
The Union is governed by a board of directors of ten per- 
sons (eight students, one alumnus, and one Faculty mem- 
ber), and the five officers. Officers and directors are 
elected each year. Business meetings of the Union are 
held four times during the college year. 

The east wing of the Student Building is at present oc- 
cupied by the Union. On the first floor is a loung- 
ing room, a trophy corner, and a billiard hall. A 
large room on the second floor is used as a reading 
room, where all leading magazines, city papers, and coun- 
ty papers from various parts of the State are available 
to all men of the University. Accommodations for writ- 
ing will also be found in this room. Another of the rooms 
on the second floor is used by the officers and Board 
of Directors of the Union. The Union expects to make 
the rooms a place for students to spend their leisure time, 
in reading, getting acquainted with fellow students, and 
enjoying good, clean amusements. 

The plans of the Union contemplate the construction 
of a building for the exclusive use of its members. Either 
a wing to the Student Building, or a separate building on 
the campus, will probably be erected in the course of the 
next few years. The funds are to be raised by subscrip- 
tions from alumni, students, and friends. A reading 
room, swimming pool, billiard room, lobby, trophy room, 
and rooms for meetings, are among the things planned to 
!)<• included in the building. 



GBADUATE SCHOOL 21 

The Women's League. This is an organization to 
which all women of the University are eligible, and which 
has \\)v its purpose the furthering of social intercourse. 
Receptions, teas, and similar entertainments are given by 
n .it frequent intervals in the Student Building to its 
members and their friends. The wives of members of the 
Faculty take an active part in this work. 



Departments and Graduate Courses of 
Instruction, 1910-11 



*** In the following list are included many courses which are open alike to 
graduates and advanced underclassmen. Only a skeleton announcement of these is 
here made; for full description see the bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, or 
under that heading in the University catalogue. Strictly graduate courses are here 
described in full. The more elementary courses are not listed here at all. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 

Horace A. Hoffman, Professor. 
Frank W. Tilden, Associate Professor. 

The time that at the present may be profitably devoted 
to graduate work in Greek is one year, leading to the de- 
gree of A.M. A thesis on some subject connected with 
the seminary work of the year is required for the degree. 

All candidates for A.M., with Greek as major subject, 
must take at least fifteen hours in Latin, in advance of the 
Latin taken in the undergraduate study. 

Courses 9, 12, and 13, or any part of these courses, are 
also open as minors to graduate students who have not al- 
ready had as part of their undergraduate study the work 
which they take in their courses for graduate credit. 

The Department is well equipped for doing satis- 
factory work leading to the degree of Master of Arts. 
Besides the most important reference books, cyclopedias, 
dictionaries, lexicons, indexes, and standard editions of 
Greek writers, an effort has been made to build up an es- 
pecially good collection of works treating of Euripides, 
since seminary work is generally given in that author. 
The Department has the chief older editions as well as 

(22) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 23 

nearly all of the later ones, and many special works bear- 
ing on Euripides. 

The Library contains the most important classical 
journals, among them complete sets of 'The American 
Journal of Philology' ; 'The American Journal of Archae- 
ology'; 'The Classical Review'; Chicago, Cornell, and 
Harvard 'Studies'; 'Hermes'; 'Jahrbiicher fur classische 
Philologie'; ' Mitteilungen d. deutsch. arch. Inst, in 
Athen'; 'Philologus' ; 'Rheinisches Museum'; 'Journal 
of Hellenic Studies'. 

Among the most valuable works in the field of Archae- 
ology and Art the following may be named: 'Antike 
Denkmaler'; ' Ausgrabungen von Olympia'; 'Carapanos'; 
'Dodona'; Hamdey-Bey and Reinach's 'Necropole a 
Sidon'; Homolle's 'Fouilles de Delphes'; Ohnefalsch- 
Richter's 'Cypros, die Bibel und Homer'; Overbeck's 
'Griechische Kunstmythologie' ; Stackelberg's 'Die Gra- 
ber der Hellenen' ; Fenger's 'Dorische Polychromie' ; and 
the publications of the American and British Schools of 
Athens, and of the Egyptian Exploration Fund. Among 
the works on Inscriptions and Epigraphy the following 
may be mentioned: 'Corpus Inscriptionum Graecarum'; 
'Corpus Inscriptionum Atticarum'; 'Inscr. Graec. Sep- 
tentrionalis, Siciliae, Italiae, Pelopon., Insularum, etc.,' 
'Die Inschriften von Priene', and the important writings 
of such authorities as Klein, Kretschmer, Meisterhans, etc. 
For palaeography and the study of the papyri are the 
following: Works by Grenfell, Hunt, Kenyon, Mahaffy, 
Mayser, Mitteis, Thompson and Wilkin. In the import- 
ant field of vase-painting, the Library contains many valu- 
able works. Among the most noteworthy are : Benn- 
dorf's 'Griechische und Sicilische Vasenbilder' ; Colli gnon 
and Rayet's 'Histoire de la Ceramique grecque'; Deche- 



24 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

lette's 'lies Vases ceramiques ornes de la Gaule romaine' ; 
Furtwangler and Loeschke's 'Mykenische Vasen,' and 
'Mykenische Thongefasse' ; Furtwangler and Reichhold's 
'Griechische Vasenmalerei'; Harrison and McColl's 
'Types of Greek Vases,' and various books by Gardner, 
Huddilston, Klein, Kretschrner, Murray, Smith and 
Walters. 

The Department also owns upwards of 700 photo- 
graphs of landscapes, buildings, and works of art in 
Greece, Italy, and Sicily; and has many lantern-slides, 
busts, casts, a model of the Acropolis at Athens, and a 
series of reproductions of the famous Tanagra Figurines. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in 
the Department. The more elementary courses are not 
here listed; for these see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue : 

9. Lyric and Dramatic Poetry. Associate Professor Tilden. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, at 9 :00. 

12. Philosophical Prose. Professor Hoffman. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10 :00. 

13. Historical and Rhetorical Prose. Associate Professor Tilden. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10 :00. 

15c. Graduate Seminary. Euripides is the author usually studied, 
but other authors may be selected. In 1909-10 Plutarch's 
'Pericles' was made the basis of the work, and the portions 
of Thucydides and other authors bearing on the life and 
policies of Pericles were also studied. Professor Hoffman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, W., at hours to be appointed. 

156. Graduate Seminary: Aeschylus. In 1909-10 all the plays and 
fragments were studied, chiefly with a view to the religious 
and ethical ideas of Aeschylus. Associate Professor TlLDEN. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, F., at hours to be appointed. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 25 

DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

Harold W. Johnston, Professor. 

Lit. max (Jay BEBBT, Associate Professor. 

The graduate courses of the Department are intended 
to meet the wants of those making the teaching of Latin 
in schools and colleges their profession, whether or not 
they are candidates for a degree. The work of the first 
year (Courses 34 or 33, 41, and 42) consists chiefly of lec- 
tures and recitations. After the first year the work is to 
a great extent individual (Course 50), including, besides 
wide reading in authors of all periods, the first-hand in- 
vestigation of some subject selected with the approval of 
the Department. 

In the Summer term courses are offered for both gradu- 
ates and undergraduates. The work for the A.M. degree 
may be done in three summers. The undergraduate 
courses may be counted to satisfy the language require- 
ment for graduation in other departments, or as elective 
work, but may not be counted for graduation in Latin 
without the permission of the Department obtained in ad- 
vance. 

If Course 33 is taken in the undergraduate course, 
Course 34 should be made a part of the graduate work, 
and vice versa. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in 
the Department. The more elementary courses are not 
here listed; for these see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

33. Prose Writers of the Republic. Professor Johnston. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9 :00! 
Courses 33 and 34 are given in alternate years. 



26 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

[34. Poets of the Republic. Professor Johnston. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9:00.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

41. Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome. Recitations, lec- 

tures, and assigned readings. Associate Professor Berry. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be 

arranged. 
Platner, 'Ancient Rome.' 
Open to graduate students only. 

42. Readings in Latin Literature. The student will be guided and 

assisted in reading very considerable portions of those au- 
thors not included in other courses, with stress laid upon the 
subject matter rather than upon the language and style. An- 
alysis and summaries will be prepared by the student and 
criticized by the instructor. Professor Johnston and Asso- 
ciate Professor Berry. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be 
arranged. 

Open to graduate students only. 

43. Advanced Composition. This course is intended especially for 

teachers, but may be taken by any persons who need practice 
in writing Latin. Professor Johnston and Mr. Preston. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, once a week, at an hour to be 
arranged. 

Open to graduates and teachers of Latin. 

50. Seminary. The critical study of the text of some standard 
author, with incidental investigation of problems in syntax, 
style, prosody, and so forth. In past years Caesar, Sallust, 
Tacitus, and Plautus have been made the subjects of similar 
work. In 1910-11 it is proposed to make a study of Terence. 
The student should be provided with the critical edition of 
Umpfenbach and the text editions of Dziatzko and Fleck- 
eisen. Professor Johnston. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., 2 :00 to 3 :50. 

Open to students who have had one year's graduate work. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 27 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Albert P. Kuersteinek, Professor of Romance Languages. 
George D. Morris, Associate Professor of French. 
Charles A. Mosemiller, Associate Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

The Department of Romance Languages offers one year 
of graduate work, all in French. 

The Library is well equipped with works in French 
criticism. It contains all of the volumes of the 'Grands 
Ecrivains de la France' series published thus far, 
and complete sets of 'Romania,' 'Zeitschrift fur das 
Studium der Neueren Sprachen,' 'Zeitschrift fur fran- 
zosische Sprache und Litteratur,' 'Franzosische Studien,' 
'Revue des deux Mondes,' 'Revue de Cours et Confer- 
ences,' 'Biblioteca de Autores Espanoles,' besides a fair 
selection of works in French and Spanish literature. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students 
in the Department. The more elementary courses are not 
here listed; for those see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

7. Seventeenth Century Poetry and Drama. Professor Kuer- 

STEINER. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9 :00. 
[24. Eighteenth Century Poetry and Drama. Professor Kuer- 

STEINER. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

[10. Nineteenth Century : The Romantic Period. Associate Pro- 
fessor Morris. 
Fall, Wnter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10 :00.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. Courses 10 and 27 are given in alternate 
years. 
5—23217 



28 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

27. Nineteenth Century : The Realistic Period. Associate Pro- 
fessor Morris. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10 :00. 

32. Contemporary Literature. Associate Professor Morris. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10 :00. 

26. Advanced Composition. Associate Professor Mosemiller. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 2 :00. 

[28. Senior Composition. Associate Professor Mosemiller. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 3:00.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

13. Old French : Heading of texts ; study of Old French phonology 
and morphology ; exercises in tracing words from classical and 
from popular Latin to modern French ; brief survey of Old 
French literature. Lectures. Professor Kuersteiner. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 11:00. 

Paris, 'Extraits de la Chanson de Roland' ; Suchier, 'Aucassin 
et Nicolete' (French edition) ; Constants, 'Chrestomathie de 
l'ancien francais' ; Paris, 'La litterature frangaise au moyen- 
age'. 

Open to graduate students who have studied French and Latin. 

[11. Seventeenth Century Prose. A critical study of selections 
from 'L'Astree' of d'Urfe ; from Scarron's 'Roman Comique' ; 
from Furetiere's 'Roman Bourgeois' ; of Madame de la 
Fayette's 'La Princesse de Cleves' ; of selected letters of 
Madame de Sevigne ; of selections from Descartes's 'Dis- 
cours de la Methode' ; from Pascal's 'Pensees' ; from La 
Rochefoucauld's 'Maximes' ; from La Bruyere's 'Les Car- 
acteres' ; of Bossuet's funeral oration on Henriette d'Angle- 
terre. Collateral reading and reports. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8 :00.] 

Omitted in 1910-11. 

[25. Eighteenth Century Prose. A critical study of selections from 
Fontcnelle's 'La Plurality des Mondes' ; from Lesage's 'Gil 
Bias' ; from Marivaux's 'La Vie de Marianne' ; from Mon- 
tesquieu's 'Lettres Persanes' and 'L'Esprit des Lois'; from 
Voltaire's 'Histoire de Charles XII', and 'Candide', and from 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 29 

his correspondence ; of selections from Provost. Buff on, 
Bousseau, Diderot, and Bernardin de St. Pierre. Lectures. 
Associate Professor MOBBIS. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. M. W. F.. at 8:00.] 

Omitted in 1910-11. 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Bert J. Vos, Professor of German. 
Carl W. F. Osttiaus, Professor. 
Eugene Leser, Assistant Professor. 

In combination with the Department of Comparative 
Philology, which gives courses in Gothic, Old High Ger- 
man, and Old Norse, the Department at present offers 
about thirty-five hours of Graduate work. Students en- 
tering upon the graduate study of German must pre- 
viously have completed the courses required for a major 
in the Department, or their equivalent. Courses 27 and 
29 are, however, open to students of other departments 
than German upon the completion of the work of the 
Junior year. The library is well equipped with books for 
the special study of Classical and Nineteenth Century 
German literature. 

The list of complete sets of periodicals and of current 
publications received includes the following: 'Aleman- 
nia'; 'Allgemeine Zeitung' (Mlinchen) ; 'Archiv fiir das 
Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen ' : 'Arkiv 
fiir nordisk Filologi'; 'Beitrage zur Geschichte der 
deutschen Sprache und Literatur'; 'Bibliothek des lit- 
terarischen Vereins in Stuttgart'; ' Columbia University 
Germanic Studies': 'Das Litterarische Echo'; 'Eu- 
phorion ' ; ' Porschungen zur neueren Literaturgeschichte ' ; 
'German-American Annals'; 'Goethe Jahrbuch'; 'Indo- 



30 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

germanische Forschungen' ; 'Jahrbuch des freien deut- 
schen Hochstif ts ' ; 'Jahrbuch der Grillparzer Gesell- 
schaft'; 'Jahrbuch des Vereins fiir niederdeutsche 
Sprachforschung' ; ' Jahresbericht iiber die Erschein- 
ungen auf dem Gebiete der Germanischen Philologie'; 
' Jahresberichte fiir neuere deutsche Litteraturge- 
schichte'; 'Journal of English and Germanic Philology'; 
'Korrespondenzblatt des Vereins fiir niederdeutsche 
Sprachforschnng' ; 'Literaturblatt fiir germanische nnd 
romanische Philologie'; 'Modern Language Notes' 
'Modern Language Review'; 'Modern Philology' 
'Monatshefte fiir deutsche Sprache und Padagogik' 
'Publications of the Modern Language Association of 
America'; 'Quellen und Forschungen' ; ' Veroffentli- 
chungen des Schwabischen Schiller Vereins'; 'Zeitschrift 
des Allgemeinen deutschen Sprachvereins ' ; 'Zeitschrift 
des Vereins fiir Volkskunde'; 'Zeitschrift fiir Biicher- 
freunde'; 'Zeitschrift fiir deutsches Altertum'; 'Zeit- 
schrift fiir den deutschen Unterricht'; 'Zeitschrift fiir 
deutsche Mundarten'; 'Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Philolo- 
gie'; 'Zeitschrift fiir deutsche Wortforschung' ; 'Zeit- 
schrift fiir vergleichende Litteraturgeschichte'. 

For Gothic and Old High German, see Courses 4 and 
9 of the Department of Comparative Philology. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in 
the Department. The more elementary courses are not 
here listed; for these see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue : 

14. Gorman Usage. Assistant Professor Leser. 

Winter and Spring terms, T. Th., at an hour to be appointed. 

[21. Studies of flic recent German Dram:). Professor Osthaus.I 
Omitted in 1010-11. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 31 

LN. Journal Club. Tliis course is introductory to the work of the 
German Seminary. Members make reports upon the con- 
tents of current numbers of journals devoted to German 
literature and philology, and are trained in the use of im- 
portant works of reference. Two to five hours' credit. Pro- 
fessor Vos. 
Fall term, two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 

22. German Seminary : The Second Part of Goethe's 'Faust'. 

Conducted mainly in German. Two to five hours' credit. 

Professor Vos. 
Winter and Spring terms, two hours weekly, at an hour to be 

appointed. 
Open to students who have completed Course 28. 

27. Middle High German. Outline of the phonology, accidence and 
syntax. Reading of selections from the lyric poets, the popu- 
lar and court epic. Professor Vos. 
Fall and Winter terms, two hours weekly, at an hour to be 
appointed. 

29. History of the German Language. The relation of German to 
other Germanic languages ; the dialectic divisions of Modern 
German ; origins of the literary language ; changes since the 
middle period ; history of German orthography. Conducted 
partly in German. Professor Vos. 
Spring term, two hours weekly, at an hour to be appointed. 
Behaghel, 'Die deutsche Sprache' ('Das Wissen der Gegenwart', 
Band 54). 

DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE PHILOLOGY 

Guido H. Stempel, Associate Professor. 

The graduate courses offered below will be extended 
as required. They may be supplemented by certain of 
the courses listed as undergraduate, as well as by certain 
courses given in the other language Departments and in 
History, Social Science (anthropology), Philosophy, and 
English. The time that can profitably be spent here in 
graduate study in Philology is at present about two years. 



32 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

The more elementary courses of the Department are 
not here listed ; for these see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

[5. Comparative Philology of the Classical Languages. An ad- 
vanced course in the science of language and Indo-European 
philology. Each student will emphasize the particular lan- 
guage in which he has had special training. Associate Pro- 
fessor Stempel. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

Giles, 'Manual of Comparative Philology for Classical Stu- 
dents'. 

Open to students who have passed in Courses 2 and 3, and in 
thirty hours of language, and to advanced students in Latin 
or Greek.] 

Omitted in 1910-11. 

[4. Gothic. Grammar and reading ; phonology of the early Ger- 
manic languages. Associate Professor Stempel. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Primer of the Gothic Language'. 

Open to students who have passed in Course 2 and in thirty 
hours of language, and to others at the option of the in- 
structor. 

Given every third year; see Courses 9 and 10.] 

Omitted in 1910-11. 

9. Old High German. Elements of the grammar, reading of se- 
lected texts, study of dialectal divergence. The method will 
be both comparative and historical. Associate Professor 
Stempel. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

Wright, 'Old High German Primer'; Braune, 'Althochdeutsche 
Grammatik' ; Braune, 'Althochdeutsches Lesebuch'. 

Open to students on same conditions as Course 4. 

Given every third year, following Course 4 ; see Courses 4 
and 10. 

I 10. Middle High German. (1) Fall term : Elements of the gram- 
mar, reading of easy texts, and study of the development of 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 33 

the German language. (2) Winter and Spring terms: 

Xibelungenlied, with special study of the popular epic. As- 

sociate Professor Stempel. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 
Wright, "Middle High German Primer'; Paul, 'Mittelhoch- 

deutsche Grammatik' ; Robertson, 'Der arme Heinrich' ; 

Zarncke, 'Das Nibelungenlied'. 
Open to students on same conditions as Course 4.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. Given every third year, following Course 

1) ; see Courses 9 and 10. 

[11. Old Norse. Introduction to the language, and the reading of 
texts that throw light upon the popular literature of England 
and Germany. Associate Professor Stempel. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10 :00. 

Sweet, 'Icelandic Primer' ; selected texts. 

Open to students who have passed in fifteen hours of Germanic 
philology and to others at the option of the instructor.] 

Omitted in 1910-11. 

15. Seminary. Some topic in grammatical theory or the develop- 
ment of some English usage will be made the basis of study. 
Associate Professor Stempel. 
Fall, W T inter, and Spring terms, W., 2 :00 to 3 :50. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

*Will D. Howe, Professor of English. 

Charles J. Sembower, Professor of English. 

Henry T. Stephenson, Associate Professor of English. 

Frank Aydelotte, Associate Professor of English. 
♦Edward P. Morton, Assistant Professor of English. 

Richard A. Rice, Acting Assistant Professor. 

At present, two years may be spent with profit in pur- 
suing the work which will lead toward the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. The Library is equipped for re- 
search work in several periods, is well provided with the 
principal periodicals, and with the publications of most of 

♦Absent on leave, 1910-11. 



34 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

the learned societies. The instructors of the Department 
will direct competent advanced students in lines of inves- 
tigation and research. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students 
in the Department. The more elementary courses are not 
here listed; for these see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

33. Literary Criticism. Professor Sembower, and Associate Pro- 
fessor Aydelotte. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

35. Composition Seminary. Professor Sembower. Associate Pro- 
fessors Stephenson and Aydelotte. 

[41. The Anglo-Saxon Period.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

42. Chaucer. Associate Professor Aydelotte. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

[43. The Elizabethan Age (1557-1625).] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

9. Elizabethan Drama. Associate Professor Stephenson. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, at 10 :00. 

16. Shakspere. Associate Professor Aydelotte. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00. 

44. The Age of Milton and the Age of Dryden (1625-1700). Pro- 

fessor Sembower. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at an hour to be ap- 
pointed. 

45. The Eighteenth Century (1700-1770). Professor Howe. 
Fall term, daily, at 9:00. 

16. Topics of Romanticism (1770-1832). Assistant Professor Kick. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 11:00. 

|17. The Victorian Period (1832-1900).] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 35 

A graduate student in English may not include in his 
list of courses in English more than one-third selected 
from the courses named above. 

I 17. Metrics. A study of modern English meter.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

[50. Research Course in Anglo-Saxon Literature. An investigation 
of sources and authorities ; reading of Anglo-Saxon litera- 
terature. Prerequisite, Comparative Philology 2. Five 
hours of credit may be secured in this course each term.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

[51. Research Course in Middle English Literature. Reading of 
much prose, many romances, and some of the most important 
poems ; study of sources and relationship. It is expected 
that students who take this course will be able to read Mid- 
dle English, German, and French. Five hours of credit may 
be secured in this course each term.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

52. Elizabethan Literature. Studies in the various forms of litera- 

ture of the Elizabethan Age ; investigation of sources and re- 
lationships. The work may deal either with individual au- 
thors or special literary forms. A reading knowledge of 
German and French is required. Five hours of credit may 
be secured in this course each term. Associate Professors 
Stephenson and Aydelotte. 

53. Seventeenth Century Literature. A research course in the liter- 

ature from 3625-1700. Reading knowledge of German and 
French is required. Five hours of credit may be secured in 
this course each term. Professor Sembower. 

54. Eighteenth Century Literature. Studies in one of the fields of 

literature — the poetry, the drama, the essay, or the novel. 
Reading knowledge of German and French is required. Five 
hours of credit may be secured in this course each term. 
Professor Howe and Assistant Professor Rice. 



36 INDIANA UNIVEKSITY 

55. Research Studies in the Literature of the Nineteenth Century. 
Discussion of the various literary forms and study of the re- 
lationship between English and contemporary European lit- 
erature. Reading knowledge of German and French is re- 
quired. Five hours of credit may be secured in this course 
each term. Professors Howe and Sembower. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 

James A. Woodburn, Professor of American History and Politics. 
* Samuel B. Harding, Professor of European History. 
Amos S. Hershey, Professor of Political Science and International 

Law. 
Royal Bronson Way, Acting Professor of History. 
Thomas L. Harris, Instructor. 

The Department is prepared to offer research work 
leading to the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, in the following 
fields : American Colonial History, the American Civil 
War and Reconstruction, English History in the Seven- 
teenth and Nineteenth Centuries, the French Revolution, 
Diplomatic History, Political Philosophy, and Interna- 
tional Law. In each of these fields good library collec- 
tions are already at hand, to which constant additions are 
being made. 

The following are among the periodicals and continua- 
tion sets at the disposal of advanced students of history 
and political science : 

American Historical Association, Annual Reports, 1884- 

American Historical Review, 189G- 

American Journal of International Law, 1907- 

American Magazine of Civics, 1894-6. 

American Political Science Review, 1905- 

Annales des Sciences Politiques, 1899- 



_2 *Absent on Leave, from August, l, 1910. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 37 

Annals of the American Academy of Political Scieme, 1890- 

Annuahv I Iistorique. 1810-50. 

Annual Register, 1891-1828. 

Archives Diplomatiques, 1905- 

Oamden Miscellany, 1847- 

Camden Society Publications, 1838- 

Columbia University Studies in History, Economics, and Public Law, 

1891- 
Cyclopedic Review of Current History, 1893-1902. 
DeBow's Review. 1846-68. 
English Historical Review, 1S89- 

Historical Manuscripts Commission Reports (Great Britain), 1870- 
Gulf States Historical Magazine, 1902-04. 
Hansard's Parliamentary Debates, 1812-1897. 
Harvard Historical Studies, 1896- 
Historische Zeitschrift, 1888- 
Iowa Journal of History and Politics, 1903- 
Johns Hopkins T T niversity Studies in History and Political Science, 

1883- 
Magazine of American History, 1880-93. 
Niles' Weekly Register, 1811-49. 
Political Science Quarterly, 1886- 
La Revolution Frangaise, 1899- 

Revue de Droit International et de Legislation Comparee, 1896- 
Revu Gengrale de Droit International Publique, 1894- 
Revue Historique. 1895- 

Revue Politique et Litteraire : Revue Bleue. 1880- 
Royal Historical Society Transactions. 3d series, 1907- 
South Atlantic Quarterly, 1903- 
London Times (weekly ed.), 1896-7; 1901- 
University of Missouri Studies, 1901- 
University of Pennsylvania Publications : Series in Political Economy 

and Public Law, 1889- 
University of Wisconsin Bulletin : Economics, Political Science, and 

History series, 1894-99. 
Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 1894- 
William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, 1902- 
Zeitschrift fur Volkerrecht und Bundesstaatsrecht, 1906- 



38 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Candidates for the degree Ph.D., with History as major 
subject, will be examined on each of the following fields : 
(1) Ancient History, with emphasis at the option of the 
candidate in either Greek or Roman History ; (2) Medi- 
aeval and Modern History, with emphasis in either the 
mediaeval or the modern field; (3) English History, with 
emphasis either on the period before 1485, or after that 
date ; and (4) American History, with chief emphasis 
either on the period before 1783, or after that date. The 
examination on the special field of the thesis will natu- 
rally be more searching than elsewhere. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students 
in this Department. The more elementary courses are 
not here listed ; for these see the bulletin of the College 
of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue : 

6. English History. Mr. Harris. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

9. Renaissance and Reformation. Professor Way. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 9 :00. 

22. American Diplomatic History. Professor Way. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8 :00. 

23a. Government and Parties of England. Professor Hersiiey. 
Fall term, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 

236. Government and Parties of Continental Europe. Professor 
Hebshet. 
Winter term, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 

24. History of Political Ideas and Theory of the State. Professor 
Hebshey. 
Spring term. M. W. F., at 11 :00. 

[13. France in the Middle Ages. A study of the institutions of 
mediaeval France, and of the processes whereby the feudal 
type of society was transformed into the modern stale. Leo- 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 39 

tares, collateral reading, and reports on assigned topics. 

Professor Harding. 
Fall and Winter terms, T. Th., at 11 :00.J 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

| 1(5. Historical Method. The principles of historical investigation, 
with some practice in the use of sources and the preparation 
of papers. Professor Handing. 

Spring term, T. Th., at 9 :00. 

Langlois and Seignohos, 'Introduction to the Study of History'.] 

Omitted in 1910-11. 

28. American Political Discussions. A study of some of the more 

notable contributions to political and constitutional contro- 
versies in the national period of American history. Designed 
to introduce the student to a first-hand knowledge of the 
materials relating to the leading issues in our national de- 
velopment. Professor Woodburn. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 9 :00. 

29. History of the West. A study of the westward movement in 

America, the advance of the frontier, western state-making, 
the character of western migration, trade movements and 
nationalizing influences. Professor Way. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10 :00. 

1 20a. Seminary in English History. Individual research work, under 
the guidance of the instructor, on some subject connected 
with modem English history. The results of the investiga- 
tions are presented from time to time as reports and are 
finally embodied in papers in form suitable for publication, 
of which a copy must be left with the Seminary. Professor 
Harding. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Hours for individual confer- 
ence to be arranged.] 

Omitted in 1910-11. 

20c. Seminary in American Constitutional and Political History. In 
1909-10 the period of the Civil War was studied. Study of 
the sources, reports of investigations, and thesis work. Pro- 
fessor Woodburn. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 4 :00 to 5 :30. 

Open to advanced students and graduates. 



40 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

20d. Seminary in International Law and Diplomacy. Research work 
and the special study of important topics, more especially of 
present day problems. During recent years such subjects 
were selected as the Alabama Claims, the Panama Affair, 
the causes of the Russo-Japanese War, the 'Open Door' 
policy in China, and the genesis of the Monroe Doctrine. 
Professor Hershey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL 
SCIENCE 

Ulysses G. Weatherly, Professor of Economics and Social Science. 
William A. Rawles, Professor of Political Economy. 
Clarence J. Foreman, Instructor. 

The Department library is equipped with full sets of 
the most important public documents, both state and na- 
tional, and has complete sets of most of the American, 
English, French, and German economic periodicals. Ad- 
vanced students have direct access to these materials, and 
also to the special collections relating to charitable and 
correctional institutions. The Department is affiliated 
with the Charity Organization Society of Indianapolis, 
and through this means properly qualified students are 
enabled to come into direct contact with the social and 
economic problems of that city. Constant use is also 
made of the statistical materials in the various depart- 
ments of the State government, and also in the State Li- 
brary. 

The more elementary courses of the Department are 
not here listed; for these see the bulletin of the College 
of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 41 

The following courses are designed to furnish the work 
for ilif Master's degree. In certain cases a second year 
of graduate study may be taken with advantage. 

C>. Money, Hanking, and the Money Market. Professor Kawles. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 

3. Public Finance. Professor Rawles. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 8 :00. 

9. Transportation. Professor Rawi.es. 
Spring term, M. W. F., at 9 :00. 

5. Advanced Political Economy. Mr. Foreman. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 11 :00. 

20. Ethnology. Professor Weatherly. 
Fall term, T. Th., at 10:00. 

21. Comparative Sociology : The problem of the family. Professor 

Weatherly. 
Winter term, T. Th., at 10 :00. 

23. Demography of the United States. Professor Weatherly. 
Spring term, T. Th., at 10 :00. 

4a. Social Pathology : Pauperism and charities. Professor Weath- 
erly. 
Fall term, M. W. F., at 10 :00. 

4b. Social Pathology. Crime and penology. Professor Weath- 
erly. 
Winter term, M. W. F., at 10 :00. 

4c. Social Pathology : Special problems. Professor Weatherly. 
Spring term, M. W. F., at 10:00. 

10. Socialism and Social Reform. Professor Weatherly. 
Fall term, T. Th., at 11 :00. 

8. Seminary in Economics and Sociology. Professors Weatherly 
and Rawles, and Mr. Foreman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week, at an hour 
to be appointed. 



42 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

8a. Research. Special investigations upon economic or sociological 
subjects, directed toward the preparation of theses for the 
Master's degree. Hours and credit by individual arrange- 
ment. Professors Weathekly and Rawles, and Mr. Fore- 
man. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Ernest H. Lindley, Professor of Philosophy and Psychology. 
Warner Fite, Professor of Philosophy. 
William L. Bryan, Lecturer on Ethics. 

Melvin E. Haggerty, Assistant Professor and Director of the Psycho- 
logical Laboratory. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in 
the Department. The more elementary courses are not 
here listed ; for these see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

34. Psychological Seminary. Professor Lindley and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Haggerty. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week. 

[35. Modern Idealism. Professor Fite. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10:00.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

36. Advanced Logic and Methods of Science. Professor Fite. 

Fall and Winter terms, two hours once a week at a period to be 
arranged. 

5. Advanced Psychology. Professor Lindley or Professor Fite. 
Pall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 

[30. Seminary in Philosophy. A course designed to aid advanced 
students in the investigation of philosophical problems. The 
subject for 1909-10 was problems of contemporary phi- 
losophy. Professor LlNDLEY. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two hours a week.] 

Omitted in 1910-11. 






GKADUATE SCHOOL 43 

s . Psychological Research. Work arranged with individual stu- 
dents. Professor Lindley and Assistant Professor Hag- 

GERTY. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Schuyler C. Davisson, Professor. 
David A. Rothrock, Professor. 
Ulysses S. Hanna, Associate Professor. 
Kenneth P. Williams, Instructor. 

The graduate .courses at present offered in the Depart- 
ment require about three years for their completion. 

The library of the Department, consisting of about 
2,200 bound volumes, is located in Room 36, Wylie Hall. 
The library is open from 8 :00 a.m. to 10 :00' p.m., for use 
by students pursuing advanced work in mathematics. 
The collection of mathematical books consists of the more 
important English, French, and German texts, the col- 
lected works of Abel, Bernoulli, Cauchy, Cayley, Clifford, 
DeMorgan, Gauss, Jacobi, Lagrange, Lie, Mobius, Rie- 
mann, Schwartz, Smith, Steiner, and Weierstrass, to- 
gether with the following sets of periodicals: 

Acta Mathematica. Stockholm, Berlin, Paris. 1882 to date. 

American Journal of Mathematics. Baltimore. 1878 to date. 

American Mathematical Monthly. Springfield, Mo. 1884 to date. 

Analyst (The). Des Moines, la. 1874-1883. Complete. 

Annali di Matematica. Milan. Current numbers. 

Annals of Mathematics. Charlottesville, Va., and Cambridge, Mass. 

1884 to date. 
Annales scientifiques de l'Ecole Normale Superieure. Paris. 1864 to 

date. 
Archiv der Mathematik und Physik. Leipzig. 1841 to date. 
Bibliotheca Mathematica. Leipzig. Current numbers. 
Bulletin de la Soci6te mathematique de France. Paris. 1872 to date. 



44 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Bulletin des Sciences mathematique. Paris. Current number*. 
Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society. New York. 1894 to 

date. 
Bulletin of the New York Mathematical Society. New York. 1891- 

1894. Complete. 
Cambridge Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 1837-1845. Complete. 
Cambridge and Dublin Mathematical Journal. Cambridge. 1846- 

1854. Complete. 
Educational Times (Mathematical Reprints from the). London. 

1803 to date. 
Giornale di Matematiche. Naples. 1862 to date. 
Jahrbuch iiber die Fortschritte der Mathematik. Berlin. 1868 to 

date. 
Jahresbericht der deutschen Mathematiker-Yereinigung. Leipzig. 

1892 to date. 
Journal de l'Ecole Polytechnique. Paris. Current numbers. 
Journal de Mathmematiques pures et appliquees (Liouville). Paris. 

1836 to date. 
Journal fur die reine und angewandte Mathematik (Crelle), Berlin. 

1826 to date. 
L'Enseignement mathematique. Paris. Current numbers. 
Mathematical Monthly (The). Cambridge, Mass. 1859-1861. Com- 
plete. 
Mathematical Magazine. Washington. 1882-1884. 
Mathematical Gazette. London. 1896 to date. 
Mathematical Messenger (The). Ada, Louisiana. 1887-1894. 
Mathematical Review. Worcester. 1896-1897. Complete. 
Mathematical Visitor. Erie, Pa. 1877-1883. Complete. 
Mathematische Annalen. Leipzig. 1869 to date. 
Methesis. Ghent. 1881 to date. 
Messenger of Mathematics (The Oxford, Cambridge and Dublin). 

Cambridge. 1862-1871. Complete. 
Messenger of Mathematics (The)- London and Cambridge. 1872 to 

date. 
Monatshefte fur Mathematik und Physik. Vienna. Current numbers. 
Nachrichten von der Koniglichen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften zu 

Gftttingen. Gottingen. 1873 to date. 
Xoiivc'lles Annales de Mai homatiques. Paris, Current numbers. 






GRADUATE SCHOOL 45 

Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society. Edinburgh. 

1383 to date. 
Pro eedings of the London Mathematical Society. London. 18(35 to 

date. 
Quarterly Journal of Mathematics, Pure and Applied. London. 1857 

to date. 
Uendiconti del Circolo Matematico di Palermo. Palermo. 1884 to 

date. 
Revue de Mathematiques Speciales. Paris. Current numbers. 
Revue Semestrielle des Publications mathematiques. Amsterdam. 

1893 to date. 
Transactions of the American Mathematical Society. New York. 

1900 to date. 
Zeitschrift fur Mathematik und Physik. Leipzig. Current numbers. 
Zeitschrift fur mathematischen und naturwissenschaftlichen Unter- 

richt. Leipzig. Current numbers. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in 
the Department. The more elementary courses are not 
here listed; for these see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

33. Fourier's Series and Fourier's Integrals. Four hours' credit. 
Professor Davisson. 
Fall and Winter terms, T. Th., at a time to be appointed. 

50. Systems of Geometry. Six hours' credit. Professor Rothrock. 
Fall and Winter terms, at a time to be appointed. 

20. Mathematical Reading and Research. Professors Davisson and 
Rothrock, and Associate Professor Hanna. 

[30. Theory of Surfaces. Lectures, assigned readings, and reports 
upon the general theory of surfaces and twisted curves ; sin- 
gularities of surfaces, asymptotic curves, lines of curvature, 
geodesic lines, and differential geometry are studied. Pro- 
fessor Davisson.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 



46 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

21. Functions of a Complex Variable. The fundamental operations, 
conformal representation, stereographic projection and map- 
ping upon the Riemann sphere, many-valued functions, Rie- 
mann surfaces. Lectures and reports. Six hours' credit. 
Professor Rothrock. 

Summer term 1911, at a time to be appointed. 

Prerequisite, Courses 10 and 13. 

49. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics. A course dealing with 
the foundations of mathematics. Lectures and reports. 
Two hours' credit. Professor Davisson. 
Spring term, T. Th., at an hour to be appointed. 

[23. Invariants and Covariants. A general study of algebraic forms 
with special reference to invariants, covariants and canonical 
forms. Four hours' credit. Associate Professor Hanna. 1 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

45. Calculus of Variations. Six hours' credit. Professor Roth- 
rock. 
Spring and Summer terms (1911), at hours to be appointed. 

[32. Theory of Numbers. Linear congruences, proofs of the law of 
quadratic reciprocity, the analytic and geometric theories of 
forms, etc. Three hours' credit. Associate Professor 
Hanna.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

39. Theory of Groups and Substitutions. An elementary course 

dealing with the fundamental theorems preparatory to Course 
40. Three hours' credit. Associate Professor Hanna. 
Winter term, at hours to be appointed. 

40. The Galois Theory of Functions. A continuation of Course 39; 

both courses based on Bianchi's 'Leziono sull Teoria dei 
Gruppi di Sostituzioni'. Three hours' credit. Associate 
Professor Hanna. 
Spring term, at hours to be appointed. 

43. Bessel, Laplace and Lame Functions. Four hours' credit. Mr. 
Williams. 
Fall and Winter terms at hours l<> be appointed. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 47 

Vector Analysis. A study of the algebraic, differential, and in- 
tegral properties of vectors. Special emphasis will be laid on 
the physical interpretation and application of vectors. Three 
hours' credit. Mr. Williams. 

Spring term, at hours to be appointed. 



DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICS AND 
ASTRONOMY 

Wilbur A. Cogshall, Associate Professor of Astronomy. 
Yiunon A. Suydam, Instructor in Mechanics. 

David A. Drew, Acting Instructor in Mechanics and Astronomy 
(1909-10). 

Kirkwood Observatory, completed in 1900, is occupied 
by the Department. The building contains a library and 
computing room ; a lecture room ; dark room ; a transit 
room, in which is a Bamberg universal instrument, a How- 
ard sidereal clock, a mean time chronometer, and a chro- 
nograph; a dome twenty-six feet in diameter; and a room 
of the same size immediately below. In the dome is the 
refracting telescope, of which the 12-inch objective is by 
Brashear, and the mounting by Warner and Swasey, of 
Cleveland. The instrument has a focal length of about 
15 feet, and is supplied with eyepieces magnifying from 
130 to nearly 1,000 diameters ; also with polarizing helio- 
scope, diagonal eyepiece, and an electrically illuminated 
micrometer ; there are both coarse and fine circles in right 
ascension and declination, the fine circles having reading 
microscope and electrical illumination. 

The Department has in a separate building, a mount- 
ing, designed and built by the Department, that carries a 
4-inch Browning refractor, a 5-inch portrait lens and an 
8-inch parabolic mirror, for the photography of comets, 
nebulae, etc. 



48 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

Another building contains a coelostat and horizontal 
telescope. The objective of the telescope has a diameter 
of 9 inches and a focal length of 64 feet. Both the plane 
of the coelostat and the lens are by Petitdidier, of Chicago. 

For an account of the Lawrence Fellowship in As- 
tronomy, see page 17. 

The Department receives telegraphic bulletins of dis- 
coveries made at American and European observatories. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students 
in the Department. The more elementary courses are not 
here listed; for these see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

14. Orbits of Spectroscopic Binaries. Associate Professor Cogs- 

hall. 
Winter term, T. Th., at 2 :00. 

S. Theoretical Mechanics. Mr. Suydam. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring- terms, M. W. F., at 9 :00. 

15. Celestial Mechanics. An introductory course. Associate Pro- 

fessor Cogshall. 
Spring term, M. AV. F., at 11 :00. 
Open to students who have passed in Course 7. 

12. Theoretical Astronomy. Integration of equations of motion ; 

computation of orbits and ephernerides. Associate Professor 
Cogshall. 
Fall term. Hours and credit to be arranged with each student. 

13. Astronomical Research. A limited number of students will be 

permitted to undertake research work under the supervision 
of the Department. The equipment is best suited for work 
in astronomy of precision and celestial photography. Asso- 
ciate Professor COGSHALL. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. I lours and credil arranged 
with each st udent. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 49 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Arthur L. Foley, Professor of Physics. 

Rolla R. Ramsey. Associate Professor of Physics. 

The Department offers a full course leading to the de- 
gree of Ph.D. 

The supply of apparatus for the presentation of 
courses in modern experimental physics is fairly com- 
plete. The equipment and facilities for work have been 
largely increased during the past three years, especially 
in the way of delicate instruments and accurate standards 
for advanced study. 

The Library of the Department of Physics contains 
about six hundred volumes, exclusive of sets of several 
journals. The following magazines are on file: 'Annalen 
der Physik', 'Annales de Chemie et de Physique', 'Bei- 
blatter zu den Annalen der Physik', 'Physikalische Zeit- 
schrift', 'The Electrical World and Engineer', 'The Elec- 
trician' (London), 'Journal de Physique', 'The Philosoph- 
ieal Magazine'. 'The Physical Review', 'The Proceedings 
of the Physical Society of London', 'The Proceedings of 
the Royal Society'. 'Le Radium', 'School Science and 
Mathematics'. 'Science Abstracts' (A and B), 'Scientific 
American and Supplement', 'The Western Electrician', 
'Cassier's Magazine', and 'The Manual Training Maga- 
zine'. Students have access also to the journals on file 
in the general library, and in the libraries of other De- 
partments. Of these may be named: 'The American 
Journal of Science', 'The Astrophysical Journal', 'The 
Engineering and Mining Journal', 'The Engineering 
Magazine', 'Nature', 'Comptes Rendus', and 'Science'. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in 



50 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

the Department. The more elementary courses are not 
here listed; for these see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

12. The Electromagnetic Theory of Light. Professor Foley. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 9 :00. 
Wood, 'Optics'. 

13. Advanced Mathematical Electricity. Associate Professor Ram- 

sey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 
Webster, 'Electricity and Magnetism'. 

34. Sound. Mathematical and physical properties of the vibration 
of sound-producing bodies, such as strings, rods, plates, air 
columns, membranes, etc. Assistant Professor Dutcher. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 10 :00. 

16b. Laboratory Practice in Spectroscopy and Photometry. Asso- 
ciate Professor Ramsey. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 2 :00. 

14. Advanced Laboratory Methods and Research. Professor 

Foley. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, at 1 :00. 

22. Current Physical Literature. Professor Foley. 

Two hours a week throughout the year, at an hour to be ap- 
pointed. 

30. Advanced Theoretical Physics. A critical study of standard 
treatises and memoirs. Professor Foley. 
Two hours per week, at a time to be appointed. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 51 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Robert E. Lyons, Professor. 

Louis S. Davis, Professor. 

Oliver W. Brown, Associate Professor. 

Frank C. Mathers, Assistant Professor. 

Clarence E. May, Assistant Professor. 

The Department of Chemistry has general, special, and 
private laboratories, a library room, a lecture room, bal- 
ance rooms, an incubator room, a stock room, museum, etc. 
Special laboratories are provided for electrochemistry, 
assaying and electric furnace work, organic, inorganic 
and physiological chemistry, water and gas analysis, spec- 
troscopic analysis. The laboratories comprise eleven large, 
well-lighted rooms, equipped with workstands, capable of 
accommodating two hundred and seventy-five students. 
Each room is provided with fume hoods and air registers 
connected with a ventilating fan for the removal of offen- 
sive and poisonous gases. 

The general equipment for graduate work, including 
laboratory and library facilities, has been materially in- 
creased during the past year. A laboratory for electro- 
metallurgy has been installed and fully equipped. 

Special attention is given to inorganic, organic, physi- 
ological, physical and electro chemistry, technical analyt- 
ical chemistry, and electro-metallurgy. 

The graduate work of the Department, leading to the 
degree A.M. and Ph.D., comprises advanced laboratory, 
lecture, library and seminary work in the lines indicated 
above, and special graduate courses described below. A 
thesis embodying original investigation is required for an 
advanced degree. 



52 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

The laboratories for advanced work and the depart- 
mental library are open from 8 :00 a.m. to 5 :00 p.m. 
There are no classes in the laboratories; each student 
works independently. A five-hour laboratory course re- 
quires two and one-half actual hours of laboratory work 
daily. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students in 
this Department. The more elementary courses are not 
here listed ; for these see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

19, Physical Chemistry- Laboratory work. Associate Professor 
Brown and Mr. Gamble. 

22. Electrochemistry. Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Gamble. 
Winter term. A. Lectures, T. Th., at 8 :00. B. Laboratory, 

M. W. F., 1 :00 to 4 :50. 

23. Electrochemistry. Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Gam- 

ble. 
Spring term. A. Lectures, T. Th., at 8 :00. B. Laboratory, 
M. W. F., 1 :00 to 4 :50. 

29. Storage Batteries. Lecures and laboratory work. Associate 
Professor Brown and Mr. Gamble. 
Fall term. 

13. Elementary Metallurgy and Assaying. Lectures and laboratory 
work. Associate Professor Brown and Mr. Gamble. 
Fall term. Lectures, T. Th., at S :00 ; laboratory work, F. S., 
8 :00 to 11 :50. 

If). Advanced technical nod engineering analysis. Laboratory work. 
Assistant Professor MATHERS. 
Spring term, daily. 

.';_!. Gas and Fuel Analysis. Lectures and laboratory work. Assist- 
ant Professor Mathebs. 
Wint< r << mi, three hours a week. 



(ii; LDTJATE SCHOOL 53 

Spectrum Analysis and Sugar Analysis. Lectures and labora- 
tory work. Assistant Professor MATHERS. 
Fall term, two hours a week. 

LV». Chemical Engineering. Associate Professor Brown. 
Fall term. Lectures. M. W. F., at 8:00. 

14. Seminary. Reports on current literature and special topics. 
(1) Fall term: Inorganic Chemistry. Assistant Professor 
MATHERS. (2) Winter term: Organic Chemistry. Pro- 
fessor Lyons and Assistant Professor May. (3) Spring 
term : Electro- and Industrial Chemistry. Associate Pro- 
fessor Brown and Assistant Professor May. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, Th., at 7 :00 p.m. 

]-a. Research in Organic or Physiological Chemistry. Professor 
Lyons and Assistant Professor May. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8 :00 to 5 :00. 

126. Research in the Chemistry of the Alkaloids. Professor Davis. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8 :00 to 5 :00. 

12c. Research in Physical and Electrochemistry- Associate Professor 
Brown. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 5:00. 

12f/. Research in Inorganic Chemistry. Assistant Professor Math- 
ers. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 8 :00 to 5 :00. 

18c. Advanced Physical Chemistry. Lectures on selected chapters of 
Physical chemistry. Associate Professor Brown, 
Spring term, T. Th., at an hour to be arranged. 

24. Advanced Electrochemistry and Electro-metallurgy. (A) Ad- 
vanced laboratory work and research in pure and applied 
electrochemistry and electro-metallurgy, including investiga- 
tions in electric furnace work, refining and extraction of 
metals, electro-synthesis of organic and inorganic compounds, 
manufacture of storage batteries, and of industrial electro- 
chemical processes. (B) Lectures on the design and opera- 
tion of commercial electric furnaces and on electric furnace 



54 INDIANA UNIVEKSITY 

processes and products. Associate Professor Brown and 

Mr. Gamble. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. Laboratory work, daily, 8 :00 

to 4 :50 ; lectures, Winter term. F., at 8 :00. 
Students in this course are recommended to take Physics 10 

and 24. 

25. Advanced Organic Chemistry. A continuation of Course 6. 

(A) Lectures and recitations on selected chapters of organic 
chemistry. The topics considered in 1910 were: (a) The 
radical, (b) benzene nucleus, (c) stereoisomerism of car- 
bon, (d) sugars, purins, proteins, terpenes and alkaloids. 

(B) Laboratory work or research in synthetic or analytical 
organic chemistry. Assistant Professor May. 

(A) Winter and Spring terms, T. Th.. 11:00. (B) Fall, 
Winter, and Spring terms, daily, S :00 to 4 :50. 

Cohen, 'Text Book of Organic Chemistry' ; Koscoe and Schor- 
lemer, 'Treatise on Chemistry' ; Hammersten, 'Physiological 
Chemistry' ; Hensler-Pond, 'Terpenes'. 

Presupposes Courses 6\ 6 2 , 7. 

31. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Laboratory work. The prep- 
aration and study of the properties and reactions of the dif- 
ferent compounds of the rare and uncommon elements, fol- 
lowed by research. This includes a review of the literature 
relating to the element that is being studied. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Mathers. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. P., 8 :00 to 4 :. r >0. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 

Edgar R. Cumings, Professor. 
Joshua W. Beede, Associate Professor. 

The work offered by the Department leading to the 
Ph.D. degree consists largely of research. Courses 10 and 
13 are entirely of this nature. The problems offered for 
investigation are confined for the most part to strati- 
graphic geology and paleontology, although several 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 55 

studios in economic and geographic geology have been 
successfully prosecuted by students in the past. 

In stratigraphic geology the subjects covered by the 
researches of the Department have been concerned chiefly 
with the Ordovician and Mississippian rocks of Indiana, 
and with the Permian and Upper Carboniferous rocks of 
Kansas. Oklahoma and Texas. In pure paleontology the 
Department is especially equipped for the study of 
problems in the development of Paleozoic Brachiopoda 
and Bryozoa, and considerable work has already been 
published in this field. 

For the prosecution of researches along the lines indi- 
cated above, the Department is adequately equipped. 
The collections of fossils are especially rich in material 
from the Ordovician, Silurian and Mississippian of Indi- 
ana, and the Upper Carboniferous and Permian of Kansas. 
The latter collections are among the best in America. A 
special feature of the collections is the wealth of screen- 
ings containing immature stages of Brachiopoda, Bryozoa, 
etc. 

The laboratory equipment contains the usual apparatus 
for the preparation of material, and machinery for cut- 
ting, grinding, and polishing thin sections of fossils. An 
enlarging camera, with special lighting appliances and 
combinations of lenses for a wide range of work, is avail- 
able as an aid in the proper illustration of paleontological 
material. 

The Department receives the following periodicals : 
'Geological Magazine', 'Quarterly Journal of the Geologi- 
es 1 Society of London', 'Zeitschrift der deutschen geo- 
logischen Gesellschaft', 'Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie, 
Mineralogic und Palaontologie', 'Geologisches Central- 



56 INDIANA UNIVEKSITY 

blatt', 'Geographische Zeitschrift ', 'Bulletin de la Societe 
Geologique de France', 'Annales de Geographie', 'An- 
nales de Paleontologie', 'Bulletin of the American Geo- 
graphical Society', 'Scottish Geographical Magazine', 
'Journal of Geography', 'Journal of Geology', 'Economic 
Geology', 'Bulletin of the Geological Society of America', 
'Bulletin of the Scientific Laboratories of Dennison Uni- 
versity', 'Bulletin of the Geological Department of the 
University of California', 'School of Mines Quarterly', 
'Engineering and Mining Journal', 'Transactions of the 
St. Louis Academy of Science', 'Journal of the Cincinnati 
Society of Natural History', 'Monthly Weather RevieAv'. 
Following are the courses open to graduate students 
in the Department. The more elementary courses are not 
here listed; for these see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

3. Economic Geology. Associate Professor Beede. 
Winter term, daily, at 10 :00. 

5. Systematic Paleontology. Professor ClJMlNGS and Associate 
Professor Beede. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, two to five hours at times to 
be arranged. 

10. Research. Investigations of geological and paleontological prob- 
lems. A careful report on each investigation is required, in 
proper form for publication. Frofessor Cumings and Asso- 
ciate Professor Beede. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 9:00 to 4 :. r )0. 

13. Advanced field work. Continuous work in the liold for a month 
or more in the Summer, Fall, or Spring. The course will 
usually form pari of the research work submitted for an ad- 
vanced degree. The work must be largely independent, hut 
will always he under the general oversight of a member of 
the Department. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 57 

[6a. Evolution. Study of the principles of evolution, as illustrated 
by fossil organisms. Professor CUMINGS. 
Winter term, at an hour to be arranged.] 
Omitted in 1910-11. 

14. Stratigraphic Geology. A thorough study of the literature of 
the various geologic systems. The history of their investiga- 
tion and the present knowledge of their divisions, distribu- 
tion, faunas and paleogeography will be exhaustively consid- 
ered. Professor Cumincs. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms. Lectures, T. Th., at 10:00. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 

David M. Mottier, Professor. 

Frank M. Andrews, Associate Professor. 

James M. Van Hook, Assistant Professor. 

Graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Arts 
in Botany comprises special studies along some line indi- 
cated in the advanced courses enumerated below, or the 
investigation of some problem of a more limited scope. 
For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the subject of the 
thesis is selected from some line of morphology, cytology, 
physiology, or mycology. A reading knowledge of Ger- 
man and French is assumed. 

The departmental library contains the more necessary 
works of reference and the principal botanical journals. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students 
in the Department. The more elementary courses are 
not here listed ; for these see the bulletin of the College of 
Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

4. Morphology of Fungi. Assistant Professor Van Hook. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1 :00 to 3 :00. 

5. Physiology. Associate Professor Andrews. 
Winter and Spring terms, daily. 



58 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

G. Cytology. Professor Mottier. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

5«. Advanced Physiology. Special studies will be offered to those 
pursuing work for advanced degrees. Associate Professor 
Andrews. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

7. Original Research. Problems for special investigation in mor- 
phology and cytology will be assigned to students who are 
prepared to undertake original work. Professor Mottier. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

Ability to read German and French is assumed. 

13. Morphology of the Algae. A study of the life-history and of 
the development of vegetative and reproductive organs in 
certain algae. The work is confined very largely to fresh- 
water forms. Professor Mottier. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily. 

18. Investigations in Mycology and Plant Pathology. Assistant 
Professor Van Hook. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 1 :00 to 3:00. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Carl II. Eigenmann, Professor and Director of the Biological Station. 
Febnandus Payne, Assistant Professor. 

Full work leading to the degree Ph.D. is offered in 
Course 6. It is purely a research course, and offers the 
widest choice of subjects permitted by the equipment of 
the Department. 

The subjects selected have radiated from two centers. 
( )ne of these is the problem or problems of the freshwater 
fauna of tropical America. At present the Department 
is engaged in a study of divergenl evolution as shown by 
the tropical American Charae'm lislies, and on a mono- 
graph on the fishes of British Guiana. 



GKADUATE SCHOOL 59 

The Department is well equipped for this work. The 
most important of the zoological collections is the collec- 
tion of fishes, comprising many thousand specimens. Ar- 
rangements have been made for cooperation with various 
other institutions, by which the largest aggregation of 
collections of South America freshwater fishes in the 
world is available for the monographs in preparation. 
By special arrangement the collections of Harvard Uni- 
\ vrsity, made by L. Agassiz and his assistants during the 
Thayer expedition, and by others, are available for a 
monograph on the American Characins. 

The Department has entered into vital relations with 
the Carnegie Museum of Pittsburg. Under the direction 
of Dr. W. J. Holland, director of this Museum, Mr. 
John Haseman, A.M. '07, during 1907-1910, explored the 
coastal rivers of Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina, between 
the Rio San Francisco and Buenos Aires. He ascended 
the Rio Paraguay, crossed to the Guapore and descended 
that river and the Rio Madeira to Manaos, on the Amazon, 
making collections on the way. 

Prom August to December, 1908, Professor Eigenmann, 
with Mr. S. E. Shideler as volunteer assistant, explored 
the Demarara, Essequibo, and Potaro rivers of British 
Guiana. Very extensive collections were made in the low- 
land, as well as above the Kaieteur, a vertical fall of 741 
feet of the Potaro river. The results of the expedition 
are being published by the Carnegie Museum as reports 
of the British Guiana Expedition of Indiana University 
and the Carnegie Museum. 

The second center of departmental interest has been 
and is the subject of heredity, especially : (A) The his- 
tory of the Sex Cells, (B) Variation, (C) the rate of onto- 



60 INDIANA UNIVEBSITY 

.genie and phylogenic modification of the sense organs of 
Cave Animals, (D) Regeneration. 

For the study of cave animals (C) the facilities of the 
Department are ideal. The University is located at the 
edge of the great cave region. By act of the Legislature, 
the Donaldson estate near Mitchell, Indiana, has been 
placed in the keeping of the trustees of Indiana Univers- 
ity. On it are situated numerous sink-holes, dry caves, 
and an underground water-course at least two miles long. 
This underground river is rich in blind fishes and other 
blind aquatic animals. A small laboratory and dwelling 
has been erected on the farm, and is in charge of a re- 
search fellow, appointed from year to year. In the study 
of cave animals the Department has in the past had the 
cooperation of the Carnegie Institution, the American As- 
sociation for the Advancement of Science, and the Eliza- 
beth Thompson Science Fund. 

For the study of variation (B) in non-migratory ver- 
tebrates in a 'unit of environment' this Department or- 
ganized and has since maintained a fresh-water Biological 
Station. It is at present located on Winona Lake, Kosci- 
usko County, Indiana, in the grounds of the Winona As- 
sembly. The Station owns, as a gift of the Winona As- 
sembly, two buildings, 20 x 45 feet, each two stories high. 
The buildings are on the lake front, at the mouth of 
Cherry Creek. The Station also owns boats, nets, sound- 
ing and temperature apparatus, glassware, etc. Micro- 
scopes and other needed apparatus arc moved to the Sta- 
tion from the University. 

For the study of sex cells (A), under the direction of 
Dr. Payne, the Department owns all the necessary appa- 
ratus, find Hie surroundings of the University offer an 
jibundance of material, 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 61 

Following are the courses open to graduate students 
m the Department. The more elementary courses' are 
not here listed; for these see the bulletin of the College 
of Libera] Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

."!. Advanced Zoology. Professor Eigenmann and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Payne. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, five hours a week. 

4. General Biological Problems : (A) The development of the 
idea of evolution and Darwinism; (B) The laws of hered- 
ity. Professor Eigenmann. 
Spring term, daily, 9 :00. 

f>. Seminary. Weekly meetings of advanced students and in- 
structors to discuss current literature and report on investi- 
gations in progress. Professor Eigenmann and Assistant 
Professor Payne. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, M., at 4:00. 

<>. Research. Special investigation of zoological problems, with a 
report on each investigation. Branches in which subjects 
have in the past been selected and reported upon are Varia- 
tion, Degeneration, Regeneration, Sense Organs, Embryology 
of Fishes, Faunal and Systematic Studies of Fishes. Ecology 
of Cave and Freshwater Animals. For a fuller statement, 
see the general statement of the Department. Professor 
Eigenmann and Assistant Professor Payne. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8:00 to 4:50. 

7. Biological Survey. A continuation of the previous work 
in the physical and biological features of Winona Lake and 
its environs. Professor Eigenmann. 
Summer term, at the Biological Station. 



62 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 



DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

Burton D. Myers, Professor. 
Augustus G. Pohlman, Professor. 

Following: are the courses open to graduate students 
in the Department. The more elementary courses are 
not here listed ; for these see the bulletin of the College 
of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

13. Research Work. Opportunity for research work is offered to 
advanced students who may have at least one-half their time 
for one year free for the work. Professors Myers and 
Pohlman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 

15. Advanced Course in Anatomy. Open to students who have com- 
pleted the dissection of the human body, and desire to do 
special or advanced work. Professors Myers and Pohlman. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be appointed. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 

William J. Moenkhaus, Professor. 
Dennis E. Jackson, Assistant Professor. 

Facilities for research leading to the higher degrees are 
available within restricted lines in general Physiology. 

Following are the courses open to graduate students 
in the Department. The more elementary courses are 
not here listed; for these see the bulletin of the College 
of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

6. Advanced Physiology. Professor Moenkhaus. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at hours to be arranged. 

7. Pharmacology. Assistant Professor Jackson. 
Spring term, M. W. P., 1 :00 to 4 :50. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 63 

10. Research. Problem work in certain phases of general physi- 
ology may be taken by those properly equipped. Professor 
Moenkiiaus, and Assistant Professor Jackson. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8 :00 to 4 :50. 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

Henry R. Alburger, Professor. 

The following course is open to graduate students 
in the Department. The more elementary courses are 
not here listed; for these see the bulletin of the College 
of Liberal Arts, or under that heading in the University 
catalogue. 

4. Advanced Work and Research. Advanced diagnostic work or 
research work under the direction of the head of the De- 
partment. The facilities permit work along any of the lines 
of pathological or bacteriological research. Professor Al- 
burgek. 
Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, daily, 8 :00 to 4 :50. 



School of Education 



William Lowe Bryan, President of the University, Acting Dean.' 
Ernest (). Holland, Professor of Secondary Education. 
William W. Black, Professor of Elementary Education. 
Elmer E. Jones, Professor of the History and Philosophy of Educa- 
tion. 
George F. Arps, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology. 
Henry Lester Smith, School Administration. 

Graduate work is offered in the School of Education, 
and special programs leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. de- 
grees, with the Master's and Doctor's Certificates of Edu- 
cation, will be arranged on application. 

In the future, as in the past, the best work of students 
in the courses in research work and in the pedagogical 
seminary will be published under the title 'Contributions 
from the Pedagogical Seminary of Indiana University.' 

Following are the courses open to graduate students 
in the School. The more elementary courses are not here 
listed; for these or for fuller statements of the courses 
below, see the bulletin of the School of Education. 

8. Secondary Education in Germany, France, and England. Pro- 
fessor Holland. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, at 11 :00. 

C>. History of Education. Professor JoNES. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 8:00. 

13a. The Teaching of French. Professor KUERSTEJNER. 
Spring term, T. Th., at an hour to be appointed. 

\'M>. The Teaching of German. Professor Vos. 

Spring term, T. Th., ;it an hour to he appointed. 
(64) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 65 

13©. The Teaching of Grammar in the High School. Associate Pro- 
fessor Stempel. 
Spring term, T., at 4 :00. 

13d. The Teaching of English in the High School. Mr. Pittengeb. 

Fall term. W., at 2:00. Repeated in the Spring term. 

13c The Teaching of History in the High School. Mr. Williams. 
Spring term, T., 4 :00 to 5 :30. 

13/. The Teaching of High School Mathematics, Professor Davis- 
son. 
Spring term. M. W.. at 4 :00. 

13/7. The Teaching of High School Physics. Professor Foley. 
Spring term, at an hour to he appointed. 

10. Philosophy of Education. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W. F., at 8:00. 

15. School Administration. Superintendent Smith. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, M. W., at 7 :00 p.m. 

16a. Educational Seminary. Professor Jones. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T., at 7 :00. 

166. Seminary in Social Education. Professor Holland. 

Fall term, two hours a week. Repeated in the Spring term. 

17. Advanced Educational Psychology. Associate Professor Arps. 
Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 9 :00. 

9. Orthogenics. Professor Jones. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th.. at 3 :00. 

11. Principles of Organization and Supervision. Development of 

the law and principles that control in the organization and 
conduct of the school. The law evolving the school. The 
curriculum under its logical and psychological aspects ; the 
basis for making a course of study ; comparison of typical 
courses. Universal method in teaching. The organization 
of a subject. The organic relation of the logical, esthetic, 
and ethical ends in education. Professor Black. 

Fall. Winter, and Spring terms, T. Th., at 2 :00. 

open to Graduate students, and to teachers of wide experience. 



66 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 

18. Research in Education. 

a. The problems of the Elementary School. Professor 

Black. 

b. The History and Philosophy of Education. Professor 

Jones. 

c. The Psychology of the Processes of Education. Associ- 

ate Professor Arps. 

d. Secondary Education. Professor Holland. 
Problems and hours to be arranged with professors in charge. 



Indiana University comprises the following schools 

The College of Liberal Arts, 

The School of Education, 

The Graduate School, 

The School of Law, 

The School of Medicine. 

The following publications are issued annually by the 
University : 

The University Catalogue, 
The Spring Term Bulletin, 
The Summer Term Bulletin, 
Bulletin of the College of Liberal Arts, 
Bulletin of the School of Education, 
Bulletin of the Graduate School, 
Bulletin of the School of Law, 
Bulletin of the School of Medicine. 

Any of these publications will be sent upon applica- 
tion to 

The Registrar, Indiana University, 

Bloomington, Indiana. 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



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